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  1. #1

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    Do you use drop 2&3, drop 3&4, drop 2&4, drop 4 or drop 2&3&4 voicings?
    I only explored drop 2&4 and drop 3&4 voicings as I went through Alan Kingstone's book but I find them awkward to hybrid pick. So I don't really worry about them. Did you find a way to integrate them into your comping?

    Here is a theoretical review of these voicings (at the bottom of the page):
    Drop Voicings
    Last edited by Tal_175; 03-20-2019 at 07:39 AM.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Depends on which inversions I'm using.

  4. #3

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    drop 2 and 4 are really useful, I don't touch the other ones. obviously drop 3 and drop 2 are the meat and potatoes
    White belt
    My Youtube

  5. #4

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    oh, also I only use those for solo guitar...don't bother for comping
    White belt
    My Youtube

  6. #5
    I actually find that the most fundamental voicing is drop 2. Once one memorized and knows their drop 2's, all other drop voicings can be derived easily by holding a drop 2 grip and moving one voice an octave or two. Like drop 2 on the strings 1,2,3,4, turns into a different drop 3 inversion if the note on string 1 moved to string 6 on the same fret (high e to low e) ie two octaves. Drop 2 becomes drop 2&4 when an inner voice moved by an octave diagonally etc. Octaves of these voices often fall into the same area of the fretboard.

  7. #6

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    I mostly use the drop pick voicing.

    John

  8. #7

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    I've recently been learning more drop voicings for intro/outro/solo/duo/and chord melody applications (not so much for comping). The Roni Ben-Hur video got me looking at these more closely.

  9. #8

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    The theoretical review of voicing is fine for piano, but on the guitar much needs to be clarified, for there is much confusion...

    Drop 0
    On the guitar this is called chord melody; comping from the melody line down (melody line is the top of whatever inversion of the chord put it there).

    Drop 1
    On the guitar this is just called comping, once removed under the melody line (like above, but the melody line is omitted).

    Drop 2
    This comping is twice removed (additional inversion under with a gap under the played melody line); this is really meant for pianists so their two highest right hand fingers are free to play the melody line over their chords.

    Drop 3
    This comping is thrice removed (additional inversion under with double gap under played melody line) same as above, but for fancy pianists who need three free fingers to manage more complex lines (what we guitarists would call double stops, enclosures, side slipping, etc.).

    Drop 4
    On the guitar this is really just laying out for any chords that are triads and seventh chords because the chord is fully dropped with no chord tones left, may also be laying out for some three and four note voicing of extended chords, too, depending on how you interpret them.

    Drop 234
    On the guitar this is called single note soloing (but technically includes playing Wes style octaves too, since that's just doubling the lone melody line).
    Last edited by pauln; 03-21-2019 at 09:15 AM.
    "Bent my ear to hear the tune and closed my eyes to see."

  10. #9

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    Getting an early start on April Fool's Day?

    Quote Originally Posted by pauln View Post
    The theoretical review of voicing is fine for piano, but on the guitar much needs to be clarified, for there is much confusion...

    Drop 0
    On the guitar this is called chord melody; comping from the melody line down (melody line is the top of whatever inversion of the chord put it there).

    Drop 1
    On the guitar this is just called comping, once removed under the melody line (like above, but the melody line is omitted).

    Drop 2
    This comping is twice removed (additional inversion under with a gap under the played melody line); this is really meant for pianists so their two highest right hand fingers are free to play the melody line over their chords.

    Drop 3
    This comping is thrice removed (additional inversion under with double gap under played melody line) same as above, but for fancy pianists who need three free fingers to manage more complex lines (what we guitarists would call double stops, enclosures, side slipping, etc.).

    Drop 4
    On the guitar this is really just laying out for any chords that are triads and seventh chords because the chord is fully dropped with no chord tones left, may also be laying out for some three and four note voicing of extended chords, too, depending on how you interpret them.

    Drop 234
    On the guitar this is called single note soloing (but technically includes playing Wes style octaves too, since that's just doubling the lone melody line).

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by pauln View Post
    The theoretical review of voicing is fine for piano, but on the guitar much needs to be clarified, for there is much confusion...

    Drop 0
    On the guitar this is called chord melody; comping from the melody line down (melody line is the top of whatever inversion of the chord put it there).

    Drop 1
    On the guitar this is just called comping, once removed under the melody line (like above, but the melody line is omitted).

    Drop 2
    This comping is twice removed (additional inversion under with a gap under the played melody line); this is really meant for pianists so their two highest right hand fingers are free to play the melody line over their chords.

    Drop 3
    This comping is thrice removed (additional inversion under with double gap under played melody line) same as above, but for fancy pianists who need three free fingers to manage more complex lines (what we guitarists would call double stops, enclosures, side slipping, etc.).

    Drop 4
    On the guitar this is really just laying out for any chords that are triads and seventh chords because the chord is fully dropped with no chord tones left, may also be laying out for some three and four note voicing of extended chords, too, depending on how you interpret them.

    Drop 234
    On the guitar this is called single note soloing (but technically includes playing Wes style octaves too, since that's just doubling the lone melody line).
    don't confuse the poor kids out there!
    White belt
    My Youtube