Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Posts 51 to 95 of 95
  1. #51

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Webby View Post
    I'm not so sure about that:
    Here are a couple of screen captures from that video. The action is exceptionally high, as is especially evident from the distance they move when fretting. He doesn’t fret the 6th string at all here.


    "We've only got one tough rule in this band . And that's that cat that plays that guitar. See, everybody's got to listen to him, you know. And he ain't going to let you go nooo...where. Keeps you right straight...can't move. Keeps it together" — Count Basie
    Last edited by KirkP; 07-25-2019 at 12:44 PM.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    I’m just saying cellists kick sand in our faces.
    And bassists. Jimmy Garrison’s pinky looked like it was on steroids.

    Big Band Playing unplugged?-762908c3-7aa3-4f97-9839-9aca5c28c081-jpg

  4. #53

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    I’ve used a tele for gigs like that
    How did you set it up? I can‘t really get a swing rhythm sound out of mine.


    Gesendet von iPad mit Tapatalk

  5. #54

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    I’ve used a tele for gigs like that
    I’ve used my tele for big band, but the attack and decay/sustain didn’t work for me on swing tunes. Perhaps I could have adapted my picking and left hand technique to better control attack & sustain, but it seemed easier to control on the Ibanez.

  6. #55

    User Info Menu

    Chris'77 -- and pianists too!

    My classical theory teacher (half the class was "crushing hard" on her) used to say "I could beat you all up with my pinky finger"

    She was a hell of a classical pianist!

  7. #56

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by KirkP View Post
    Here are a couple of screen captures from that video. The action is exceptionally high, as is especially evident from the distance they move when fretting. He doesn’t fret the 6th string at all here.


    "We've only got one tough rule in this band . And that's that cat that plays that guitar. See, everybody's got to listen to him, you know. And he ain't going to let you go nooo...where. Keeps you right straight...can't move. Keeps it together" — Count Basie
    Ok that is quite a high action.

  8. #57

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by docsteve View Post
    How did you set it up? I can‘t really get a swing rhythm sound out of mine.


    Gesendet von iPad mit Tapatalk
    Fine. I do the one note chord thing muting, works on pretty much any guitar.

  9. #58

    User Info Menu

    Oh and release the chord on the upbeat

    You don’t have to do that so much on archtop cos it decays.

  10. #59

    User Info Menu

    To me, muting the chord between beats is essential. Holding a chord does not work for me.

  11. #60

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell View Post
    To me, muting the chord between beats is essential. Holding a chord does not work for me.
    Totally agree with that!
    But you're holding the chords just as long (or short) as the Bass-Player. Ideally you get that to lock in with the Drummer aswell.

  12. #61

    User Info Menu

    Played this great Nestico chart at big band rehearsal tonight, Epiphone Sorrento, Fender Champion 50XL. Chunk.


  13. #62

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo View Post
    Played this great Nestico chart at big band rehearsal tonight, Epiphone Sorrento, Fender Champion 50XL. Chunk.

    I loved playing that chart with one of the big bands that had it in its book. I don't think Nestico ever wrote even a mediocre chart. Genius.
    Listening to it on a record can never capture the excitement and joy of playing it with a big band live.

  14. #63

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    I play with one drummer who uses period equipment and it just works.
    Sounds like 'historically informed' jazz 'performance'

  15. #64

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonah View Post
    Sounds like 'historically informed' jazz 'performance'
    Indeed

  16. #65

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim View Post
    I loved playing that chart with one of the big bands that had it in its book. I don't think Nestico ever wrote even a mediocre chart. Genius.
    Listening to it on a record can never capture the excitement and joy of playing it with a big band live.
    One of my favourites too

  17. #66

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo View Post
    Played this great Nestico chart at big band rehearsal tonight, Epiphone Sorrento, Fender Champion 50XL. Chunk.
    That’s one I used to like playing too. There’s not much going on, but it just feels good. I wish every big band pianist could leave as much open space as Basie.

  18. #67

    User Info Menu

    I played in a large big band in the early 2000s. I used my Hollenbeck with a Raezor's Edge twin 8 and AI Claris and generally I could get a setting that worked but some rooms where not good. The problem was I needed space to tinker around with where I sat and the amp and it never was enough, they did not care if the guitar got dinged by some horn player. It is all about setting up and sound check and it never goes well at a gig it seems like to me everyone is looking at me impatiently while I get things situated.

