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  1. #1

    Nick Lucas Chord, Rhythm and Fill-in Book for Guitar

    I did work with Nick Lucas Guitar Method Books Vol 1 and 1. However I
    never had his book Nick Lucas Chord, Rhythm and Fill-in Book for Guitar.I am wondering if anyone on this forum who worked with this book could provide more details about content.
    Attached Images Attached Images Nick Lucas Chord, Rhythm and Fill-in Book for Guitar-bmg-october-1934-jpg Nick Lucas Chord, Rhythm and Fill-in Book for Guitar-nick-lucas-chord-rhythm-fill-book-guitar_front-png 

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2
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    I think I have it, but I have no time today. Hopefully I'll be able to respond tomorrow, if no one else has.

  4. #3
    That's great. Thanks Rob

  5. #4
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    Home now.

    It's very basic, and for me was quite disappointing.

    Contents:

    Nick Lucas Chord, Rhythm and Fill-in Book for Guitar-lucas-contents-jpg

    Random page:

    Nick Lucas Chord, Rhythm and Fill-in Book for Guitar-lucas-e-major-jpg

    Song:

    Nick Lucas Chord, Rhythm and Fill-in Book for Guitar-lucas-song-jpg

    and Fill-ins:

    Nick Lucas Chord, Rhythm and Fill-in Book for Guitar-lucas-fill-jpg

  6. #5
    Thanks for your review Rob.

  7. #6
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    Notice the picking directions, consistent with rest stroke picking.

  8. #7
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    Indeed.

    I like the Schumann quotation at the end.

  9. #8
    I see it covers ‘How to play jazz’ in just one page, must be a great book.

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  11. #10
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    What does he say about altered chords?

  12. #11
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    Not a lot, but for those who haven't played them before, it's a start:

    Nick Lucas Chord, Rhythm and Fill-in Book for Guitar-lucas-altered-jpg

    And here's his one-page guide in how to play jazz:

    Nick Lucas Chord, Rhythm and Fill-in Book for Guitar-lucas-jazz-jpg


    I've now scanned the whole book - some 55MB. Hopefully anyone interested can download the pdf here:

    Dropbox - The Nick Lucas Chord, Rhythm and Fill-In Book.pdf

  13. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    Not a lot, but for those who haven't played them before, it's a start:

    Nick Lucas Chord, Rhythm and Fill-in Book for Guitar-lucas-altered-jpg

    And here's his one-page guide in how to play jazz:

    Nick Lucas Chord, Rhythm and Fill-in Book for Guitar-lucas-jazz-jpg


    I've now scanned the whole book - some 55MB. Hopefully anyone interested can download the pdf here:

    Dropbox - The Nick Lucas Chord, Rhythm and Fill-In Book.pdf
    Thanks that’s REALLY interesting to me. In this book altered basically seems to mean b5/#11

  14. #13
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    I’m also going to use that definition of jazz because it’s hilarious.

  15. #14
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    How's your fox trotting these days, Christian?

  16. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    I’m also going to use that definition of jazz because it’s hilarious.
    yes I can't believe people spend hours arguing about CST etc. and paying for lessons when it's all that simple.

  17. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    I’m also going to use that definition of jazz because it’s hilarious.
    But it's a pretty good representation of Eddie Lang's "hot" accompaniment. Incidentally, there is a vignette of Lang and Venuti playing as part of the Whiteman orchestra in the otherwise dreadful film, The King of Jazz.

  18. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    How's your fox trotting these days, Christian?


    Don't ask the Brits about foxes.

  19. #18
    I totally want to learn "Naughty Joe," but I'm not sure I want to spend the time on it...
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  20. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    I totally want to learn "Naughty Joe," but I'm not sure I want to spend the time on it...

    You'll kick yourself if you get a request next gig.

  21. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by A. Kingstone View Post
    You'll kick yourself if you get a request next gig.
    You coming to my next gig? Cool.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  22. #21
    You're a beautiful player, I'd be delighted.

  23. #22
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    Joking aside, that history of jazz/dance connection does interest me, all these records put out as foxtrots:



    So, now we have the swing dance revival and all the young cats are Lindyhop and therefore "4/4 140-180bpm or I WILL NOT UNDERSTAND IT..." Woe betide you if you play a waltz let alone a latin tune... Also young dudes will not cut time (i.e. dance to a record at 240 as if it were at 120) like the original swing dancers did when something like Tickle Toe came on.

    Well maybe a bit of Balboa from time to time, then you can edge into the medium up swing area...

    I was surprised when I played a swing dance event attended by a few older dancers and they requested a couple of waltzes. I guess those guys are coming from being able to dance generally and probably do ballroom* as well.

    Whereas mainstream society was dancing these more ballroom dances like Foxtrot and Quickstep, and Benny had cross over appeal. So I suppose you dance this stuff with your parents before heading down the Savoy to dance Lindy with the cool kids. (In 1937 or whatever)

    But in Nick Lucas's time jazz did have a very specific meaning. Nowadays we'd think of swing music and bebop as jazz (Bird did not regard his music as jazz), but in the 30's and 40's jazz meant 1920s New Orleans/Chicago music. Dance bands might play jazz but they'd also play sweet music and so on.

    None of which would be news to the knowledgable and dedicated likes of Rob I'm sure but I do find that stuff interesting, because the idea of what jazz is has changed so much.

    I still occasionally read things where a Clifford Brown side or something is described as a 'quickstep' - I doubt anyone danced ballroom quickstep to it, but the term is probably a holdover from earlier uptempo jazz like Louis' Dinah...

    *of course no one enjoys playing ballroom gigs because they really are metronome Nazis.

  24. #23
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    Hello All,
    Since someone commented on the One Page Explanation of Jazz it's might be worth noting that the word "Jazz" had a different meaning during the first two decades of the 20th Century. "Jazzing a tune" in the 1920s meant playing popular songs and recasting the melodies with syncopation and adding fills to the ends of phrases. It wasn't a particularly involved process then.

    This gave way over time to playing variations on the melody and by the 1930s to a style that referenced both the melody and the chord changes. Louis Armstrong and Lester Young always respected the primacy of the song.

    Regards,
    Jerome

  25. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by monk View Post
    Hello All,
    Since someone commented on the One Page Explanation of Jazz it's might be worth noting that the word "Jazz" had a different meaning during the first two decades of the 20th Century. "Jazzing a tune" in the 1920s meant playing popular songs and recasting the melodies with syncopation and adding fills to the ends of phrases. It wasn't a particularly involved process then.

    This gave way over time to playing variations on the melody and by the 1930s to a style that referenced both the melody and the chord changes. Louis Armstrong and Lester Young always respected the primacy of the song.

    Regards,
    Jerome
    Great to hear from you, Jerome.

  26. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    Great to hear from you, Jerome.
    Thanks, Matt.

    While I'm on the subject it might be appropriate to mention something that was called "Ragging the classics" whereby ragtime pianists took well-known themes from the Classical and Romantic periods and syncopated them in ragtime style. Some pop composers in the late 1890s through the Teens actually composed songs based on these practices. George L. Cobb wrote Russian Rag, based on Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C#minor.
    Jelly Roll Morton (a Paragon of veracity!) said in interviews that the practice of ragging the classics as well as popular tunes of the day is what led to the nascent style that evolved into jazz.

    Russian Rag:


    Enjoy,
    Jerome
    Last edited by monk; 03-09-2019 at 01:49 PM.

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