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  1. #51
    Here is a comping on Rhythm Changes lesson by Peter Bernstein:

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175
    Here is a comping on Rhythm Changes lesson by Peter Bernstein:
    Believe it or not, I actually transcribed that chorus when the unedited session first appeared and posted it the next day to the FB Peter Bernstein Study Group:

    Jazz recordings with masterful comping-rhythm-changes-bernstein-jpg

  4. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    well i think we're getting into semantics here...the actual dictionary definition of comping is-

    "the action of playing a musical accompaniment, especially in jazz or blues."

    covered!!
    I've also seen the word 'comping' described as a contraction of 'complementing' and that term suggests to me a more interactive process than 'accompanying'.

  5. #54

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    I discovered a great Dean Martin album (Dream of Dean) a few years back with him and a small trio, but mostly featuring a very smooth guitar who I later discovered was also Barney Kessel and it got me to searching for other CDs like this as I love the minimalness and beauty of just a singer and guitar.

    Another is "the Intimate Ms Christy" with June Christy and Al Viola and is one worth getting. The Julie London CD in this list is another I don't have so thanks for that!!

    There are a couple Sammy Davis albums, one Bossa style with Laurindo Almeida and another electric guitar only with Mundell Lowe that are both just Sammy and guitar and both very good.

    Would appreciated any leads on other CDs out there like that? Thanks in advance!

  6. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sundeep
    I discovered a great Dean Martin album (Dream of Dean) a few years back with him and a small trio, but mostly featuring a very smooth guitar who I later discovered was also Barney Kessel and it got me to searching for other CDs like this as I love the minimalness and beauty of just a singer and guitar.

    Another is "the Intimate Ms Christy" with June Christy and Al Viola and is one worth getting. The Julie London CD in this list is another I don't have so thanks for that!!

    There are a couple Sammy Davis albums, one Bossa style with Laurindo Almeida and another electric guitar only with Mundell Lowe that are both just Sammy and guitar and both very good.

    Would appreciated any leads on other CDs out there like that? Thanks in advance!
    There were a number of albums released from the mid '50s to early '60s featuring singers with jazz guitar & bass accompaniment. Here are a few that come to mind:

    Julie Is Her Name
    (Vols. 1 & 2) - Julie London with Barney Kessel(1) and Howard Roberts(2)
    After Hours
    - Sarah Vaughan with Mundell Lowe
    Sarah + 2 - Sarah Vaughan with Barney Kessel
    Portrait of Sheila - Sheila Jordan with Barry Galbraith
    Folk Songs A La King - Morgana King with Chuck Wayne

    I'm sure there are plenty of other titles that escape me for the moment. Beverly Kenney Sings For Johnny Smith is a quartet date from the same period but Kenney and Smith provide the main interest.

  7. #56

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    Yea... better examples of comping. personally as much as I love Peter's playing...his comping is... ? not his thing.

    I mean It's a style than many guitarist use... somewhat like a default stay out of the way and fill in the middle. Which after the first few choruses... almost gets in the way.

    I believe most guitarist don't comp that well because they generally start from the root... and never really leave.
    By that I mean they embellish the notes on top of that root, rather than embellish using organized harmonic relationships. When you approach comping like soloing from an embellishment style... it gets harmonically muddy.
    If your going to try and improv while comping... the improve needs to have clean harmonic lines of relationships and development. It not like soloing improv, where your out front and can use the rest of the players as a pedal like effect.

    You can use established lick like comping patterns, because they have a harmonic established references. Think like Chord Patterns.... they already have established harmonic references.

    The other side is the rhythmic thing.... you need to be aware of the tunes style or feel which is the Harmonic Rhythm.... the rhythm pattern of the tune being played... has and implies harmony for those attacks.... those attacks create the strong side of Harmonic rhythm. If your going to create a different harmonic line or chord movement that's not part of that Harmonic rhythm....The Weak side....that's where you bring it in, usually also with organization...but do what you can.

    If you aren't in to the harmony or theory thing... at least get the rhythmic thing together.

  8. #57

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    Do you have a recommendation for a record Reg?

  9. #58

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    Sure ... most of the great pianist. sorry lol

    maybe old John Pisano... here's an example with Joe Pass. Needs to be at least 30 years ago....


    I think Fareed approach is good.

    Burrell
    kessel
    Bird
    Ellis
    Early Bensen
    Malone
    Me

    In general... not guitarist.

