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  1. #1

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    Hi. Is there any good software to harmonize a melody especially in a jazz style?

    Was thinking of inputting a melody probably via midi and then it could provide options of chords to match.

    I've seen a couple but just hoped you could provide a good list of one's I may have missed.

    Thanks.

    Nate

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    I would like to see that myself!

  4. #3

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    No! NO!! LOL. I'm pretty sure any notation software can do this. Sibelius for instance. You can chose to harmonize by 3rds, 4ths, 6ths, 2nds, whatever. Choose a bottom note or tom note, etc. Then listen. It works well.

  5. #4

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    I think he's talking about chord progressions rather than double stops or "part harmony".

    It is already being done now in the studio recording.
    Select "feelz" from a menu and the app composes.
    Sounds lifeless but it's the popular sound these days.

  6. #5
    So what I mean is - you enter/upload a melody by midi. The program then automatically suggests a chord progression that matches and it can play the piece at the press of a button.

    I know Mysong can do this and it seems ok.

    I just wonder if there's any other good software that can. Can band in a box do this?

    Any other good software?

    Thanks

    Nate

  7. #6
    Yeah. That's what I mean Paul thanks.

    I know it's probably a bit robotic and lifeless but it will help whilst I attempt to learn some jazz chordal harmony!

    Cheers

    Nate

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nate99
    Yeah. That's what I mean Paul thanks.

    I know it's probably a bit robotic and lifeless but it will help whilst I attempt to learn some jazz chordal harmony!

    Cheers

    Nate
    I think you will grasp much more if you play the melody until your own ear begins to compose possible chord progressions, then transcribe what's in your ear and evaluate them as you play them and experiment. The idea that "there's an app for that" largely defeats the learning process.

  9. #8

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    Oh no. Seriously no. Sorry. That’s a terrible idea. Carry on.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  10. #9
    Thanks. I'm having a really hard time hearing the chords to accompany the melody.

    I can easily transcribe melodies in my head and some of the simpler chords.

    I try to arpeggiate the chords slowly in my mind and then transcribe - with varying degrees of success.

    Anything else that would help?
    I'm using functional ear trainer, that helps a little.

    What amount of theory is necessary/needed?

    I guess commiting things like the circle of fourths and fifths to memory would help, anything else?

    Cheers

    Nate

  11. #10

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    Hi, I am trying to do exactly the same thing by longhand. Have decided I need to go back to complete 'basics' to try and do this and ordered the following book,

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Harmonising...g=hydrukspg-21

    Don't know if this approach will work in a jazz context, but some good stuff to learn even if it doesn't,

    Cheers, Si

  12. #11

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    You get better at it the more you do. If you go the extremely stupid route and look for a software program to do it for you, your ear and mind won't really develop like it should. You will always learning to use something OUTSIDE of yourself to find those musical solutions for you and you end up just being mediocre and undeveloped. Yeah I suppose you can get there form here, but it's much less rewarding.

  13. #12

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    'I try to arpeggiate the chords slowly in my mind and then transcribe - with varying degrees of success."

    Don't do that, you are only teaching your ear to hear slowly and not hear chords.
    You want to hear / recognize chord harmonies as wholes, instantly, successfully.

  14. #13

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    I would suggest the following:

    Decide in your mind your best guess of the harmonic rhythm (where chords are likely or possibly going to change).
    At each point, audition bass notes and keep a list of all that sound intriguing at each location.
    Then begin trying different combinations till you arrive at something pleasing.
    If the composition is in a major or minor key center, insert all the definitive arrivals on the I chord.
    For the rest audition different chord qualities and keep a list of candidates as you did with the bass notes.
    When done, listen to different combinations till you find something you like.
    If there are lyrics, they will sometimes steer towards a degree of tension, delayed resolution or resolution.

    This might seem arduous but you will be a wiser musician for it and while exploring your own aesthetic choices
    as opposed to having a machine spoon feed you what is likely to be a generic interpretation.

    Another possibility is to find a harmonically skilled collaborator. I work with one excellent singer who sends me a cappella renderings of her new songs to which I put together guitar arrangements.

    Best long term solution is to commit to develop these skills for yourself.

  15. #14
    Thanks for that - The hard slog pays off in the end!

  16. #15

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    Choose the kind of chords and movements you want to focus on, and start recording 2 minute long random progressions on your phone. Next day, try to play along to that. Repeat. You'll see tremendous progress after a while in your ability to hear chord qualities and root motion intervals.

    A better way to work on learning applied Harmony is to get a hold of some theory books or lessons, focus on specific subjects one at a time, and start composing melodies on the chord progression you are working on. Also analyze some tunes.

  17. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Alter
    Choose the kind of chords and movements you want to focus on, and start recording 2 minute long random progressions on your phone. Next day, try to play along to that. Repeat. You'll see tremendous progress after a while in your ability to hear chord qualities and root motion intervals.

    A better way to work on learning applied Harmony is to get a hold of some theory books or lessons, focus on specific subjects one at a time, and start composing melodies on the chord progression you are working on. Also analyze some tunes.
    Thanks I'll try that.