1. #1

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    What’s the difference between a G7 and a G major seven chord? I assumed that a G chord with a seven behind it would be a G major seven. Could somebody explain to me the difference and how they are typically written?

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    it's the same, just remove the seventh

    PS : When we write GMaj7, it means that the chord is major because it has a major third, and the seventh one too. G7, the chord is major (major third) with a seventh minor (b7). Same for Gm7, the third and seventh are minor

  4. #3

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    G7 is a Dominant 7th chord. The 7th of the chord is flatted. In the key of G, the 7th scale degree is F#. Flatting the F# gives you F natural.
    G7 = G, B, D, F
    Dominant 7th chords are built on the Root, 3rd, 5th and flatted 7th notes of the scale.

    GMaj7 is a Major 7th chord. Major 7th chords are built on the Root, 3rd, 5th and 7th of the scale.
    GMaj7 = G, B, D, F#

    Major chords sound "happy." Dominant 7th chords sound like they need to resolve to another chord.

  5. #4

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary explains everything.

    Gmaj7, a major seventh, is formed from the first, third, fifth and seventh.
    G7, a dominant seventh, is identical, except the seventh is flat.

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulieBoy
    G7 is a Dominant 7th chord. The 7th of the chord is flatted. In the key of G, the 7th scale degree is F#. Flatting the F# gives you F natural.
    G7 = G, B, D, F
    Dominant 7th chords are built on the Root, 3rd, 5th and flatted 7th notes of the scale.

    GMaj7 is a Major 7th chord. Major 7th chords are built on the Root, 3rd, 5th and 7th of the scale.
    GMaj7 = G, B, D, F#

    Major chords sound "happy." Dominant 7th chords sound like they need to resolve to another chord.
    There should be an award for forum members who answer questions clearly, concisely, and with an example to avoid any misunderstanding. I nominate you, PaulieBoy, for this award.

  7. #6

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    Thanks for replying. Paulieboys explanation makes sense to me. I’m definitely going to check out that chord dictionary.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack E Blue
    There should be an award for forum members who answer questions clearly, concisely, and with an example to avoid any misunderstanding. I nominate you, PaulieBoy, for this award.
    Thanks for the kind words! I'm always happy to help.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulieBoy
    Thanks for the kind words! I'm always happy to help.
    Lots of people are happy to help, but not all are able to even though they have the best intentions. You understood that the OP didn't have a grasp of a very basic concept that most of us learned so long ago that we don't remember not having known it. Then you explained it very clearly and gave examples. And you did it without any condescension or smart-assiness.

    If you're not a teacher of some sort you should be.

  10. #9

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    Go search "Book of Eli"'s soundtrack in Youtube. The 1st song has a major chord for minutes. Test with your own added notes. With both - major 7th and flat 7th.
    The funny thing is, if you choose the flat 7th, it turns the chord into dominant 7, but this case it doesn't want to resolve to anywhere. Your own note wants to go to that chord's 1st degree but that's it.
    Sometimes the function depends on the context.
    There are also cases where a minor chord sounds happy... If I can remember this by Monday, I'll gonna fetch a nice example from my workplace I don't remember that trick right now..