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  1. #1

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    I am looking for good examples of jazz blues comping to transcribe.

    I hope I can find some songs with just guitar and vocal or two guitars or guitar and bass so that it could be easier for me to hear the guitar as I am a beginner.

    Can you please suggest something for me?

    Thanks so much for your help and for all the great things that I find in this forum.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Check out Joe Pass & Ella Fitzgerald recordings on youtube. He has a very bluesy jazz way of comping, even when not playing something specifically jazz blues. And to my ears, he's the best at it.

  4. #3

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    I would suggest to hear a lot of Kenny Burrell and the young George Benson (especially his recordings with baritone sax player Ronnie Cuber, i.e. 'The Geroge Benson Cookbook')

  5. #4

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    Another great album for comping is Julie Is Her Name Vol 1 & 2, with Julie London, Barney Kessel on guitar (and Ray Leatherwood on bass). I forgot about this one, even though it is one of my favorites.

  6. #5

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    Check out Ed Bickert!


  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by HighSpeedSpoon
    Another great album for comping is Julie Is Her Name Vol 1 & 2, with Julie London, Barney Kessel on guitar (and Ray Leatherwood on bass). I forgot about this one, even though it is one of my favorites.
    Is that where her version of "I"m In the Mood For Love" comes from? I love her vocal on that, and Barney's playing is stellar.

  8. #7

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    Oh I forgot to mention, for the basics of jazz blues comping, Jim Ferguson's book, All Blues for Jazz Guitar: Comping Styles, Chords & Grooves, is pretty good. It has plenty of basic blues jazz comping examples for you to play through

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    Is that where her version of "I"m In the Mood For Love" comes from? I love her vocal on that, and Barney's playing is stellar.
    There is a version on that album, and it is 2:31 in length - good for radio play in 1955. I'm not aware of other versions by her but there might be.

    To be honest, I think fep's suggestion is probably more in line with what the OP is looking for, but as long as we're on the subject ... If there is any one song for which those albums are noted (Julie is Her Name, Vols 1 & 2), it is probably Cry Me a River. I will only add one more personal favorite of mine: Her rendition of Easy Street. You have probably heard the saying "People hear with their eyes." Julie London is an excellent early example of that!
    Last edited by HighSpeedSpoon; 01-27-2013 at 08:52 PM.

  10. #9

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    Blues progressions in F and Bb are usually taught first. Bb is a great key for guitarists. With the root on the 6th string and in the middle of the guitar, there are no problems with the basic chord voicings, but I always found blues in F problematic. You don't want to play the barre chord F7 - sounds too hokey - and the Bb9 doesn't work so good at the first fret. Also, F7 and F9 (root on 5th string) sound too dominant to me to serve as I chords.

    Here's some nice voicings for F a teacher showed me a while back with a simple, arpeggio based etude. The voicings are nice because except for the turnaround, the highest note on each chord is the F (2nd string, 6th fret). Has sort of a piano pedal feel where you sustain one note through a series of chords.
    Good examples of jazz blues comping?-mondens-blues-f-head-png
    Last edited by kofblz; 01-27-2013 at 09:57 PM.

  11. #10

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    Thanks everyone for all the suggestions! I checked out all of them and find them really helpful. You're awesome! That's why I love this forum - one can learn so much from people here.

    I listened to the Julie London and Barney Kessel album and I liked it a lot. I will surely try to transcribe some songs.

    kofblz, thank you for the etude. That's what I'll be practicing today

    fep, the Don Mock video is amazing. It will take me some time to work through it.
    Last edited by maya; 01-28-2013 at 02:32 PM.

  12. #11

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    @fep

    Just to double-check, did you mean Beyond Basics: Jazz Guitar Rhythm Chops DVD? The DVD has a different cover now, but if this is the correct DVD, then there is an updated companion booklet available from Don Mock here.

  13. #12

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    Any of Thelonious Monk's or Bill Evans' blues tunes will be good to analyse from a comping perspective! Pianists have amazing comping ideas I tend to find

  14. #13

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    Stevie Ray Vaughan "Tin Pan Alley"and "Honey Bee", I know he's not a "jazz" player but if you want to put some blues in your jazz a bunch of his tunes use "jazz blues" progressions and his voicings are on the money, as is his "feel"(for the blues).I must confess Stevie Ray was my original inspiration to play gutar so I am pretty much a fan. Also check out Ed Bickert he is the master.

  15. #14
    Dutchbopper Guest
    I have a few vid examples of the book by Warren Nunes "The Blues" in a Blog entry:

    Dutchbopper: Nostalgia: Warren Nunes - The Blues

    I still like that book.

    Regards,

    Dick

  16. #15

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    I did an example that might help as well. It can be tricky to transcribe chords so written examples can help until you start to hear them in other people's comping.


    Good examples of jazz blues comping?-jazz-blues-comping-png


    It's good to transcribe and you can take the ideas and use the 'chord moves' or tweak them. My example is most approach chords and chord fragments, focusing on making little melodies with the upper notes of the chord.

    I used to just play a chord or various inversions which is okay in some situations but it's nice to play melodic phrases using chords and use a lot of movement in comping.

  17. #16

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    Thanks for the link, but I believe there may be a misprint in the booklet (page 3).

    It looks like to me that the 2nd chord in 4th bar of Example 4 should be:

    7
    7
    6
    5
    X
    5

    The melody note is still the B and the chord is written correctly, an A13. May be wrong but that's what I see and hear.

