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  1. #1

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    Do you know the chord analysis for wave? The intro goes D-7 G7|D-7 G7 and keeps repeating. You could play C major over that.

    Does anyone know the whole chords analysis for the whole song?

    Thanks.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Check out Gilbert Medam on You Tube playing Wave. He plays the chords you would expect and takes a nice solo. I have heard a dozen versions and this one is true to Jobim.


    Black cat

  4. #3

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    Well the intro and outro is in C (or better D dorian) but not the song, which mainly remains in the key of Dmaj.

    Dmaj obvious
    Bb° altered dominant to Am
    Am D7 Gj Gmin is a II-V-I to the subdominant with the typical maj-min on the IV
    F# B7 ... and so on, dominant chain* that leads back to the root, but !surprise! in minor, same figure like in the intro.

    The bridge are two II-V-I situations, first in F second in Eb (the I substituted with parallel minor, typical Jobim)

    Hope this helped.

    Cheers

    Stefan

    * F# B7 leading to E7 (forget the B-7) Bb7 = E7alt and A7 is the dominant that funnily goes to Dm instead of Dj
    Last edited by DonEsteban; 05-28-2010 at 04:47 AM. Reason: typo

  5. #4

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    no Bdim in wave

  6. #5

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    Thanks randalljazz, I corrected the typo, second cord is a Bbdim

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by DonEsteban
    Thanks randalljazz, I corrected the typo, second cord is a Bbdim
    so if only a "typo", how is it an altered dominant to Am?

  8. #7

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    You're right again, I was misled, because it sounds like a dominant, but not to Am. To my ears it sounds like a A7b9, and this could be interpreted as dominant to the D7, jumping over the not so relevant Am. Or as a suspension to Am.... well....

    But basically the melody here is a Bbdim (or Gdim to be precise) arpeggio, that's why the cord is here in the first place, I think.

    As I normally always avoid playing diminished arpeggios soloing over diminished cords, I mostly do it in this particular measure, because it nicely reminds me (and the audience I hope) of the melody. Halftone/wholetone would do it too of course.

  9. #8

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    Dma7 is I or Lyd. The Bbdim7 is a modal interchange to 7th degree of B har. Min. ( Bmin. would have been the rel. min. of Dmaj.) So the Bbdim. is a dim. chord but not symmetrical, it's the 7th degree of B har. min. The A-7 D7 is II V of new key of Gmaj. the G-6 is Modal interchange again to G Melodic Min.
    F#13 is V of B7 , The F#7 alt is the sub for C7 or bII of B.( F# alt or C7#11) all from G Melodic Min. The B7 is V of E7 with B7alt.( B7alt is sub for F7#11 or bII, like sequence before) going to E7 with rel. II- or you can call ir E7sus to E7. All which is V of A7 or V of V which becomes alt. because through the magic of modal interchange the IMaj chord become I-. The Bb7#11 chord was subV of A7alt. When I have more time I'll write out chart with analysis above each chord and post PDF file. Best Reg

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Reg
    Dma7 is I or Lyd. The Bbdim7 is a modal interchange to 7th degree of B har. Min. ( Bmin. would have been the rel. min. of Dmaj.) So the Bbdim. is a dim. chord but not symmetrical, it's the 7th degree of B har. min. The A-7 D7 is II V of new key of Gmaj. the G-6 is Modal interchange again to G Melodic Min.
    F#13 is V of B7 , The F#7 alt is the sub for C7 or bII of B.( F# alt or C7#11) all from G Melodic Min. The B7 is V of E7 with B7alt.( B7alt is sub for F7#11 or bII, like sequence before) going to E7 with rel. II- or you can call ir E7sus to E7. All which is V of A7 or V of V which becomes alt. because through the magic of modal interchange the IMaj chord become I-. The Bb7#11 chord was subV of A7alt. When I have more time I'll write out chart with analysis above each chord and post PDF file. Best Reg
    good analysis. i hear the Bbdim simply as an upper leading tone diminished to the Am. a more complicated way of saying the same thing is to call it a bV sub for Em, which chord would be common to the opening key of D and the soon-to-be key of the moment, G (ii and vi, respectively)--pivot chord, in classic parlance. ricigliano mentions this usage of the diminished chord in his jazz & popular harmony (revised edition, 1969), page 77.

    | Dmaj | Em | Am | D7 | sounds smoother to my ears than

    | Dmaj | Bm | Am | D7 | but who knows what jobim was thinking?

