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  1. #201

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    Got it straightened out! Enjoy:

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #202

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    Enjoyed "Shelter" very much!
    Thanks for sorting it out how to post it.
    Great ending..."aaahhhhh"!

  4. #203

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greco
    Enjoyed "Shelter" very much!
    Thanks for sorting it out how to post it.
    Great ending..."aaahhhhh"!
    Thanks. We cleaned up the sound for the final CD cut, but I still sound out of tune----grrr---on this version, and you can hear an edit where I switched to acoustic for what reason I'm sure I don't remember----grrr again.

    But we're all our own worst critics...

  5. #204

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    Here's a small ballad of mine, that i see as kind of an interlude simple song, good for closing up a live set or gig. Originally written for piano guitar and bass, but performed here with an organ trio.


  6. #205

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alter
    Here's a small ballad of mine, that i see as kind of an interlude simple song, good for closing up a live set or gig. Originally written for piano guitar and bass, but performed here with an organ trio.
    That’s nice. It could be a nice soul tune with the right lyrics.

  7. #206

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    “Norwegian” - jazz quartet with percussion ensembleThis is an original that my band put together and our synth player arranged with the added support of a second vibraphone, marimba, gong, bass drum, and some other pieces.

  8. #207

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    I would enjoy a thread about the compositional process if there were enough people interested in participating.
    it would be very interesting

    moreover, and without wanting to oppose things, I am surprised that speaking of compositions, we do not post here scores (partitions), but recordings that gives a possible version

    it's a bit boring to appreciate separately a composition and such interpretations/improvisations

    there are some really nice things to ear, and unless they're copyrighted, we'd like to see them written. There are a topic on pencils to write music, if that helps, unless the problem is specific to guitarist composers, it's a hypothesis that some have raised elsewhere
    Last edited by Patlotch; 02-14-2020 at 09:03 AM.

  9. #208

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    A newer one, being premiered tonight at Fat Cat, NY:

    (just a lead sheet---not the full chart w/2 soli---I'll look for that and post it later)



    Ha ha---turns out Perk Up was the only piece we didn't play! Great night, anyway...
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    Last edited by joelf; 02-15-2020 at 10:14 AM.

  10. #209

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    Quote Originally Posted by Patlotch
    it would be very interesting

    moreover, and without wanting to oppose things, I am surprised that speaking of compositions, we do not post here scores (partitions), but recordings that gives a possible version

    it's a bit boring to appreciate separately a composition and such interpretations/improvisations

    there are some really nice things to ear, and unless they're copyrighted, we'd like to see them written. There are a topic on pencils to write music, if that helps, unless the problem is specific to guitarist composers, it's a hypothesis that some have raised elsewhere
    Not everything we write has been recorded. Composers write a lot, and it can't always all be documented. And some haven't been written down, but taught to bandmates verbally, as in the African tradition of handing down lore. Having said that, I feel it's way better to hear something come alive than check out paper only.

    But I agree we all should have the opportunity to scan and study the score as we listen...

  11. #210

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    Not everything we write has been recorded. Composers write a lot, and it can't always all be documented. And some haven't been written down, but taught to bandmates verbally, as in the African tradition of handing down lore. Having said that, I feel it's way better to hear something come alive than check out paper only.

    But I agree we all should have the opportunity to scan and study the score as we listen...
    for my part, I still think that the relationship between composition and improvisation/interpretation deserves to be asked, and I do not see how to do it if the composition is not discerned, by writing such an improvised version

    referring to the "oral transmission", or the "Head Arrangements" of the first Count Basie in Kansas City*, that's very nice, but it doesn't seem to me that it corresponds to what happens between your compositions and your acting on stage, this unless you have great ears, of course, as 'professional musicians', ears almost better than the desk musicians and improvisers of Count Basie. How do you verbally transmit relatively complex harmonic sequences of chords that you write on paper?
    * COUNT BASIE’S “HEAD ARRANGEMENTS”

    as for referring to oral transmission in African music, I know it a little, since the group of djembe in which I participated was confronted with the reality of the reference recordings (Mamady Keïta) and its methods, transcribed inspired by western music (with the help of his german partner), which is a challenge, since there is no rhythmic build (3/4, 4/4, 6/8 ...) but a mixture/overlay of different beats, nor bar nor bar's with beginnings, it's constantly cyclical

    and so the transcription is only a simplification, including what the "african composer" (Keïta is one of them) has in mind, which his musicians will only grasp by playing it. This is also the case with any transcription of the great classical composers, there is a huge loss and no way to find them, hence so many versions yet faithful to the writing





    wouldn't there be a little fanfare to pretend that this is the case? Or I didn't interpret what you were saying correctly?

    on the other hand,, how does a band other than yours to play your compositions, in your absence, what I wish it would happen to you (even to me, unknown little composer, it happened ...). It's not just about "study the score", it's just about being able to play it
    Last edited by Patlotch; 02-16-2020 at 02:59 AM.

