1. #1

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    My chord vocabulary is quite limited. I understand chords, but I'm all over the neck because I can't find them in position and I can't really stretch five frets. Ted Greene's Chord Chemistry didn't help me at all. I'd like to find a resource that presents inversions in context, for instance turnarounds, cadences and the like. Something pragmatic that I can put to work right away. Three-note voicings would be sufficient. Thanks in advance for any recommendations.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    The Mickey Baker book. Most of the chords in the 1st book don't involve big stretches. You can skip the infamous Gmaj7 voicing which is a big stretch. Plenty of alternatives for that chord.

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by buduranus2
    My chord vocabulary is quite limited. I understand chords, but I'm all over the neck because I can't find them in position and I can't really stretch five frets. Ted Greene's Chord Chemistry didn't help me at all. I'd like to find a resource that presents inversions in context, for instance turnarounds, cadences and the like. Something pragmatic that I can put to work right away. Three-note voicings would be sufficient. Thanks in advance for any recommendations.

    Too easy. Ted Greene was a chord nerd extraordinaire. There was/is no need for anyone to ever do everything that he did or tried to do. He showed a lot of possibilities for the instrument though.


    So try these. When/if you get to a stretchy one - just skip it or sub it! (The Practical Jazz Guitarist)

    https://www.amazon.com/Leading-Guita...708514&sr=8-36

    https://www.amazon.com/Swing-Big-Ban...3708554&sr=8-1

    https://www.amazon.com/All-Blues-Jaz...3708582&sr=8-1

  5. #4

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    I'm with Frank on the Mickey Baker book. All those chords can easily be reduced to 3-note shell voicings.

  6. #5

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  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by fep
    The Mickey Baker book. Most of the chords in the 1st book don't involve big stretches. You can skip the infamous Gmaj7 voicing which is a big stretch. Plenty of alternatives for that chord.
    Right back where I started years ago, but will dig a little deeper and with a more informed perspective.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack E Blue
    I'm with Frank on the Mickey Baker book. All those chords can easily be reduced to 3-note shell voicings.
    Thanks for reminding me about shell voicings. Much more manageable.

    These are good resources, but a little difficult for me to process because they're laid-out like scales (horizontal) rather than as I'm used to seeing chords (vertical.)

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzstdnt
    Too easy. Ted Greene was a chord nerd extraordinaire. There was/is no need for anyone to ever do everything that he did or tried to do. He showed a lot of possibilities for the instrument though.


    So try these. When/if you get to a stretchy one - just skip it or sub it! (The Practical Jazz Guitarist)

    https://www.amazon.com/Leading-Guita...708514&sr=8-36

    https://www.amazon.com/Swing-Big-Ban...3708554&sr=8-1

    https://www.amazon.com/All-Blues-Jaz...3708582&sr=8-1
    Thanks for the recommendations. The "Moving Through Changes" book is, according to an on-line review, "written entirely in Standard Notation with suggested fingering for the Chords." When it comes to chords, I'm still a "dots in boxes" player. The "Swing Big Band" book seems tantalizing. I'd love to be able to walk the chords like Freddie Green. Would like to have a peek inside, though. That said, I found a link here that I could use right away. I just started on Fly Me to the Moon two days ago!


  9. #8

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    I don't like 4 fret or more finger spans which is probably going to limit my chording choices. I like everything within 3 frets. So delighted to find the moveable C minor 7 inversion chord (xx5546). Is there a chord app that let's you choose only chords played within 3 or 4 frets?

  10. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by fep
    The Mickey Baker book. Most of the chords in the 1st book don't involve big stretches. You can skip the infamous Gmaj7 voicing which is a big stretch. Plenty of alternatives for that chord.
    I got into the MB book last night and remembered what I didn't like about it. The chord diagrams are very small, there aren't any Roman numerals to indicate the frets, and no suggested fingerings. Also, the grids are hand-drawn, so they're a little irregular. Overall, very hard for me to read.