  11. #10

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    Hey Randal... yea very well could be. I haven't played tune in years. I think I use to actually play... D6/9 / C#-7b5 F#7#9 / Bmi,B-maj7,B-7,Bb13 / A-7, D7b9 /GM7, G6/9 / G-7,C13#11/ F#13sus,F#7b13/ B9sus, B7b9,F13/ B-7, B-6/ Bb13, A7b13#9/ etc... I actually hear the B-, I'll try and make PDF examples of my comping... Always the Best...Reg

  12. #11

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    For the intro (Dm - G7) I use F lydian to G mixolydian which moves nicely to E dorian over the Dmaj chord. It is a little airy but I like it.
    There are a kinds of things you can do here.

  13. #12
    TommyD Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Black cat
    Check out Gilbert Medam on You Tube playing Wave. He plays the chords you would expect and takes a nice solo. I have heard a dozen versions and this one is true to Jobim.


    Black cat
    He makes it look so easy. Wonderful! And one of the great tunes of all time!
    tommy/

  14. #13

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    Very beautiful, old straight bossa style, almost boring...heard a billion versions just like his. I dig latin music when the standards become a little hipper harmonically and rhythmically, (usually don't have to bring up the rhythm thing), but that was like a senior citizen version. And the solo section would be nice if it did something, not a memorized version... but then I'm a jazz player. Don't get me wrong... Gilbert Medam is a wonderful Guitarist, that version of Wave was just a little like elevator music... Sorry man, I don't mean to whine, but .... well it was lovely, aspire to be more... Best Reg
    PS I know... I need to post more samples, to cover...

  15. #14

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    For the intro (Dm - G7) I use F lydian to G mixolydian

    which moves nicely to E dorian over the Dmaj chord.
    I have trouble following this. Isn't this using a C-scale for key-of-C chords, and using the D-scale for the I chord in D.

    If the bass plays a D, and comp is a D-chord, is that the Ionian mode? The melody can emphasize E's, but that doesn't change the mode, does it?

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aristotle
    I have trouble following this. Isn't this using a C-scale for key-of-C chords, and using the D-scale for the I chord in D.

    If the bass plays a D, and comp is a D-chord, is that the Ionian mode? The melody can emphasize E's, but that doesn't change the mode, does it?
    Yikes, we're agreeing, Ari! In a song like this, modes just confuse me. Certainly there are simpler ways to explain things.

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by randalljazz
    good analysis. i hear the Bbdim simply as an upper leading tone diminished to the Am. a more complicated way of saying the same thing is to call it a bV sub for Em, which chord would be common to the opening key of D and the soon-to-be key of the moment, G (ii and vi, respectively)--pivot chord, in classic parlance. ricigliano mentions this usage of the diminished chord in his jazz & popular harmony (revised edition, 1969), page 77.

    | Dmaj | Em | Am | D7 | sounds smoother to my ears than

    | Dmaj | Bm | Am | D7 | but who knows what jobim was thinking?
    I agree with that. "DMaj Bm" sounds to my ear nearly the same as "DMaj" -- the Bm isn't really pulling you away from the sound of DMaj. But in the melody you have that diminished arp, which say "chord change!" to me. (Plus the arp (G-Bb-C#-E-G) plain doesn't work over Bmin for me!)

    For that Bbdim7 I could also see it as A7b9, then you have the A dom to Amin progression, which is common. But then I'm converging on your Em (b5?):

    | Dmaj | Em7b5 | Am | D7 |
    | Dmaj | Em7b5 A7b9 | Am | D7 |
    | Dmaj | A7b9| Am | D7 |

    Variations of each other?

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aristotle
    I have trouble following this. Isn't this using a C-scale for key-of-C chords, and using the D-scale for the I chord in D.

    If the bass plays a D, and comp is a D-chord, is that the Ionian mode? The melody can emphasize E's, but that doesn't change the mode, does it?
    Try it. It is just a little "outside" but it is easy to pull back in.
    The E dorian scale is built from the second step of the Dmaj.

