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  1. #26

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    Well done, Ed. That's one scary book - so much in it. I was wondering if, by mentioning page 31, you had done all the previous pages. Then, when I looked through the whole book (without guitar in hand) I see that on page 77 it says it is best to start the book at page 32! What a strange way to organise a book. But there is an awful lot of useful knowledge in the book. Keep at it!

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #27

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    Rob,

    I started at the beginning. The first 25 or so pages are basic music theory. The triads start on page 28. I don't think the PDF pages and the book pages match up. The approach is very old-school. Old-school works for the string instruments while guitar has thousands of methods. I'm old-school educated in the the rote memorization style of teaching/learning, so I'm right at home with this book - so far. :-)

    I'm going to stick with it and work slowly. The fingerboard is still a partial mystery to me and that has always been my brick wall.

    Ed T.
    Last edited by edspyhill01; 12-31-2013 at 06:32 PM.

  4. #28

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    Update for week 2 - triads.

    The first exercise was the three triads that shared the same note on the E-String. Example, G - C - Eb, etc.

    Yesterday I started the second exercise which is playing the 3 triads that share the same note on the B-string. This would start, G - Bb, D. Continue up the neck at each fret. I'm already in uncharted territory. Reminds me of when I was in Thailand in 1967/1968. I lived off base and my house was maybe 100 yards from a dirt road into the jungle. I saw Thais going in and out of that jungle with no idea who they were or what they lived in. I only knew the front surface, the facade of the jungle of bamboo trees. Everything else was a mystery. Just like my guitar neck.

    Still on the first string set, G-B-E strings. Next will be the three triads that share the same note on the G-String.

    Ed

  5. #29

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    good suggestions above.


    Leavitt Book Two for closed voicings. Book three for open position.

  6. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by edspyhill01
    One resource I have to mention and thank is Rich Severson. His examples on how to use triad inversions was eye opening.
    Is this a specific video? I enjoy Rich's stuff, and would like to see his take on things.

    I continue to work closed-position triads in all inversions on all string sets, ascending and descending the neck, through all keys. I do this daily. I'm a lot faster at it than I used to be, but I still sometimes falter in the heat of the moment! (I'm using a modified version of the GVE studies in Harmonic Mechanisms.) Once I am completely solid on this material, I'm going to move on to the spread triads.

    On a side note, it is very interesting to see how triads (closed-position, or spread) make up the "core" of many more familiar c4-note chord shapes (drop-2 and drop-3). Very useful for comping.

  7. #31

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    Here's a list of triads and various 3 note structures over a C bass note that form 7th chords.

    Cma7 ---------- Em/C

    C7 -------------- Edim/C

    Cma7+ -------- E/C

    C7+ ------------ Emab5/C

    Cma7b5 -------- Bsus/C

    C7b5 ------------ F#7(no 5th)/C

    CmMa7 ---------- Eb+/C

    Cm7 ------------ Eb/C

    CdimMa7 ------- B/C

    Cm7b5 --------- Ebm/C

    Cdim7 --------- Ebdim/C

    Cma7sus ------ G7(no 5th)/C

    C7sus --------- Gm7(no 5th)/C

    Cm7#5 ------- Ebsus/C

    At the 9, 11 and 13 level many other triads and 3 note structures get involved.
    Last edited by bako; 01-17-2014 at 03:28 AM. Reason: format and info missing

  8. #32

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    bako, cool. thanks for the work.

    edh

  9. #33

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    It seems like it would be difficult to understand triads when the finger board is a mystery to you.
    Decide to put in the effort to learn the fingerboard!You will be amazed at how other aspects of remembering triads and such will come to you !
    To learn the fingerboard take material from many sources and to drill the musical piece at different positions on the fingerboard.
    To be clear ....if you are studying a drill, etude theme in key of "C" please do play it in the 1st position 2nd position 5th,7th,9th. After a dozen or so more or less you will know the notes of the "C" scale all over the finger board.
    If the piece is in another key do the same.
    Unfortunately this work needs to be done if you want to be knowledgeable
    After all that and I mean all that .... If you play a scale made from triads in 3 inversions and in different keys it won't be a mystery anymore!
    Marc

  10. #34

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    I've been playing so long that triads aren't something I think about. But recently some guitarist said they learned every triad that can be managed on the fretboard.

    So beyond learning the basic major, minor, diminished triads we can just pick 3 random notes on the fretboard and later on determine what chords they are.

    How about an open E (1st string), an Eb on the B string and a D on the 3rd string? Sounds terrible I know, but it's an example of all the possibilities.

  11. #35

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    Greetings,

    Another option is Truefire's "Inversion Excursion" with Frank Vignola. It covers every chord under the sun so it's more than triads but it covers all the triads.

    http://truefire.com/jazz-guitar-less...xcursion-jazz/

  12. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by fumblefingers
    good suggestions above.


    Leavitt Book Two for closed voicings. Book three for open position.

    That's how I learned them. There are also exercises that have you walking up the fret board while playing the notes of the parent scale. Great way to begin learning how to comp in my opinion anyway.

  13. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Patriots2006
    That's how I learned them. There are also exercises that have you walking up the fret board while playing the notes of the parent scale. Great way to begin learning how to comp in my opinion anyway.
    Can someone reply with the full name of the Leavitt book(s)? Modern Method ones?

  14. #38

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    A Modern method for Guitar Volumes 1 2 and 3 by William G. Leavitt

  15. #39

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    The Advancing Guitarist by Mick Goodrick, basic four triads on page 39, triads with bass notes on page 74, IMO this is a must have book for guitarists.

  16. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop
    Lots of mentions here for the George Van Eps book. There is a new thread looking at his method, with videos for help:
    this link here is no longer?

  17. #41

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    I think the link was to this thread: George Van Eps Guitar Method