    That said I could raise the action on my 18 inch Hollenbeck and it will produce enough punch for the rhythme section to hear me, and in a big band that may really be enough. If you mic the guitar like the horns it would be fine. The Hollenbeck produces lots of punch at 6/64 and 5/64's compared to my normal setting of 5/64 and 4/64's. Looking at the Freddie Green Action I could shake the windows but it would probably have me sweating. Probably would need to take some steroids to beef up if I had to have Freddie's action.
    specializing in repair and setup, does your guitar play like it should?

  19. #68

    User Info Menu

    As for any style of music, the acoustics make a huge difference. Outdoors sucks out the bass and low mids. Too much concrete, glass and other hard surfaces turn everything to mud. My favorite space for big band was an old church with wood everywhere. Cafeterias with wood or carpeted floors and suspended acoustical tile ceilings were acceptable. The room shape and stage placement are critical too. Right angles and symmetry are generally bad. I quit two bands after they moved to rehearsal spaces with poor acoustics. If it’s impossible to sound good, why bother?

  20. #69

    User Info Menu

    I've done it with my noncut L7, and I can hear myself fine. The leader can't, though, so I bring the bud and a clip on mike to add just enough volume to keep people happy.

  21. #70

    User Info Menu

    The great George Duvivier resisted the electric bass, and even using an amp as long as he could.
    I just finished the Geo. Duvivier bio," Bassically Speaking", and Derek Smith relates the story of Duvvivier's last gig with Benny Goodman. They were playing with the Quartet in Atlantic City, and Duvivier was using an amplifier. BG told him,"Pops, could you just turn it down a bit".
    It was at the lowest level possible, but George went through the motions of turning it down. Benny wasn't satisfied, and said again, "Pops, turn it down".
    So George turned it off, and Benny immediately asked him to turn it down again.
    Without another word, George packed up the bass and amp, and left. Duvivier called BG's secretary on the way back to NY, and told her to cancel any remaining dates he had with Benny, and told her to tell Benny if he ever called him for a gig, he was "busy for life". LOL!!!!!!!

    He got so sick of his Fender bass, that he purposely left it in his car in front of his apt. in NYC, and left the doors unlocked.
    In the morning, just as he expected, the Fender was gone. He was overjoyed!

  22. #71

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim View Post
    The great George Duvivier resisted the electric bass, and even using an amp as long as he could.
    I just finished the Geo. Duvivier bio," Bassically Speaking", and Derek Smith relates the story of Duvvivier's last gig with Benny Goodman. They were playing with the Quartet in Atlantic City, and Duvivier was using an amplifier. BG told him,"Pops, could you just turn it down a bit".
    It was at the lowest level possible, but George went through the motions of turning it down. Benny wasn't satisfied, and said again, "Pops, turn it down".
    So George turned it off, and Benny immediately asked him to turn it down again.
    Without another word, George packed up the bass and amp, and left. Duvivier called BG's secretary on the way back to NY, and told her to cancel any remaining dates he had with Benny, and told her to tell Benny if he ever called him for a gig, he was "busy for life". LOL!!!!!!!

    He got so sick of his Fender bass, that he purposely left it in his car in front of his apt. in NYC, and left the doors unlocked.
    In the morning, just as he expected, the Fender was gone. He was overjoyed!
    I was expecting the story to go, he found two fender basses in the car.

  23. #72

    User Info Menu

    I think this article has most of the salient points relevant to this discussion:
    The realities of playing Acoustic Swing Rhythm Guitar — Jonathan Stout and his Campus Five featuring Hilary Alexander

    I think the TL;DR version of the article is that unless you're playing an very acoustically satisfying space, with a sensitive band re: dynamics, and period instruments (i.e. large old drums, calf-esque heads, small and thin cymbals, etc., oh, and a gut stringed acoustic bass player with no amp), then it's not a fair fight, and you should amplify as needed... but wisely. The goal is to preserve as much of the acoustic archtop timbre as possible.