    Don't think too much about it ..play it. The idea is to establish an extended line over the chords with out loosing the gentry. If you think in terms of C and D you risk loosing the idea of "skating" over the changes.
    The idea is to avoid establishing root tonality until it is time to pull it together.

    Don't over analyze .....yes the are derived from C and D .... avoid think scale roots.
    Last edited by Henry Mars; 05-30-2010 at 01:05 PM.

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles
    Yikes, we're agreeing, Ari! In a song like this, modes just confuse me. Certainly there are simpler ways to explain things.
    I wouldn't want your confidence to be disturbed by agreeing with me, so I'll try to be controversial.

    My post had nothing to do with "simpler."

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aristotle
    I wouldn't want your confidence to be disturbed by agreeing with me, so I'll try to be controversial.

    My post had nothing to do with "simpler."
    Whew! That was close! I thought I slipped into an alternate universe.

  21. #20

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    I like the Em7b5 A7b9 thing, it works and gives plenty of relevant material for improvising, also nice bass motion if you're doing a solo version.

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by randalljazz
    good analysis. i hear the Bbdim simply as an upper leading tone diminished to the Am. a more complicated way of saying the same thing is to call it a bV sub for Em, which chord would be common to the opening key of D and the soon-to-be key of the moment, G (ii and vi, respectively)--pivot chord, in classic parlance. ricigliano mentions this usage of the diminished chord in his jazz & popular harmony (revised edition, 1969), page 77.

    | Dmaj | Em | Am | D7 | sounds smoother to my ears than

    | Dmaj | Bm | Am | D7 | but who knows what jobim was thinking?
    What do you hear as the rest of the notes in the Bbdim 7 chord bar(2nd bar)
    besides the G Bb C# E, and where do they come from? When I said modal interchange from 7th degree of B harmonic min.( Bbdim.7). That doesn't mean B-, it means Bbdim7,(A#dim7) from B har. min. ( A# B C# D E F# G A#), which gives harmonic source of chord and rest of notes. I'm not sure I understand the Bbdim7 being a bV sub for Em, ( either pivot version, ii or vi), maybe E7. I can see the root motion being a bV, but don't get the rest of the notes. In traditional terms... Bbdim could be leading tone dim. from B Har Min ( Rel Min) or upper leading tone dim from 7th degree of V7 chord, but it's not that functional to talk about jazz harmony with traditional or classical terms. Again what do you hear as rest of notes over the Bbdim7 chord. There are a few choices, I don't hear the modulation until the 3rd bar. I agree, who knows what Jobin was thinking, but most latin composers from that time frame were looking to jazz for sources of harmony... still are. Just as jazz composers and players were looking at latin music for sources of rhythm and forms... still are. Always the best Reg

  23. #22

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    D6/9 / C#-7b5 F#7#9 / Bmi,B-maj7,B-7,Bb13 / A-7, D7b9 /

    hmmm...i like your re-harm--significant elaboration on jobim's progression (too many chords for my meager abilities--i can play four chords in a measure if it's a ballad, maybe)

    simpler | Dmaj7 | Bbdim7 Bmmaj7 | Am7 | D7b9 | etc, also flows nicely...

    but still, it involves an assumption. with the second measure only Bbdim7 (as written), it already sounds like it is moving out of tonic. as i said, i just call it an upper leading tone. you could 'account' for the notes (if you must) as modal interchange--D harmonic minor.

    the unseen Em is the pivot--ii in D and vi in G. jazzers may not analyze in such terms very much, but pivot chords are common in jazz and popular harmony.

    as for professor ricigliano's flat five sub designation..."the diminished seventh chord may sometimes be used in the place of a flat 5 dominant seventh substitute..." op cit (note: on the same root as the b5 V7). i presume this is his observation from many years of study and practice.


    as for jobim borrowing jazz harmony: he was adamant that he never did so, and any influence went the other way. shrug. he was classically trained, and drew his harmonic inspiration from debussy, ravel and villa-lobos (the first two of which also fed the post-bop jazzers, which may serve to explain practices in common.

    cheers

  24. #23

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    Hey Randal... yea Bb C# D E F G A, I can hear that... and the Bbdim7 is sub or bV of E-7b5 from classic Imaj to Imin modal interchange. Would get to that through soloing, but not what my ears hear first, I always heard Tonic to Dominant on 1st two bars, which it still is, just a few different notes. Thanks for insights on Jobin... It's interesting how simple things can be viewed, as always Best Reg

