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  1. #76

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    Quote Originally Posted by rpjazzguitar
    A friend of mine did graduate study in physics at UC Berkeley.

    He discontinued that education, went to medical school and has been a Professor for the last 20 years or so.

    Why did he leave UCB? He said, "There were a few people that really understood it. The rest of us were monkeys plugging numbers into equations."

    Sounds like a Berklee experience to me, based on acquaintance with players from each group.

    I'd add that based on my own experience with music and formal education in technical areas, jazz guitar is harder.
    Yeah, but that's what education/school is for. If everybody already "understood it" they wouldn't need to be there. It's also true that nobody fully absorbs or appreciates all the implications and ramifications of what they're taught in college until they've had at least 10 years of experience in the field, and maybe even more. Some portion of grad school is spent on refreshing what you were taught in undergrad and makes you say "oh yeah, that makes sense now. When I studied it the first time it just went in one ear and out the other".

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #77
    When I first moved to Boston in the seventies I thought I would do club work and study privately forgoing school. Well I lucked out and got a steady rock r and b type gig and loved it ,but I wanted to really improve and read well,etc. So I decided of course to go to Berklee. When I told my band guys and gave notice they said Dont go there! it will ruin your playing! As far as people playing scales,modes really fast instead of more by ear I see why they felt that way. I guess like Miles said you learn theory then forget that shit and play ! Split the difference I guess! I talked to Scofield on the phone and asked which books he liked and he said you cant learn jazz from a book. The best things I got from schools were meeting people from all over the world and learning how to teach myself all through life.

  4. #78

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    What I was trying to say is that the full-blown academic approach may find more fertile ground in some students than others. The right student may get something out of every single class. Another player, not so much. Probably true of every field, not just physics and jazz guitar.

    And, that's not a knock, necessarily, on the second kind of student. There are great players who don't know a single thing that Berklee teaches in words.

  5. #79

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    Please forgive my ignorance.
    I recently purchased this book, Joe Pass Guitar Chords from Alfred. In the Introduction it says all the chords are in the key of C. I can put a name to some of the major chords, but not all. Is there any resource with all the names put to these chords?

    I'm also a little confused about the discussion in this tread. I see that a number of people identify the various chords under "Seventh" as some kind of G7. I took the Introduction's notice that all chords are in the key of C, and have been trying to make sense of them as some variations of C7 but without much success. Does Joe mean that these are variations of the dominant chords in the key of C, meaning variations of G7? If so, what is the root of the chords that appear under Augmented and Diminished?

    Thanks for your help!

  6. #80

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    Quote Originally Posted by kenhan
    Please forgive my ignorance.
    I recently purchased this book, Joe Pass Guitar Chords from Alfred. In the Introduction it says all the chords are in the key of C. I can put a name to some of the major chords, but not all. Is there any resource with all the names put to these chords?

    I'm also a little confused about the discussion in this tread. I see that a number of people identify the various chords under "Seventh" as some kind of G7. I took the Introduction's notice that all chords are in the key of C, and have been trying to make sense of them as some variations of C7 but without much success. Does Joe mean that these are variations of the dominant chords in the key of C, meaning variations of G7? If so, what is the root of the chords that appear under Augmented and Diminished?

    Thanks for your help!
    A uniquely perverse book. They should have named the chords.

  7. #81

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles
    A uniquely perverse book. They should have named the chords.
    The 7th chords are all based on a G root, not C.

    The major chords are based on a C root.

    The m7b5 chords are based on a D root.

    I didn't look at the others.

    The good part about this book is that the selection of chord forms is really good. They're all pretty easily playable and will sound good.

    In the beginning Joe explains that these chord grips are the ones he uses when he sees a simple chord symbol. For example, when he sees Cmaj7 he may play any of the major type voicings.

    You need a little chord theory to make sense of this. A Cmaj7 is C E G B. And Joe has some with those notes. But, he will also add an A and a D. C6, Cmaj9, C69. He'll add an F# to those notes, which is a common thing to do in jazz. Apparently, Joe doesn't want you to worry about the names of all these notes. He wants you to recognize that all the grips will work.

    Same for the others. He basically gives a couple of dozen ways to play the G7 you see in the chart. They aren't all plain vanilla G7.

    What I think would have been helpful at a minimum is to circle the root. Then, you can find the same voicing in any key, if you know the notes on the fingerboard. But, he names the notes on each grid, so you can find the root and figure out the chord name.

    I'd encourage you to go ahead and figure all that stuff out and pencil it in. Then apply the voicings to tunes, paying close attention to the sounds.