  10. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by Reg
    Sure ... most of the great pianist. sorry lol

    maybe old John Pisano... here's an example with Joe Pass. Needs to be at least 30 years ago....


    I think Fareed approach is good.


    In general... not guitarist.
    That's great comping. Time feel is great. I like the way he keeps it well in the background, lower octave than the solo, and gets a smooth sound.

  11. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by rpjazzguitar
    That's great comping. Time feel is great. I like the way he keeps it well in the background, lower octave than the solo, and gets a smooth sound.
    Yes, great time feel in the comping.

    Both the bossa nova and swing sections of the comping are very groove based. We've been making a distinction between improvized accompanyment vs rhythm guitar. This sort of falls in between. I guess the more you limit improvization in the accompaniment, the less chances there is to get in the way of the soloist.

    But sometimes getting in the way makes the whole arrangement sound more interesting to the audience. Is the only goal of the rhythm section make the job of the soloist easier or is it to elevate the performance for the audience? Of course it's tempting to say that, "both, because they are the same things" but is it? May be sometimes the soloist just have to concentrate more and plow through adventurous comping.

    PS. Joe Pass is using the middle position of the pickup selector. I really like that position on my ES 175 as well.

  12. #61

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    I enjoyed Pisano’s comping here, uber supportive. I have to confess I don’t know his playing, so will check out more stuff.

    I sometimes play with people who get in the way. Reflecting on it, I wonder if it’s good that I have to go away from my usual situation and play in a different way and might end up sounding more interesting even as I find it a bit annoying.

  13. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    I enjoyed Pisano’s comping here, uber supportive. I have to confess I don’t know his playing, so will check out more stuff.

    I sometimes play with people who get in the way. Reflecting on it, I wonder if it’s good that I have to go away from my usual situation and play in a different way and might end up sounding more interesting even as I find it a bit annoying.
    John Pisano is second guitarist on the Joe Pass album, For Django and that definitely deserves being placed on the list of 'jazz recordings with masterful comping'.

    There's a pretty fine line sometimes between 'reactive' and 'proactive' comping. I suppose it's like any conversation - go with the flow and occasionally drop in new ideas/thoughts to keep the ball rolling. Some personalities are suited to the role. For instance, one of the most selfless guys I've met and had the pleasure to play with on the scene is Los Angeles guitarist, Larry Koonse. It's no surprise that Larry (who also has impeccable technique) is on countless albums accompanying singers.

  14. #63

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    Here's a vid of gig... I was subbing on, the mandolin player is a friend. They're a memorize approach band, obviously that's not my approach, but I have fun in any setting...

  15. #64

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    Yea... better examples of comping. personally as much as I love Peter's playing...his comping is... ? not his thing
    Well.. for me it is really HIS thing...

    I really like the way he does it... of course I like your vid and example with Joe Pisano too

    But what Peter does responds to my time feel in general... I always had a bit loose and probably for someone 'muddy' time feel... I like when it is on the edge of being lost.

    I am not pro of course and do not play a lot with others so I do not feel competent as you are from player's point of view...

    But as a listner I really enjoy Petre's comping and interacting with soloist.. I enjoy it asa musical result of... how it all procedes musically

    It is probably even the most important thing about it

  16. #65

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    Hehe I thought Reg was trolling.

  17. #66

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    Hey Jonah...Yea I like pushing buttons, get it out etc... And I love Perter's playing also... who doesn't. He a great musician, one of the better ambassadors of guitar..... But I don't like just playing I V types of harmony with embellishments either...I like the subdominant areas.

    That loose, muddy or somewhat lost feel is great for soloing.... but generally not that great for accompanying. There is a difference of what's implied by harmonic and rhythmic combinations.... when used with embellishment approach basically the use of relative min. and b9 and using different relative relationships and functional movementt from.

    What make a Blues to you... is it I V or I IV ? (I'm not just pushing buttons... really).

  18. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by Reg
    Hey Jonah...Yea I like pushing buttons, get it out etc... And I love Perter's playing also... who doesn't. He a great musician, one of the better ambassadors of guitar..... But I don't like just playing I V types of harmony with embellishments either...I like the subdominant areas.

    That loose, muddy or somewhat lost feel is great for soloing.... but generally not that great for accompanying. There is a difference of what's implied by harmonic and rhythmic combinations.... when used with embellishment approach basically the use of relative min. and b9 and using different relative relationships and functional movementt from.