  25. #24

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    DM7 (I) | Bb dim7 (V7 b9) | Am7 (v m7) D7 (I7) |
    //// //// // //
    GM7 (IV)| Gm6 (iv m6) | F#13 F#7 #5 (III 7) | B9 B7 b9 (VI7) |
    //// //// // // // //
    Bm7/E (V7) | Bb7 (#V7) A7 (V7) |Dm7 (im7) G7 (IV7) |Dm7 (im7) G7 (IV7) ||
    //// // // // // // //

    (The bridge has same changes as One Note Samba.)

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by flippeters
    DM7 (I) | Bb dim7 (V7 b9) | Am7 (v m7) D7 (I7) |
    //// //// // //
    GM7 (IV)| Gm6 (iv m6) | F#13 F#7 #5 (III 7) | B9 B7 b9 (VI7) |
    //// //// // // // //
    Bm7/E (V7) | Bb7 (#V7) A7 (V7) |Dm7 (im7) G7 (IV7) |Dm7 (im7) G7 (IV7) ||
    //// // // // // // //

    (The bridge has same changes as One Note Samba.)
    Sorry man, I don't really hear Wave as a blues... and I can force most tunes into a blues. You can play blues over any Maj. chord and it's cool and you could play standard maj. and mim. blues licks to imply tonal change. I mean our ears can pretty much hear blues over anything but that doesn't make a tune a blues form. There's a difference between a blues tune and playin the blues over a tune, and I guess that reflects your analysis, how you play over the changes rather than how chords function. It's cool the only roman numeral I can't take is the #V7... would make more sense as bV7... standard blues chord. Best Reg

  27. #26

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    I just mean structurally, not in feel. 3 4-bar phrases. Now as far as what to play over the changes that's another story. :-)
    Best, FP

  28. #27

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    This went from Chord Analysis for Wave to Chord Essays on Wave.
    Seriously, do you think about all those chords when improv? I mean, four chords in a bar would be way too much material to solo over, I bet most of the time the soloist would end up using a single scale to solo over it. Now comping is another story, it would give enough meat to the soloist to blow his mind. Anyway, nice analysis it's always interesting to see how many reharmonizations comes from a single standard.

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by saponsky
    This went from Chord Analysis for Wave to Chord Essays on Wave.
    Seriously, do you think about all those chords when improv? I mean, four chords in a bar would be way too much material to solo over, I bet most of the time the soloist would end up using a single scale to solo over it.
    No I don't agree, although Wave doesn't move between different keys as much as lots of people seem to believe, single-scaling over Wave wouldn't really produce a cool result IMHO.

    EDIT 2010-07-21 longish rant edited will open a new thread /EDIT
    Last edited by DonEsteban; 07-21-2010 at 10:48 AM.

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aristotle
    I have trouble following this. Isn't this using a C-scale for key-of-C chords, and using the D-scale for the I chord in D.

    If the bass plays a D, and comp is a D-chord, is that the Ionian mode? The melody can emphasize E's, but that doesn't change the mode, does it?
    There are ways of taking this way outside but in the end isn't that what is is?

  31. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Henry Mars
    There are ways of taking this way outside but in the end isn't that what is is?
    Huh? And why are you responding to the same two sentences you already addressed in post 18?

    I'll repeat the simple question I asked that went unanswered.

    To this:
    "...which moves nicely to E dorian over the Dmaj chord."
    I asked:
    "The melody can emphasize E's, but that doesn't change the mode, does it?"

  32. #31

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    Hey guys. I'm just going to resurrect this super old thread from the dead. I was reading it and the analyses that have been offered up so far are pretty good, except for that in classical music, there is a name for the #V7 chord, and that is a German Augmented sixth chord. It precedes a dominant and is an extremely potent anticipation for such. there is a upper and lower leading tone to the root of the dominant chord, anyways just thought I'd clear that up.

    It's not necessarily a standard thing to do but it can go between a ii and a V. There's that little spot right before a dominant comes up where shit can hit the fan about 5 different ways approaching the dominant, and it's always good to know what those options are for your own songs and analyses of tunes.

