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  1. #1

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    I currently have a Strat partscaster with a 7.5" radius neck. Even though I have fairly small hands, I find it rather crowded to comp even with 3-4 fingers.

    Would I have more space on say a 10" or 12" radius neck? Thanks.

    Doug

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Space would be about string spacing and neck width. Usually the width at the heel is fixed, but the neck at the nut can usually be anywhere from 1-5/8" to 1-3/4". Also the spacing of the string slots in the nut will affect the string spacing. A flatter board can help with single not playing and chording, but you have to like that radius if you are going to barre chord. I do a lot of barre chording even while muting strings and I like the 7.25" and 9.5" radiused necks best.

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by lammie200
    Space would be about string spacing and neck width. Usually the width at the heel is fixed, but the neck at the nut can usually be anywhere from 1-5/8" to 1-3/4". Also the spacing of the string slots in the nut will affect the string spacing. A flatter board can help with single not playing and chording, but you have to like that radius if you are going to barre chord. I do a lot of barre chording even while muting strings and I like the 7.25" and 9.5" radiused necks best.
    Thanks, that gives me something to work with. I like my present neck, but I think I'll look on Warmoth to see if they have any wider necks.

    Doug

  5. #4

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    Sure. You might want to check out their In Stock shop. Things there are slightly less expensive than starting from scratch. Also much faster to get.

  6. #5

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    If you've got a music store handy, you could go play a bunch of guitars and see what you like. I like fairly flat (12" radius) fairly wide (1 11/16 to 1 3/4) necks. But I'm 6'3" and my hands are proportionate.

  7. #6

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    7.5 is great for comping! I could never get along with Gibson 12'' radius playing rhythm, Fender necks are much better, no fatigue. Narrow 1 5/8 width is also great, and my hands are not too small either. I just don't get the attraction of wide and flat necks for most people, maybe I didn't learn the left hand technique proper.

  8. #7

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    Maybe I was looking at the wrong features that I found awkward. Could be that it's not the neck radius but the neck thickness? Or some other aspect of neck construction?

    Thanks for all the contributions.

    Doug

  9. #8

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    Yea, it's usually mix of neck profile, neck thicknes, nut width, radius, and even scale lenghth for some. It took me years and $$$$ to realize what are my preferences.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hep To The Jive
    Yea, it's usually mix of neck profile, neck thicknes, nut width, radius, and even scale lenghth for some. It took me years and $$$$ to realize what are my preferences.
    I was on the warmoth site and checking out the strat necks with a Gibson scale length. Hmm...

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug B
    I was on the warmoth site and checking out the strat necks with a Gibson scale length. Hmm...
    haha, I hear ya! Personally, not a factor for me, but I notice it's a bit more natural to play chord solos on my Guild (24.75 neck) than a tele, but not a big deal.

    I think shorter neck on a strat look a little funny? (yea, thats what she said lol)

  12. #11

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    I tried a 25.25" neck on my Tele partscaster once. I didn't like it. I think that there is something to be said about the original Fender designs at least in terms of necks and bodies. The first electric I bought was a Tele with mostly vintage specs. Maybe that influenced me to go back to those specs after trying a bunch of other things.

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by lammie200
    I tried a 25.25" neck on my Tele partscaster once. I didn't like it. I think that there is something to be said about the original Fender designs at least in terms of necks and bodies. The first electric I bought was a Tele with mostly vintage specs. Maybe that influenced me to go back to those specs after trying a bunch of other things.
    Could be. Maybe we think of our first guitar as being 'the right way' . Unless of course we have one of them there pointy metal guitars!

    OMG!!!

  14. #13

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    our esteemed forum member- tim lerch -just recently posted this study..of a short scale tele..very interesting



    cheers

    ps- 9.5 and 12 radius are the favored these days...7.5 vintage fender can be a bit sticky for some...classical inspired finger pickers may like even flatter boards..even 20" radius etc...its really completely subjective..but does make a huge difference...just have to dial in your preferences

  15. #14

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    Skinny, low, vintage style frets can be a problem for some folks, I prefer medium jumbo myself. It can be about more than just the radius or width of a neck.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo
    Skinny, low, vintage style frets can be a problem for some folks, I prefer medium jumbo myself.
    How so? Please explain.

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug B
    How so? Please explain.
    Fret buzz is the most common issue with lower, skinny frets.

  18. #17

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    Thanks.

  19. #18

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    the Radius will effect comping and cording as will the Nut widith thats how they neasure finger board width now a days By nut size. You also have to take into account of neck shape D, C, modern C, V. and then their is the problem of neck thickness. Today many necks are made with different Thickness, a strat type guitar made in different countries, are different thickness than another country. And then there is a compound Radius Neck. A wider Nut will mean wider string spacing. A lower radius will mean less bending area, and more problems with cording because your fingers on the E,B will tend to pull them down more making them more sharp.