    What make a Blues to you... is it I V or I IV ? (I'm not just pushing buttons... really).
    Sure I know what you mean I think... and about blues too...

    I think maybe the important thing is that I guess Peter (and possibly me) refers to it in a different way...
    I actually hear a lot of blues there..

    I think it is important that for him it probably does not matter.... I mean he does not hear as you analyzed that.... I suppose
    He would understand this of course but he does not relate to that...

    his comping sounds to me like a 'counterpoint thick melody' and I feel like he just thinks of it as of melody... all conviction comes from that melodic statement of a phrase and rythm is related to that melodic statement... if one hears it that way there is no problem with time which is always there .. to me this kind of elusive playing determins time even better becasue it does not show it litterally - it feels behind it... and this is what music is about imho

    but generally not that great for accompanying.

    there is not general rule... for real music ... maybe there is one for a working session pro player to fit industry standards.. but real achievemnets in music are not about fitting industry standards...

    again I hear he sounds good in comping in real music context... and to be honest I do not care whether his bandmates feel comfortable with his compoing or not... this is social stuff... some probably do, some do not... those who do - play with him.. those who don't - don't...

    . I care about great performance

  19. #68

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    Guys, you NEED to check out Matt Munisteri - a MONSTER player/musician in all respects. Listen here :



    There is plenty more with him and "The Earregulars"

  20. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by Reg
    Here's a vid of gig... I was subbing on, the mandolin player is a friend. They're a memorize approach band, obviously that's not my approach, but I have fun in any setting...

    Nice...dug the guitar and mando work...don't recognize that mando...almost looks like a Collings with a matte finish bit with a floating type pick-up..who is playing mandolin?

  21. #70

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    Totally underrated, but his chord voicings and compositions are exceptional. I'm not a big fan of his improv solos.

    Listen to him comp for the bass solo.


  22. #71

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    Holdsworth owns his own Universe.

  23. #72

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    uys, you NEED to check out Matt Munisteri - a MONSTER player/musician in all respects. Listen here :
    Matt is great.

    He is some kind of HIPP representative in jazz field for me (with all the pros and cons of it)))

  24. #73

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    Quote Originally Posted by alltunes
    Nice...dug the guitar and mando work...don't recognize that mando...almost looks like a Collings with a matte finish bit with a floating type pick-up..who is playing mandolin?
    tom bekeny

  25. #74

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    Quote Originally Posted by GuyBoden
    Totally underrated, but his chord voicings and compositions are exceptional. I'm not a big fan of his improv solos.

    Listen to him comp for the bass solo.

    with all my respect, this is more an antipattern of comping. The guitar exclusively dominates the bass solo, not just because the bad mix, but also the continous voice leading with the intense reverb an effect high pitch melody practically could be a stand alone solo which competes and beats the bass solo. Sad and excentic attitude. Also no traces of reacting or accompanying what the bass player tries to say. I practically felt sorry for the bass player while listening...

  26. #75

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    Quote Originally Posted by Reg
    Hey Jonah...Yea I like pushing buttons, get it out etc... And I love Perter's playing also... who doesn't. He a great musician, one of the better ambassadors of guitar..... But I don't like just playing I V types of harmony with embellishments either...I like the subdominant areas.

    That loose, muddy or somewhat lost feel is great for soloing.... but generally not that great for accompanying. There is a difference of what's implied by harmonic and rhythmic combinations.... when used with embellishment approach basically the use of relative min. and b9 and using different relative relationships and functional movementt from.

    What make a Blues to you... is it I V or I IV ? (I'm not just pushing buttons... really).
    Peter will, at a push, acknowledge the existence of the IV chord.

  27. #76

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    Having played with Peter in a lesson, there is nothing vague about Peter’s time feel.

    If the music needs to have a clear pulse, he will do that. If he’s playing more interactively, he will access more complex rhythms but they are all locked in.

    He is a breeze to play with, but as an educator can call you on your shit time, if required, without needing to say anything.

  28. #77

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabor
    with all my respect, this is more an antipattern of comping. The guitar exclusively dominates the bass solo, not just because the bad mix, but also the continous voice leading with the intense reverb an effect high pitch melody practically could be a stand alone solo which competes and beats the bass solo. Sad and excentic attitude. Also no traces of reacting or accompanying what the bass player tries to say. I practically felt sorry for the bass player while listening...
    Allan tended to record albums with overdubs. So interaction in the moment was clearly not so important to him.