    Also, I was going to say that if it was a B diminished in the beginning it would be a common-tone diminished chord, another classical device. I'm just getting into jazz theory more and I haven't encountered that one yet but that's a pretty jazzy-sounding classical chord change. But it isn't, it's actually a Bb diminished, in which case I think it's basically a passing chord. From D major you've got a common tone- C#. F# rises to G and D rises to E, where they remain common tones until Am7 is reached. A goes to Bb and then drops back down to A again. (idealized voice-leading)

    Or, an easy way to actually see this on guitar more specifically is probably just the easiest way to play it- right around the fifth fret Dmaj7 goes to Bbo7 (root on the high E string 6th fret) then you drop down to that drop 2 or open bar chord Am7. It almost looks like the Dmaj7 is 'melting' down into the A minor diagonally. pretty neat

    Love the song, jazz on guys, keep it real magical

  33. #32

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    Oh also, yeah I forgot to mention that staying in one particular key without coloring outside of the lines would be a foolish endeavor. I think it's definitely in D though, throughout pretty much the whole thing, but there is so much modal interchange that you have to mess around outtside of the key.

    The best results I've had so far I've just blown over the whole thing in D major and minor combined into one scale. I just start and end my lines on chord tones and mess around with D,E,F,F#,G,(G#),A,Bb,B,(C),C#, and D- which is basically almost every note I just realized lol. I don't know, the only one i guess I skip all the time is the D# in this song.

    A good way for folks to get started doing this is to mess around in D major but throw in minor pentatonics. Then convert the major to Bebop (which are the notes in parenthesis), and mess around with a flatted sixth every now and then. That's my idea works pretty well if I do say so. I might record a version later and illustrate what I mean.

  34. #33

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    Wave's A Section is an sophisticated reharmonisation of a 12 bar blues in D. I'll put the relevant chords in bold. It's actually quite common to have the chords in a blues be major sevenths - take Blues for Alice for instance. Parker will freely swap major and dominant sounds on blues progressions.

    Anyhoo:

    Dmaj7 | Bbo7 | Am7 | D7 |
    Gmaj7 | Gm6 | F#7 (no D) | B7 |
    E7 | Bb7 A7 | Dm7 G7 | Dm7 G7 |

    Study these changes and compare them to the simplest 12 bar in D.

    Biggest divergences - instead of returning to I in bar we use a 'turnback' sub III7, which kicks of a cycle of fourth progression in dominant sevenths.

    At end of the A we have a modal interchange into D dorian/minor - with that Dm7 G7 vamp.

    So, I see this very much as:
    Dmaj7 --> D7 --> Gmaj7 --> F#7 -->-->-->-->Dm

    If that makes any sense - all the movement, the ii-V-I in G in bars 3-5, the G Gm in bar with the unexpected turnback F#7 instead of the standard C - all of this is standard stuff. the V chord A7 is delayed until the second half of bar 10, but a delayed V is not very unusual.

    All of these can be used as subs for a standard blues for soloing etc.

    The bridge features inversions of standard ii-V-I's in F and Eb

    Gm C7 Fmaj7 --> Gm7/Bb C7/Bb Fmaj7/A
    Fm Bb7 Ebmaj7 --> Fm/Ab Bb7/A Ebmaj7/G

    Hope that helps.

    EDIT: Zombie thread FFS. Oh well hope this of interest to someone somewhere.

  35. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77

    The bridge features inversions of standard ii-V-I's in F and Eb

    Gm C7 Fmaj7 --> Gm7/Bb C7/Bb Fmaj7/A
    Fm Bb7 Ebmaj7 --> Fm/Ab Bb7/A Ebmaj7/G
    You mean Ab of course? Gm C7 Fmaj7 --> Gm7/Bb C7/Bb Fmaj7/A
    Fm Bb7 Ebmaj7 --> Fm/Ab Bb7/Ab Ebmaj7/G

    Those are great! I learned it the hard way, on a gig, when my bass player started to play those bass notes of inversions, I was like woah, wait, what?? And then he did the same thing on In A Sentimental Mood... I'm just too square for jazz and go the easy way, unless something like that happens. Of course, it sounds great and and adds more 'colors' to the tune!

