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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
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    Peter he no like chord I

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    Thanks for sharing. I wonder if Peter would shift his comping to the mid register with a bass player. For instance, he plays lots of chords on the 6th, 4th and 3rd string, and sometimes adding a 5th string too. Would that interfere with a bass player? Thanks, jpb

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    I don't think Peter uses different shapes judging from this video, but perhaps he focuses a little more on the middle strings?'



    I think the main thing about the 6th string interfering with bass is a sonic issue. If you have too much bass on the amp it's a bit of a problem. So you can address that in a number of ways; you can change the sound in some way, or alter your voicings. Peter seems to be mostly picking the D and G strings.

    Interesting when he solos, he keeps hitting this low F octave on the Fm chord.

    He never seems to get in the way. Here is comping with Mike Stern, but seems very conscious of his volume level even though he is comping in the same register. Sometimes he'll just stroll and lay out. I notice he adjusts his amp before Mike's solo.

    Last edited by christianm77; 09-29-2020 at 10:39 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77

    Interesting when he solos, he keeps hitting this low F octave on the Fm chord. I mean that's the sort of thing they really tell you not to at music school lol.
    even at the music school where pete teaches? that's cold.

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    Quote Originally Posted by djg
    even at the music school where pete teaches? that's cold.
    Sorry to stereotype music school (but I will because you do hear this type of advice being taught on jazz courses all the time). Peter teaches in a less prohibitive and more contextual way.

    That low bass thing is something you hear pianists do a lot of occurs. Peter Bernstein is coming a lot out of Monk.

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Sorry to stereotype music school (but I will because you do hear this type of advice being taught on jazz courses all the time). Peter teaches in a less prohibitive and more contextual way.

    That low bass thing is something you hear pianists do a lot of occurs. Peter Bernstein is coming a lot out of Monk.

    when i think of the guitar departments of music schools i think of rodney jones at juillard, richie hart at berklee, pete at nyu, bollenback at peabody, MvI and van ruller in amsterdam. etc. i was fortunate to study with people like kenny napper and wim overgaauw. i also once organized a workshop with students from three jazz schools from three different countries, including the school in leeds. i think much of what you write about music schools is based on hear-say. why not name horse and rider instead of rather unfair generalizations like above? what actual music schools are you referring to?

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    Quote Originally Posted by djg
    when i think of the guitar departments of music schools i think of rodney jones at juillard, richie hart at berklee, pete at nyu, bollenback at peabody, MvI and van ruller in amsterdam. etc. i was fortunate to study with people like kenny napper and wim overgaauw. i also once organized a workshop with students from three jazz schools from three different countries, including the school in leeds. i think much of what you write about music schools is based on hear-say. why not name horse and rider instead of rather unfair generalizations like above? what actual music schools are you referring to?
    I've PM'd you about what I mean specifically, and removed the remark. It was kind of made in jest, but you are right, if I'm unwilling to give specifics, shouldn't really mention it. It's also derailed the thread from something MUCH more interesting.

    What I actually meant is you often hear jazz educators saying you shouldn't double the root. This is something people on the whole generally say to make less competent ensembles sound better; the question of whether or not these rules are helpful or not to learning players is a whole other thread.

    All I can say is, those teachers you cited you can rely on to give you the correct information because they are all brilliant players as well as teachers.
    Last edited by christianm77; 09-29-2020 at 10:52 AM.