    I'm kinda done with this "children should seen and not heard" nonsense applied to rhythm guitar.
    I mean, it shouldn't be loud, or anything, but it's not supposed to be inaudible.
    If you listen to air-checks where you can hear the guitar better than average, I think you'll find it actually sounds better to hear a bit of the chunk. Here's one of my favorites, Allan Reuss with Benny Goodman, live in 1937:

    He's definitely audible during the main ensembles, and he's not completely erased during the shout.
    Here's another where I feel like Reuss being audible sounds better than if he were "felt and not heard".
    (also, dig the Reuss chord solo in the 2nd chorus, and then how Nick Fatool kicks things up to start the third chorus, and how Allan's pumping along right with him in the third chorus.)
    Lastly, you can really hear that it's four even beats NOT "choo-chit" (long - SHORT).

    I'd really like to correct something above about the Freddie Green amplifier story.
    The story isn't about Freddie playing rhythm amplified, it's about him trying to take solos amplified.
    When he went to take a solo, the rhythm would drop out and the feel of the band would come undone.
    So, the fellas in the band started taking parts out of the amp so it wouldn't work, that way Freddie had no choice but to always be playing rhythm.
    Jonathan Stout
    www.campusfive.com/swingguitarblog
    My new solo acoustic archtop CD, "Pick It and Play" is available NOW!
    Preview and pre-sales at jonathanstout.bandcamp.com

  24. #73

    User Info Menu

    Yeah I was listening to fletcher Henderson the other day and the guitar is often louder than the drums (!)

  25. #74

    User Info Menu

    For early recordings, it depends a lot on where the microphone was. And there was usually only one.

  26. #75

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by campusfive View Post
    [...]
    I'm kinda done with this "children should seen and not heard" nonsense applied to rhythm guitar.
    I mean, it shouldn't be loud, or anything, but it's not supposed to be inaudible.
    I couldn't agree more. I used to play in a Band where the Bandleader threw that exact same quote at me, even though I was playin' unamplified.

    I made a record of a gig last weekend.

    (some Glenn Miller for you guys)

    I did have a clip on mic on my guitar, but I had the recorder placed behind the PA, so what you're hearing is just the acoustics coming from the stage. Bassplayer in that Band plays amplified, Drummer plays a modern Drumkit. Still I think my guitar can be heard loud enough by itself. I just want to point out, that it can be done like that, even when you're playing with modern instruments, and there's no reason to not at least try it.
    I found it extremely fruitful for my understanding of that style of music to have been in that "Fight for Volume" by the way. Even when I have my guitar mic'ed, that's the attitude I go for!

    Paul
    Last edited by Webby; 07-30-2019 at 04:01 AM.

  27. #76

    User Info Menu

    Yes, the guitar can be heard very well there. It would be interesting to hear a recording from the audience. As to "seen but not heard", when you're the leader of the band you can play as loud as you want. When you're not, you have to compromise. I've never been a bandleader, and never will be. I just enjoy playing.

  28. #77

    User Info Menu

    When you're the leader you can be Brian Setzer and make the big band accompany you, not the other way around. That's actually is exciting as it gets for me, as far as the guitar in big band is concerned.

    The traditiinal approach is fascinating, but I feel that worrying about getting things exactly right like its 1930's could be too frustrating. Maybe Im wrong.

  29. #78

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Hep To The Jive View Post
    When you're the leader you can be Brian Setzer and make the big band accompany you, not the other way around. That's actually is exciting as it gets for me, as far as the guitar in big band is concerned.

    The traditiinal approach is fascinating, but I feel that worrying about getting things exactly right like its 1930's could be too frustrating. Maybe Im wrong.
    You are not wrong.

    Play what you need to play, Amplify what you need to amplify, Good music is good music no matter how it is done. I think it was Duke Ellington that said "If it sounds good it is good".

  30. #79

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by BBGuitar View Post
    You are not wrong.

    Play what you need to play, Amplify what you need to amplify, Good music is good music no matter how it is done. I think it was Duke Ellington that said "If it sounds good it is good".
    My life turned out that way that the most experience playing guitar in big band I have is one semester in college. I also only had two guitars at the time- SG and a strat. What do I bring to the big band class, hmm... It was more modern type big band anyway, no one cared.

  31. #80

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Hep To The Jive View Post
    When you're the leader you can be Brian Setzer and make the big band accompany you, not the other way around. That's actually is exciting as it gets for me, as far as the guitar in big band is concerned.

    The traditiinal approach is fascinating, but I feel that worrying about getting things exactly right like its 1930's could be too frustrating. Maybe Im wrong.
    I think you have live and breathe this stuff to be bothered with it really.