    Edit: Just looked in a fake book, so those inversions are there to begin with, I guess when I was learning this tune ages ago somehow I just ignored the bass notes all along...
    Last edited by Hep To The Jive; 10-18-2016 at 12:49 PM.

  36. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hep To The Jive
    You mean Ab of course? Gm C7 Fmaj7 --> Gm7/Bb C7/Bb Fmaj7/A
    Fm Bb7 Ebmaj7 --> Fm/Ab Bb7/Ab Ebmaj7/G

    Those are great! I learned it the hard way, on a gig, when my bass player started to play those bass notes of inversions, I was like woah, wait, what?? And then he did the same thing on In A Sentimental Mood... I'm just too square for jazz and go the easy way, unless something like that happens. Of course, it sounds great and and adds more 'colors' to the tune!

    Edit: Just looked in a fake book, so those inversions are there to begin with, I guess when I was learning this tune ages ago somehow I just ignored the bass notes all along...
    You are correct.

    And yes I love that shit for movement in fourths...

  37. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Thanks. I had to have it pointed out to me, it's not obvious I don't think?
    Al Jarreau's Glow is similar.

  38. #37

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    Suggestion for that 2nd line of the bridge (Fm7 to Bb7): Ab(triad)/Bb to Bb7/Ab
    Last edited by destinytot; 10-18-2016 at 03:40 PM. Reason: to

  39. #38

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    https://books.google.co.uk/books/abo...d=OzsFAAAACAAJ


    Chords analysis for Wave-51gnftlgk9l-jpg

    I Highly recommend this book for Jobim Solo Guitar... all arrangements are in original released key from Jobim
    so you will have to work a bit to transpose "Amor em Paz" to sound like Wes etc...

  40. #39

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    Here is my take on the Bdim7 in measure 2. I have no particular expertise but I find this analysis to be much simpler and more practical.


    1. The song is in D. ii = Em.


    2. Add 6 -> Em6 = iim6


    3. Then add b5 -> Em6b5 = iim6b5 = Edim7.


    4. Bbdim7 -- the chord commonly specified -- equals Edim7/B.

    5. For purposes of harmonic analysis, it's easier to think of Bdim7 as Edim7 or Em6b5 if you prefer. Then it's just a modified ii in the key of D. Relates directly to the tonic chord.


    6. Therefore you can use all your ii-V-in-D stuff that doesn't clash with the b5 in Em6b5. Except for the b5, you're not leaving the key of D.


    7. iidim7 can also be a sub for V7 but I leave it to you all to develop the possibilities of that.

    I've only been working on this wrinkle for a couple of days, so kindly point out any errors you see.

  41. #40

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    Bbo7 Am7 D7 Gmaj7

    If we take Gmaj7 as temporary tonic, Bbo7 = bIIIdim7

    biiio7 very common in
    - Pre war jazz
    - Jobim tunes

    How you play over these things is up to you. A lot of players ignore them or sub biiio7 for a biiim7, something like this:

    Bbm7 Am7 D7 Gmaj7 on the whole progression

    Myself, I really like F# triad on Bbo7. I like

    F#/Bb G/A B/D Bm/G

    Other well known tunes with a biiio7

    Out of Nowhere
    Body and Soul
    Night and Day
    Corcovado
    Insenatez
    Pennies from Heaven
    Embraceable You
    Darn That Dream (original changes - Bbo7 often subbed for Bbm7 Eb7)
    Just Friends (ditto!)
    Stella by Starlight (first chord Dbo7 usually subbed Em7b5 A7b9)
    and so on and so forth

    Get used to them ;-) Also that tune list will give you some idea of how they can be subbed.

  42. #41

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    Chords analysis for Wave-wave-jpg

    It's the melody! Just take the chord literally and play a symmetric thing over it.

    WT/HT would be the scale of the day, the melody is made of it!

  43. #42

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    Wave is a 12 bar blues, nicely reharmonized, with a bridge.

    The first chord is usually Dmaj7. The second chord follows the melody at that point, G Bb Db E. Dim7? 7b9?

    I usually play Eb9 (since I hear it as a half step up), but if forced to think (like now) I end up thinking of it as a V7b9 in D, that is A7b9. And, my Eb9 is a tritone for A7.