    I find his comping to be quite ‘paddy’ like a string section. Or a synth.

  29. #78

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    Quote Originally Posted by gitman
    Guys, you NEED to check out Matt Munisteri - a MONSTER player/musician in all respects. Listen here :



    There is plenty more with him and "The Earregulars"
    Munisteri is really good. Lovely style of playing.

  30. #79

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Allan tended to record albums with overdubs. So interaction in the moment was clearly not so important to him.

    I find his comping to be quite ‘paddy’ like a string section. Or a synth.
    ...and again poor bass player...
    I can not stand to not associate masturbation vs real love making...

  31. #80

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabor
    ...and again poor bass player...
    I can not stand to not associate masturbation vs real love making...
    That's a very disrespectful statement to apply to such an accomplished and pioneering musician as the late Allan Holdsworth.

    He's not everyone's cup of tea, but please show some respect and humanity.

  32. #81

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    This

  33. #82
    Quote Originally Posted by takefive
    This
    I don't know I find this kind of comping a bit distracting. I takes attention away from the solo without any interaction. I guess it's fine in a duo context if done sparingly.
    It's basically stride piano on guitar right? Of course it's stylistically well suited to Gypsy jazz/swing contexts.

  34. #83

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175
    I don't know I find this kind of comping a bit distracting. I takes attention away from the solo without any interaction. I guess it's fine in a duo context if done sparingly.
    It's basically stride piano on guitar right? Of course it's stylistically well suited to Gypsy jazz/swing contexts.
    Holy shit, that’s the way people played guitar in 1942. And he does it great. Bebop comping hadn’t been invented yet.

    Also bird is still clearly indebted to swing era Sax players like Lester Young at this point. Notice how on the beat his phrasing is.

    no pleasing some people lol

  35. #84
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Holy shit, that’s the way people played guitar in 1942. And he does it great. Bebop comping hadn’t been invented yet.

    Also bird is still clearly indebted to swing era Sax players like Lester Young at this point. Notice how on the beat his phrasing is.

    no pleasing some people lol
    Yeah it's probably just me. I don't listen to much of anything before bebop and after post-bop/hard-bop. If I go outside of this range, I'm more likely to go towards the more modern side rather than the older.

  36. #85

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    Yea, and that was only 80 years ago.
    What's cool...I is still sub and perform with bands like that, and when the tempos get up, that's where we go.... all back of the bus and extremely straight. I still dig it, it fun... I tend to do that rocket to the moon thing, keep the rhythm very straight or use the pre-fab tripled or 3 groupings patterns with longer straight rhythmic targets. And then have fun with the changes...
    I mean... how many choruses do you take on Cherokee... lots. yea make the first few choruses beautiful while everyone catches they're breath. I mean that bridge... it's just hard to hold back.

  37. #86

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175
    I don't know I find this kind of comping a bit distracting. I takes attention away from the solo without any interaction. I guess it's fine in a duo context if done sparingly.
    It's basically stride piano on guitar right? Of course it's stylistically well suited to Gypsy jazz/swing contexts.
    I think it could sound distracting to our ears...


    Very important wrords you said about 'any interaction'.

    Actually .. (with my also classical background and baroque continou copming) i find that the origins of jazz/rock/pop styles all include 'rhythm section' - which is reall about general pulse... in rock music they do not interact much too - they just keep the pulse

    In baroque it is quite the oppsite in my opinion (whatever modern rock-influenced baroque players try to impose) -- it is all the time (and they react and interact all the time... it is very flexible time)...

    And modern jazz is much in between imho... often that pulse is just meant and intended but not played straightly but it should be felt behind somehow

  38. #87

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Holy shit, that’s the way people played guitar in 1942. And he does it great. Bebop comping hadn’t been invented yet.

    Also bird is still clearly indebted to swing era Sax players like Lester Young at this point. Notice how on the beat his phrasing is.

    no pleasing some people lol
    Forget the guitar playing, that's just choice early Bird! Always loved that solo. As you say, a beautiful transition between Lester Young and his later mature style.