    Ultimately I’m more interested in the present day.

  32. #81

    User Info Menu

    I don't know how this went from a suggestion that "felt and not heard" for big band rhythm guitar is a myth to bringing up someone like Brian Setzer playing rockabilly guitar all over a big band. Huh?

    And even though I think this might devolve discussion, "Good music is good music no matter how it is done."?
    No. Good music is good music precisely because of how it's done.

    I think the bigger problem with big band rhythm guitar is that it's rhythmic function, historically, is actually at cross purposes with the dominant rhythmic emphasis in a modern (i.e. post 1945) rhythm section. The thumpy, even chunk-chunk-chunk-chunk with NO backbeat seems to fight the normal legato style of walking (often a little behind, with some 8th notes thrown in), and a drummer playing ride cymbal, chicking hi hat on 2+4, with an inaudible bass drum pulse, if there is one at all.

    Duke dropped rhythm guitar in the late 40's when Fred Guy left, and hell, even Basie tried dropping guitar for a hot minute. If you don't know the story, Basie had disbanded his Orchestra in the early 50's, but started a 3 horn band sextet with no guitar - i.e. no Freddie Green. A week later, Basie arrived to the gig and Freddie Green was there unpacking his guitar. Basie said something like, "oh, are you on this gig, Pep?" (a nickname owing to his "salt and pepper" hair). Freddie just said something like, "well you workin' ain't you?". Although there were still diehards like Freddie, the rhythm of jazz evolved away from the rhythm that swing rhythm guitar provides.

    Acoustic 4-beat rhythm guitar in a modern big band is like the appendix in the human body. No one is precisely sure what purpose it serves, and you never really know that it's there until something goes horribly wrong, and then it can ruin everything.
    Jonathan Stout
    www.campusfive.com/swingguitarblog
    My new solo acoustic archtop CD, "Pick It and Play" is available NOW!
    Preview and pre-sales at jonathanstout.bandcamp.com

  33. #82

    User Info Menu

    If it sounds good, it is good

  34. #83

    User Info Menu

    I had a rehearsal last night, trying out more of the suggestions here. When the music allowed (What a Wonderful world, A Kiss to Build a Dream On), I dialed back the volume on my guitar so it was close to half acoustic, half amp. I had the amp on my left sitting on a chair, tried to keep the guitar away from my body, pointed up at a 45. Other tunes called for more volume, like a blues with guitar fills & solo.
    As I mentioned originally, we're not a big group- 8 pieces last night, no piano. Even still, we're not trying to do the period swing thing, so there's both room and the need for me to play well-amplified. A friend in the trumpet section, who also plays guitar, told me it sounds great, that I'm really filling things out. I guess the lesson is I have to go with what works, since I'm not in the Basie band!

  35. #84

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by JGinNJ View Post
    As I mentioned originally, we're not a big group- 8 pieces last night, no piano.
    My last big band had an excellent pianist, but I appreciated the rare occasions when he couldn’t make it to rehearsal. The guitarist can play so much more freely without another chordal instrument. Occasionally he’d switch to organ, which was nice too since it’s not percussive.

  36. #85

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by campusfive View Post
    I don't know how this went from a suggestion that "felt and not heard" for big band rhythm guitar is a myth to bringing up someone like Brian Setzer playing rockabilly guitar all over a big band. Huh?

    And even though I think this might devolve discussion, "Good music is good music no matter how it is done."?
    No. Good music is good music precisely because of how it's done.

    I think the bigger problem with big band rhythm guitar is that it's rhythmic function, historically, is actually at cross purposes with the dominant rhythmic emphasis in a modern (i.e. post 1945) rhythm section. The thumpy, even chunk-chunk-chunk-chunk with NO backbeat seems to fight the normal legato style of walking (often a little behind, with some 8th notes thrown in), and a drummer playing ride cymbal, chicking hi hat on 2+4, with an inaudible bass drum pulse, if there is one at all.
    This is without question the biggest problem I have come across. You really need to know drummers and bass players who are up for digging into the historical styles. (Although I would question the assertion that good modern jazz bass players play behind the beat..... But I know what you mean.)

    If that's your MISSION, your raison d'etre, then you are willing to do whatever is necessary to get the sound, find the players and book the gigs, train up the players were necessary.

    However, I've come across so many band leaders, usually horn players, even some well known leaders of swing dance bands that actually like the more modern style ride cymbal led drumming often with a backbeat ('50s Dixieland style.)

    This is frustrating from the point of view of trying to get it right, but in the end I have decided that what I do no want to do is go down the path of leading my own band in this area. I don't dance for instance, and I think you really have to.

    I still play swing and gypsy style guitar, but my approach to it is highly post modern (and working in small groups). I think that's where the fun is to be had for me. I'm lucky to work with a highly creative and attentive drummer who may not play in period style but is interested in finding ways of making it work with a rhythm guitar.

    I have a lot of respect for people who do it properly though such as yourself. The main bands in London for that are Echoes of Ellington and Back to Basie - which are run by the same band leader who insists on period accurate performance that's completely acoustic. And if anyone calls me to play acoustic rhythm in a period style band I'll be there with bells on.

    Duke dropped rhythm guitar in the late 40's when Fred Guy left, and hell, even Basie tried dropping guitar for a hot minute. If you don't know the story, Basie had disbanded his Orchestra in the early 50's, but started a 3 horn band sextet with no guitar - i.e. no Freddie Green. A week later, Basie arrived to the gig and Freddie Green was there unpacking his guitar. Basie said something like, "oh, are you on this gig, Pep?" (a nickname owing to his "salt and pepper" hair). Freddie just said something like, "well you workin' ain't you?". Although there were still diehards like Freddie, the rhythm of jazz evolved away from the rhythm that swing rhythm guitar provides.

    Acoustic 4-beat rhythm guitar in a modern big band is like the appendix in the human body. No one is precisely sure what purpose it serves, and you never really know that it's there until something goes horribly wrong, and then it can ruin everything.
    Haha, yeah.

    That said, I play regularly in a modern big band. I play a 175 into an amp, and everyone's happy lol. I just like to hear the horns.

  37. #86

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by campusfive View Post
    I don't know how this went from a suggestion that "felt and not heard" for big band rhythm guitar is a myth to bringing up someone like Brian Setzer playing rockabilly guitar all over a big band. Huh?

    And even though I think this might devolve discussion, "Good music is good music no matter how it is done."?
    No. Good music is good music precisely because of how it's done.
    That would be me responding to ''when you the leader of big band you can play as loud as you want''. Guilty, I'm a Brian Setzer fan, he made big band cool again for a while, at least for me back in the day.

    I agree with all your points on rhythm guitar in big band, you're obviously know what you talking about, and I watched your videos on the subject, fascinating stuff, and very educational! And I'm a big fan of your solo guitar, chord melody and all that stuff.

    "Good music is good music no matter how it is done" is debatable. I always think what's good for one could be awful for another person. So Brian Setzer playing rockabilly over big band sounds exciting and fresh to me, but I can see how it could be considered in a bad taste for a true big band devotee.

    Funny, I remember, there is guitarist, a big band leader in NYC, basically the East Coast answer to Jonathan Stout, who posted on FB recently something like 'only exact recreation of big band sound of that era is artistic achievement. If you deviate and start doing something of your own is not acceptable for a true artist.' I think most in jazz community were kind of shocked by that statement. But the guy can play, so it's a valid opinion I guess.

  38. #87

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by KirkP View Post
    Here are a couple of screen captures from that video. The action is exceptionally high, as is especially evident from the distance they move when fretting. He doesn’t fret the 6th string at all here.


    "We've only got one tough rule in this band . And that's that cat that plays that guitar. See, everybody's got to listen to him, you know. And he ain't going to let you go nooo...where. Keeps you right straight...can't move. Keeps it together" — Count Basie
    And yet, Steve Little, a great drummer I've worked with, who has played drums for both the Basie Band, and the Ellington Band, said that Freddie Green had bad time.
    He also said the Ellington Band couldn't sight read to save their lives. Put a new piece of music in front of them, and they sounded like a high school stage band.

  39. #88

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim View Post
    And yet, Steve Little, a great drummer I've worked with, who has played drums for both the Basie Band, and the Ellington Band, said that Freddie Green had bad time.
    He also said the Ellington Band couldn't sight read to save their lives. Put a new piece of music in front of them, and they sounded like a high school stage band.
    It’s sometimes hard to know with vets like that if they are dishing the dirt or being accurate, but I’ve heard many interesting stories over the years.

    I think the second point is worth bearing in mind as it’s hard to conceptualise today but those bands didn’t read music on the gig - a big band today is a bunch of players getting together to sight read charts.

    In fact AFAIK a lot of the early Basie arrangements - Jumpin at the Woodside etc - weren’t written down.

    When you are playing 6 shows a week or more, it’s a totally different thing.... those bands were working so much in their heyday!

  40. #89

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Hep To The Jive View Post
    Funny, I remember, there is guitarist, a big band leader in NYC, basically the East Coast answer to Jonathan Stout, who posted on FB recently something like 'only exact recreation of big band sound of that era is artistic achievement. If you deviate and start doing something of your own is not acceptable for a true artist.' I think most in jazz community were kind of shocked by that statement. But the guy can play, so it's a valid opinion I guess.
    I would agree with that it if it’s framed in terms of ‘if you are going to play swing era big band music it should be recreated as accurately as possible’ - I think that’s important because it’s such a specific sound and it’s something else when you hear it done right.

    So many musicians go onto autopilot and don’t bother to make the effort.

    Whether or not it’s art (let alone the only acceptable true art) I don’t know. I think it’s a very modern, post-millennial thing to want to do. Somewhat at odds to the jazz tradition, ironically in that I think many of the elders find this sort of thing quite strange as they abandoned those performance practices in their lifetimes. (Although as the swing era passes out of living memory, the relationship to it becomes different, more historical.)

    As Jonah puts it HIP (Period performance) for jazzers. Interesting though.
    Last edited by christianm77; 07-31-2019 at 07:46 AM.

  41. #90

    User Info Menu

    Johnny Gimble could swing better than most would say, "If you try to play like someone else who's going to play like you."

  42. #91

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    I would agree with that it if it’s framed in terms of ‘if you are going to play swing era big band music it should be recreated as accurately as possible’ - I think that’s important because it’s such a specific sound and it’s something else when you hear it done right.

    So many musicians go onto autopilot and don’t bother to make the effort.

    Whether or not it’s art (let alone the only acceptable true art) I don’t know. I think it’s a very modern, post-millennial thing to want to do. Somewhat at odds to the jazz tradition, ironically in that I think many of the elders find this sort of thing quite strange as they abandoned those performance practices in their lifetimes. (Although as the swing era passes out of living memory, the relationship to it becomes different, more historical.)

    As Jonah puts it HIP (Period performance) for jazzers. Interesting though.
    Of course, I would agree with that too, but it was not like that. It was if you're trying to do your own thing you're not an artist. You're only artist if you do what has been done. I mean it wasn't a humble post, and unprovoked, because he's well established guy. Doesn't go grocery shopping without his vintage clothes on, but I dig that, I like style conscious peeps haha.

    Close to the topic, if I play swing rhythm on my tele I found the way to make it sound better is to strum over the neck area, beyond the neck pickup. Is it a well known thing? It does make a difference than if you strum closer to bridge. More acoustic sound that way. And turned down the volume of course!

  43. #92

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Hep To The Jive View Post
    Of course, I would agree with that too, but it was not like that. It was if you're trying to do your own thing you're not an artist. You're only artist if you do what has been done. I mean it wasn't a humble post, and unprovoked, because he's well established guy. Doesn't go grocery shopping without his vintage clothes on, but I dig that, I like style conscious peeps haha.
    Yeah I know his type I play with them sometimes haha. What a load of bollocks lol.

    This is what happens when people don’t have direct contact with cantankerous mentors who slap them upside the head tell them not to be so stupid.

    Close to the topic, if I play swing rhythm on my tele I found the way to make it sound better is to strum over the neck area, beyond the neck pickup. Is it a well known thing? It does make a difference than if you strum closer to bridge. More acoustic sound that way. And turned down the volume of course!
    Yeah me too.

    Most of the archtop guys rhythm guys played in that region. Probably why they put the pickup around there.

  44. #93

    User Info Menu

    Johnny Cash used to play way up the neck. Strumming near the center of the string gives more fundamental and fewer overtones, so a different sound than near the bridge.

  45. #94
    Not a big band, but i was listening to this album, Herb Ellis and Freddie Green on rhythm guitar, besides the chill music, a great chance to hear Freddie's comping style on a whole small band album! Plus a ton of other good music on that channel..


  46. #95

    User Info Menu

    Rhythm Willie is a great album.