    So, it's Dmaj A7 Dmaj D7 G -- grossly oversimplified.

    The Gmaj7 strikes me as a IV chord in the 12 bar blues, so I don't think of the song as going into G tonal center by the second chord, although I guess you could.
    Last edited by rpjazzguitar; 09-16-2020 at 05:23 AM.

  44. #43

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    Tinkled around I like playing A7b9 --> D7 --> G best over Bbo7 Am7 D7 Gmaj7 - simple enough progression...

    But a really nice thing to key into is the line A-Bb-B

    So, we could have
    D6/9 Bbo7 Am9 D13b9 Gmaj7

    As a set of voicings to play here. If you have a good comp to play through the tune, you also have a good line.

    It's that line that moves chromatically, so if you want to get good at being a bit zen and get good at playing the harmony with minimal notes, it's good to take note of the notes that move chromatically through the song, and build lines based on that.
    Anyway, it's easy to make a meal of things like this. Ask yourself, what would Getz do? Play a melody, and paraphrase the tune... That seems true to the spirit of this music, rather than getting too theory minded.

  45. #44

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    Oh, and another addition to my post above: For me the note G is something like a pivoting point, I don't consider the whole bar as Bb diminished but only the first two beats. Despite the fact that the G and F# (and A too) technically fit in the Bb wt/ht, something turns there for my ears.

    So what I hear and consequently play is more like this:

    Chords analysis for Wave-wave-3-jpg

  46. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by DonEsteban
    Oh, and another addition to my post above: For me the note G is something like a pivoting point, I don't consider the whole bar as Bb diminished but only the first two beats. Despite the fact that the G and F# (and A too) technically fit in the Bb wt/ht, something turns there for my ears.

    So what I hear and consequently play is more like this:

    Chords analysis for Wave-wave-3-jpg
    I'd definitely agree, it's Bbo7 moving to an Am7 sound in the second half of the bar - both chords exist within the dim scale, but the dim scale has a more 'outside' sound which might work for some contexts, but Wave is a sort of happy go lucky thing...

    I posted my alternative scales - D harmonic major and B harmonic minor, and then played them and realised I didn't like them lol.

    I think in this case doing something simple is probably best... if you don't want the dim7 arp sound, just playing the Bb will give you the flavour of that chord.

  47. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by Black cat
    Check out Gilbert Medam on You Tube playing Wave. He plays the chords you would expect and takes a nice solo. I have heard a dozen versions and this one is true to Jobim.


    Black cat
    Everybody is worried about the harmony and which notes you can play. I didn't read one comment from anybody about the most important part of his playing: the swing (or soul, or heart and soul, or whatever you want to call it).

    You can get all of the same notes, but you'll PROBABLY never sound sound as good as him.

  48. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by eh6794-2.0
    Everybody is worried about the harmony and which notes you can play. I didn't read one comment from anybody about the most important part of his playing: the swing (or soul, or heart and soul, or whatever you want to call it).

    You can get all of the same notes, but you'll PROBABLY never sound sound as good as him.
    Clearly the reason many of us amateurs don't focus on "the most important part" because we know we WILL never sound as good as him.

    So instead we focus on what we believe we can master. But your point is well taken and one that I try to remind myself of each time I pick up a guitar. I.e. it isn't about the notes,,,, it about the sound!

  49. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by jameslovestal
    Clearly the reason many of us amateurs don't focus on "the most important part" because we know we WILL never sound as good as him.

    So instead we focus on what we believe we can master. But your point is well taken and one that I try to remind myself of each time I pick up a guitar. I.e. it isn't about the notes,,,, it about the sound!
    You'd be surprised how many people actually can. I want to hear more really good guitarists.

  50. #49

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    It is for the most parts V7 chords resolving down a fifth (sometimes secondary dominants, sometimes auxilary dominants), sometimes II- are put before the Vs.
    I've marked in the II-Vs with brackets under them (II-V to tritone sub with yellow/orange bracket) and V7 resolving down a fifth with an arrow.

    This is the gist of it, and the other "tricks" in the tune have already been covered in this thread
    Chords analysis for Wave-waveanalysis-png
    Last edited by orri; 09-23-2020 at 06:21 AM.

  51. #50

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    I did a video using Wave’s A section as an example that might interest: