Jazz Guitar
+ Reply to Thread
Posts 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Lincolnshire, England
    Posts
    1,704

    What's Jonathan Kreisberg doing in his intro here?

    Someone posted a question about this on another forum, and I thought maybe the intro is basically like/related to a 3-6-2-5 in G, i.e. with subs and variations in there. But I'm on shaky ground really, and I thought why not consult the wisdom of this forum - if anyone would care to offer some analysis?



    Rather lovely sounding and unusual chord voicings I thought anyhow.

  2. # ADS
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Posts
    Many
    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2
    Don't have time, but I looked at the first 4 bars. They're a variant of the diatonic chords in G.
    I, IV, IIIm, IIm

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Lincolnshire, England
    Posts
    1,704
    Thanks for the replies 4thstuning and fuzzthebee - I will think through what you've said. I guess one follow up question I have is - is there a certain way of thinking, or theoretical viewpoint behind sounds like this? I have thought that JK may have come up with this just by exploring on the guitar, and finding sounds he likes, but perhaps there is more of a specific harmonic approach behind things?

  5. #4
    I'd disagree with a few of the choices the transcriber made as to naming the chords, but they are minor disagreements for the most part and not really that important to the analysis, except for the Ebmaj13#11 which makes much more sense as a B7alt. The Abmaj7 is probably best looked at as a chromatic mediant. One shouldn't analyze that as part of the key or even a modulation, it's just a quick one chord out of the key.

    For the most part everything there can be analyzed in G or Em. For me it makes more sense to look at it as being in the key of Em. But it's a little ambiguous because we demonstrate key primarily by harmonic cadences, and there really aren't any clear cadences until we leave the main part of the intro and land on the Em chord in bar 13. You could argue bar 8 to 9 we have a deceptive type cadence if we analyze the chord in bar 8 as a B7alt, and the chord in bar 9 as a Gmaj9/B, then that gives us a deceptive cadence (in the key of Em).

    I guess one follow up question I have is - is there a certain way of thinking, or theoretical viewpoint behind sounds like this? I have thought that JK may have come up with this just by exploring on the guitar, and finding sounds he likes, but perhaps there is more of a specific harmonic approach behind things?
    There is nothing here that is that far out or unique about it, even though it may sound like it, or look like it, especially if you analyze the chords badly like the chord labeled as an Ebmaj. It's just basic harmony 101. There is no special knowledge required for it other than basic chord theory. I do think to come up with cool stuff like this you really do need to "explore the guitar and find sounds you like", but there is nothing esoteric about this intro.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Lincolnshire, England
    Posts
    1,704
    Thanks for your thoughtful reply Guitarzen - I had noticed the ambiguous aspect myself, so what you say does make sense to me, although I find I tend towards hearing the intro as being in G major - that's just me of course. And also I do take your point re the "Ebmaj13#11".

    Also take your point re this not being an example of some kind of special advanced modern harmony or anything - I guess for me there is a "modern" sound to it though, or indeed "cool stuff" as you put it, and I was really just probing a bit to see if was anything specific behind that. But "explore and find sounds" works for me - just having an adventurous spirit and not feeling restricted is the key thing maybe.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Lincolnshire, England
    Posts
    1,704
    Cheers fuzzthebee, I did pick up on the quartal voicing aspect, and I guess you may well be right about that being behing the "modern" sound. Although just looking at the opening voicing, I have to say I'm not used to minor 7th chords with b13s on top, so for me there is a certain freshness of approach in that kind of thing also.

    I still do hear something of a 3-6-2-5 kind of sound in the intro - that's just the way my brain seems to work, and as already mentioned, there is a certain ambiguity about the intro anyhow. But I like your analysis a lot, and what you say re relating the intro to typical ending for this piece does strike me as very reasonable. I'll have to have a think through what you've said in more detail, and cheers for taking the time to listen and post your thoughts, much appreciated!

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Lincolnshire, England
    Posts
    1,704
    I thought it was pretty amazing when I heard it too, and glad it strikes you the same way fuzzthebee. I do take your point re the chord naming, and I couldn't argue that a maj9 is a more normal kind of chord than a min7b13, plus I can also persuade myself into hearing things in the I IV I IV way you describe. So I'm certainly not arguing - I think you make a very strong case, and make some excellent observations.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Lincolnshire, England
    Posts
    1,704
    Quote Originally Posted by fuzzthebee View Post
    Oh, it's all good. I meant to say I think your ear was kind of right in the first place. So I was trying to figure out how he may have arrived at those movements from the original changes.
    Cheers for that, all good - absolutely, how we hear things is how we hear things, come what may. And I suspect he found the chords intuitively, while noodling around on the guitar and exploring ideas, but it would be interesting to know what was going on in his head...

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    1,334
    My ears and soul can not get enough of Jonathan Kreisberg.
    “When you’re creating your own ...., man, even the sky ain’t the limit.”
    Miles Davis

  11. #10
    When I watch videos of Krieseberg he gets this grin sometimes like it's coming out exactly how he hears it .....
    His Solo Guitar stuff is really amazing to me.
    This one is the most ridiculously good yet I think....

  12. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Robertkoa View Post
    When I watch videos of Krieseberg he gets this grin sometimes
    Not as perpetually ecstatically orgasmically rapturously irritatingly grinny as... damn, I've forgotten his name!

    Oh, yes, Julian Lage :-)



    I don't really mean it...

    usually...

  13. #12
    Try it without the sound :-)

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    St.Petersburg, Russian Federation
    Posts
    3,006
    Quote Originally Posted by Robertkoa View Post
    When I watch videos of Krieseberg he gets this grin sometimes like it's coming out exactly how he hears it .....
    His Solo Guitar stuff is really amazing to me.
    This one is the most ridiculously good yet I think....
    It is true. Really amazing but surprisingly it leaves me absolutely indifferent...
    I think he is that type of guy who likes technical challenges to overcome and make it perfection.
    His solo recordings sound like extremely well elaborated and ourely performed arrangement.
    Like it is programmed in advance (or being programmed right now)

    though I like his work in a group quite often.. there he often sounds more loose and more.. imperfect .. human?)))
    Maybe it is because he has interaction with bandmates - and it makes his reactions more spontaneous?

Join our Facebook Page

Get in Touch


Jazz Guitar eBooks
How To Get a Jazz Guitar Tone?
Privacy Policy

 

 

 

Follow us on:

Jazz Guitar Online on FacebookJazz Guitar Online on TwitterJazz Guitar Online on YoutubeJazz Guitar Online RSS Feed