  12. #211

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    Written music can only go so far. There's so much that just cannot be communicated by writing it down, being it rhythmic like in african music, or melodic like in eastern ones. The more we look into cultures with a less mathematical approach, and a more verbal tradition of carrying the music to the next generation, folk idioms etc, the more this seems to be the case. The more we look in detail and depth into any kind of music really, the more it applies. I guess the only way for musicians to interpret it the best they can is to learn the language, which involves listening.. living.. being.. It's some serious amount of work!

    There are a lot of composers in jazz, especially modern ones, that are very thorough, complicated and precise in what they write, but i 've always viewed jazz as music that is about collective improvisation, instant composing if you want, action and reaction to what's happening, and all this within a specific (or not so specific many times ) musical style. So i more or less see jazz compositions as a vehicle for musicians to play and create. There is great art in that of course, but i feel the essence of this music is in the playing. I felt so even more strongly after studying classical guitar and acquainting myself somewhat with the way the classical world works.. i 've discovered the jazz thing suits me better!

  13. #212

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    A lot of my pieces are tributes to musicians I've interacted with, and they had an impact. I have a set in shows where we do maybe 5 tunes with that theme. A big one was Eddie Diehl, ergo: Diehlin'

    (Note, Final, and better changes on the 1st measure, bottom line, blowing part: G Maj 7/C Maj 7---2 beats each. I also like F7 #11 for the 1st chord of the next bar. (In other words, just play the changes over the damn melody!)...
    Attached Images Attached Images Our Own Compositions. Post them here!-diehlin-concert-pdf-sheet-jpg 

  14. #213

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    I don't think real jazz can be accurately notated, and have played for a few jazz orchestra directors that badgered the groups constantly about playing the "music", not the charts, because jazz demands more.

  15. #214

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    This one was originally in tribute to one Ben---then another passed away: Benson Gee, manager of Fat Cat and so beloved for his hard-working, generous and humble ways it's now his song forever:
    Last edited by joelf; 02-19-2020 at 10:27 PM.

  16. #215

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    Quote Originally Posted by Patlotch
    it would be very interesting

    moreover, and without wanting to oppose things, I am surprised that speaking of compositions, we do not post here scores (partitions), but recordings that gives a possible version

    it's a bit boring to appreciate separately a composition and such interpretations/improvisations

    there are some really nice things to ear, and unless they're copyrighted, we'd like to see them written. There are a topic on pencils to write music, if that helps, unless the problem is specific to guitarist composers, it's a hypothesis that some have raised elsewhere
    For the most part, I don't actually score my compositions. Recording is mainly the way I memorialize them, and the people I play with mainly pick them up by ear, either from the recordings or just by talking through the tune. I have started scoring some of them recently, though. I suspect a lo of others are in the same boat. By the way, copyright applies to a composition (not to the means by which it is memorialized), regardless of whether it's recorded in writing or in audio, or some other means. In terms of whether a _composition_ is protected by copyright law and/or put in danger of being used without permission, it makes no difference whether it's shared as a recording or a score. Performances (a recording is a kind of performance) are also (sometimes) protected by copyright, but the performance and the underlying composition are different things, and a complicated subject.

    John

  17. #216

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    Gentle Ben, scanned---duh!:
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  18. #217

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    (The above was originally in tribute to one Ben---then another passed away: Benson Gee, manager of Fat Cat and so beloved for his hard-working, generous and humble ways it's now his song forever)...

  19. #218

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    (The above was originally in tribute to one Ben---then another passed away: Benson Gee, manager of Fat Cat and so beloved for his hard-working, generous and humble ways it's now his song forever)...
    Wow Joel,

    I stumbled through it. Haven't played a chord progression like that since my college big band days (around 1980). Really beautiful. Tried to somewhat chord melody it but really stumbled, I don't read much anymore (and not so good at transposing up the octave, not really a tranposition I guess, just the way guitar is usually written up an octave).

    I'd love to hear this played properly.

    Thanks for posting

  20. #219

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    Quote Originally Posted by fep
    Wow Joel,

    I stumbled through it. Haven't played a chord progression like that since my college big band days (around 1980). Really beautiful. Tried to somewhat chord melody it but really stumbled, I don't read much anymore (and not so good at transposing up the octave, not really a tranposition I guess, just the way guitar is usually written up an octave).

    I'd love to hear this played properly.

    Thanks for posting
    Thanks. I can hardly blow on it myself. Bailed on soloing on the recent gig. It's hard, and was written in '95. I write much simpler now. Glad you dug it...

  21. #220

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    If you have the time and inclination:

    1) Not a Bad November was my first lyric. It's a ballad and the story will reveal itself. Many, myself included, feel it's my best song.
    You can check the demo (Vicki Doney, vcl.; Steve Ash, pno) against the lead sheet.



    2) Don't Step on my Dreams is a straight up swing shuffle, medium up. I should write this for a big band.
    3) Leavin' is a bittersweet song w/lyric I wrote upon leaving NY---I thought for good---for Holland. Straight 8ths w/backbeat. Kinda slow.
    4) The Man Who Cared Too Much is another straight 8th vibe, close to a bossa, but not really a bossa.

    Hope you enjoy them...
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