    True that bebop comping wasn't yet a thing but one guitarist who bridged that gap - Barney Kessel regarded him as 'the missing link' between swing and bop - is Oscar Moore. As great as they were, players like George Van Eps and Allan Reuss mostly split their duties between playing 'rhythm' and chordal solos when working in an ensemble context but Moore mixed that all up in his early trio work with Nat King Cole.

  39. #88

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    Well that kind of goes to my point about rhythm guitar not being comping.

    people who don’t listen to pre war jazz I don’t think realise how different - archaic - it sounds right up till the recording ban. Much more locked in. Particularly important is the different style of drumming.

    So given we had progressive swing Sax players like Don Byas I’m tempted to say the great transforming genius of bebop was not Charlie Parker but Kenny Clarke whose switch to the new ride cymbal completely redefined the sound of the rhythm section and made the new comping style possible. It is also a hell of a lot easier to play bebop phrases with a more bop rhythm section. Again hear at how locked in Bird is in 1942 compared to after the war.

    Anyway one box set that’s quite interesting to get a sense of how much jazz rhythm section playing evolved in just a few years is Coleman Hawkins the Bebop Years.
    Last edited by christianm77; 03-27-2020 at 05:48 AM.

  40. #89

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    Quote Originally Posted by PMB
    Forget the guitar playing, that's just choice early Bird! Always loved that solo. As you say, a beautiful transition between Lester Young and his later mature style.

    True that bebop comping wasn't yet a thing but one guitarist who bridged that gap - Barney Kessel regarded him as 'the missing link' between swing and bop - is Oscar Moore. As great as they were, players like George Van Eps and Allan Reuss mostly split their duties between playing 'rhythm' and chordal solos when working in an ensemble context but Moore mixed that all up in his early trio work with Nat King Cole.
    Oscar Moore is underrated for sure. That line up - guitar/piano/bass was massively popular in the 40s and 50s to judge from the discography. Was it Bill Evans who put us out of a gig, or Ahmad Jamal?

    I always bang on about this bit there is such a thing as bop rhythm guitar which I think of as a very different style to the 1940s thing.

    Generally it happens when there’s no drums - such that trio format - and it shows Kenny Clarke’s influence in evolution from the train-like ‘boom chick’ of that 1940s Parker recording to the smooth automotive glide of post war swing. It’s one of my favourite styles.







    tal in particular sounds like a trap set

    Listening to Pisanos comping above I’m stuck by how it represents a slight loosening of the rhythm guitar approach but retains its groove.

  41. #90

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175
    Please post tunes/recordings where comping (guitar or piano) has great educational value.
    I am not interested in masterful comping. I am interested in effective comping with good placement of the chords.

    Listen to the most elementary of jazz chords being played by Doug Raney when he is comping in the classic Chet Baker Trio recordings. Mostly the basic root 6 and root 5 chords you learn when you start out. He does not even leave the roots out.

    Doug comps with these basic voicings all the way through his classic recordings with Chet Baker. NOTHING fancy and still highly effective. I do the same in my own Chet Baker Tribute Trio.

    When I first listened to his comping I was amazed at the simplicity of his voicings. But it works great.

    DB


  42. #91

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    Quote Originally Posted by GuyBoden
    That's a very disrespectful statement to apply to such an accomplished and pioneering musician as the late Allan Holdsworth.

    He's not everyone's cup of tea, but please show some respect and humanity.
    Yep, I agree, the only person jerking off here is this idiot!

  43. #92

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    Quote Originally Posted by DB's Jazz Guitar Blog
    I am not interested in masterful comping. I am interested in effective comping with good placement of the chords.

    Listen to the most elementary of jazz chords being played by Doug Raney when he is comping in the classic Chet Baker Trio recordings. Mostly the basic root 6 and root 5 chords you learn when you start out. He does not even leave the roots out.

    Doug comps with these basic voicings all the way through his classic recordings with Chet Baker. NOTHING fancy and still highly effective. I do the same in my own Chet Baker Tribute Trio.

    When I first listened to his comping I was amazed at the simplicity of his voicings. But it works great.

    DB

    Sure that not doubling the root thing has always been bollocks. Same for piano players.

  44. #93

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Holy shit, that’s the way people played guitar in 1942. And he does it great. Bebop comping hadn’t been invented yet.

    Also bird is still clearly indebted to swing era Sax players like Lester Young at this point. Notice how on the beat his phrasing is.

    no pleasing some people lol
    I love playing swing rhythms. Swing rhythms and bluesy bop solos.

  45. #94

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    DB - Thanks for posting the Chet Baker stuff. I'm an old dude, former trumpet player now working on guitar again for fun - the instrument I first played when I was 10 - before the elementary school band gave me a trumpet and ruined my life...

    Having a Chet tribute trio, you are probably familiar with his 1957 instrumental version of Little Girl Blue accompanied by Dave Wheat on guitar. I had to bold and underline the "comp" part - for fun - because of this discussion on "comping" which can mean a lot of different things.

    Dave Wheat's accompaniment of Chet is a work of art. For those not familiar, it's just a duo with Chet being Chet and Wheat laying down a sweet accompaniment. The thing about it, from a trumpet player's perspective is that Wheat really lays down the time like clockwork - sometimes with just one note to keep it moving forward - which makes it so much easier for Chet to be free in all of his phrasing and precise in his timing.

    There is another instrumental version where Chet plays with a pianist and it seems to me the piano isn't locking in the time. He's playing too freely which makes it difficult for Chet to lock in. Chet seems to be waiting for the piano and I think it puts him off.

    In any case, I thought some of you might like to hear Dave Wheat. I had to go to the album to look up who the guitar player was, then to the web to get his background. From Wikipedia -

    David "Buck" Wheat (1922–1985) was an American folk and jazz musician, songwriter and recording artist. The Texas-born Wheat was a well-known guitarist and bass player with the big dance bands of the era, playing at the Chicago Playboy Jazz Festival 1959 in The Playboy Jazz All Stars and the Chet Baker Trio. He was also bassist with the Kingston Trio - the 4th person on stage.

    Jeff


  46. #95

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Well that kind of goes to my point about rhythm guitar not being comping.

    people who don’t listen to pre war jazz I don’t think realise how different - archaic - it sounds right up till the recording ban. Much more locked in. Particularly important is the different style of drumming.

    So given we had progressive swing Sax players like Don Byas I’m tempted to say the great transforming genius of bebop was not Charlie Parker but Kenny Clarke whose switch to the new ride cymbal completely redefined the sound of the rhythm section and made the new comping style possible. It is also a hell of a lot easier to play bebop phrases with a more bop rhythm section. Again hear at how locked in Bird is in 1942 compared to after the war.

    Anyway one box set that’s quite interesting to get a sense of how much jazz rhythm section playing evolved in just a few years is Coleman Hawkins the Bebop Years.
    If Miles is to be believed, it was both Kenny Clarke and Charlie Christian. The Proper Hawkins box set is excellent as is Scott DeVeaux's book covering that transitional period, The Birth of Bebop.

  47. #96

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    No love for Wes on this thread? He's my all time favorite string comping player.

  48. #97

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    Quote Originally Posted by Low Strung
    DB - Thanks for posting the Chet Baker stuff. I'm an old dude, former trumpet player now working on guitar again for fun - the instrument I first played when I was 10 - before the elementary school band gave me a trumpet and ruined my life...
    David "Buck" Wheat (1922–1985) was an American folk and jazz musician, songwriter and recording artist. The Texas-born Wheat was a well-known guitarist and bass player with the big dance bands of the era, playing at the Chicago Playboy Jazz Festival 1959 in The Playboy Jazz All Stars and the Chet Baker Trio. He was also bassist with the Kingston Trio - the 4th person on stage.

    Jeff

    I must admit I have not heard this track before. We mostly concentrate on Chet's trio work in the late 70s and mid 80s with Doug Raney and Philippe Catherine on guitar. So thanks for the heads up for this track. Very sweet!

    DB

  49. #98

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    "You should never hear the guitar by itself. It should be part of the drums so it sounds like the drummer is playing chords—like the snare is in A or the hi-hat in D minor"—?Freddie Green





  50. #99

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    People keep talking about rhythm guitar haha

    But I love that FG quote. Although he doesn’t half stick out when you know what to listen for.

  51. #100

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    Man... I listened to the SDMPWC vid by DB with Rainey and Pedersen... sorry... time was not very good and if Pedersen hadn't been play... it would have been lousy. I generally love Raney's playing...

    I agree with DB's approach, especially in that setting. I also play tons of no drums gigs, (well use to), but the mixing and somewhat non organized use of rhythmic attack patterns ....almost awkward, was hard to take.

    Am I the only one hearing this?