    Quote Originally Posted by HighSpeedSpoon
    @fep

    Just to double-check, did you mean Beyond Basics: Jazz Guitar Rhythm Chops DVD? The DVD has a different cover now, but if this is the correct DVD, then there is an updated companion booklet available from Don Mock here.
    Last edited by kofblz; 02-05-2013 at 11:31 PM.

  18. #17

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    It might be worth checking out the Sonny Rollins album 'The Bridge' Jim Hall on guitar is the only comping instrument so that would probably have heaps of great ideas.

    Although you mentioned transcribing a great book is Andrew Greens book on comping. No tab though, but if you can read there is a lot of information there.

    Other than that, listen to and transcribe piano players like Wynton Kelly, Bill Evans, Tommy Flanagan...if you are a beginner don't worry too much about the voicings, although if you can figure them out, brilliant, but try and capture the feel and the rhythmic ideas in their playing.

    Hope this helps. All the best.

  19. #18

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    check out anything by freddie green, those 3 note chord voicings are great for navigating the fretboard and are really simple to transcribe

  20. #19

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    Hi Simon, thanks for your recommendations. I have listened to Freddie Green a bit but only with a big band and it's awfully difficult for me to distinguish the guitar chords being played. Can you recommend his recordings in a smaller setting or some where the guitar is clearly heard? Thanks a lot!

  21. #20

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    Well, I would suggest try and listne to as much as possible, but if you want some really good Freddie green chord lessons check out Matt Warnock's site

  22. #21

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    Here's a couple of turnarounds for the last 2 bars of F blues with chromatic movement on the top note. I like the descending one. After the F9 the fingers stay on the same strings - very easy and sounds nice to me. Your mileage may vary.

    Good examples of jazz blues comping?-chromatic-melodic-ascending-f-blues-png

  23. #22

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    Another thing you can do is starting in bar 7 play the F13 ascending line, one chord per measure. Then in bar 11 start the descending line with the F9, 2 chords per measure, instead of playing the F7 like above. Ascend in bars 7-10 and descend in 11 and 12. Sort of a cool thing to do a few times until you get tired of it.

  24. #23

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    Agree with the Freddie Green posts. Check out the site dedicated to the man (The Freddie Green Web Site). Here's a link to very fun and useful examples of rhythm comp styles.

    A Comparative Study of Rhythm Guitar Styles

    Any of these samples are handy, but one of my favorite samples is "G Blues in the Style of Teddy Wilson" which is an homage to Benny Goodman's pianist. Apparently, his playing inspired some cool rhythm comp style.

  25. #24

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    Thought I would post off the Top... sample of some Jazz / Blues comping... Not organized, but if something sounds interesting just ask and I'll go into details etc...

  26. #25

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    Nice playing again Reg-its a pity you dont put some of these or parts as PDF's so us slower guys can get some of the benefit.Cheers
    '

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by HighSpeedSpoon
    Another great album for comping is Julie Is Her Name Vol 1 & 2, with Julie London, Barney Kessel on guitar (and Ray Leatherwood on bass). I forgot about this one, even though it is one of my favorites.
    Actually, Kessel's only on Volume 1. Volume 2 is Howard Roberts, no slouch himself.
    Brad

  28. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzuki
    Nice playing again Reg-its a pity you dont put some of these or parts as PDF's so us slower guys can get some of the benefit.Cheers
    '
    What are those 2 chords from 1:38 - 1:41? Is that a Gm11 to a C7#5#9 ? Sounds great whatever it is.

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by kofblz
    What are those 2 chords from 1:38 - 1:41? Is that a Gm11 to a C7#5#9 ? Sounds great whatever it is.
    Yes it's just an altered II V... G- to C7b13#9. I don't so much worry about the actual spelling of chords... I think of tonal areas and lead lines. in blues usually groove melodies. Those chords would be G- dorian to C7 altered with the C to D# lead line , so sure The G- would be notes played... Bb the b3rd, D the 5th, E the 13 and C the 7th... But our ears by the time I played that voicing already have a reference...we already hear G- going to C7. With the use of C7 altered
    I open the Melodic min door... that C7alt. could also be a Gb13#11.

    That Dorian to altered application is one of my favorites.

    I'll try and make another vid...Reg

  30. #29

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    How do you come to a conclusion as to what voicings to use here? Is there a method of practice for learning and using alternates for each chord (I-IV-V ect.) that sound smooth like your playing here? Which substitutions work and which do not? I know chord variations, but the transition doesn't sound as fluid. Any tips or recommendations to some references/books.

    I guess simply put, I don't want to stay on one chord the entire time. I'd like to spice things up like you have here. I don't want transcriptions necessarily. I don't want the answer, I want to be able to know and show the work if that makes sense.

    Thanks in advance.

  31. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Reg
    Yes it's just an altered II V... G- to C7b13#9. I don't so much worry about the actual spelling of chords... That Dorian to altered application is one of my favorites.
    Thanks. It's always a great day when I find a new chord. And that is the exact voicing I've been needing for bar 28 of "There Will Never Be.." (Am11 to D7#9).

    Quote Originally Posted by Reg
    I'll try and make another vid...Reg
    It would be great to see you play through the progression a few times at a medium slow speed. Those melodic lines really come alive in context.

    Thanks for your work. It is much appreciated.

  32. #31

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    I think playing through changes can be broken up into pieces.

    For instance:

    How many ways do you know how to play F7 (consider all the extensions and alterations as just being versions of F7)?

    How many ways do you know to create chord movements of or around F7?

    How many ways do you know of to go from F7 to Bb7?

    How many ways do you know of to go from Bb7 back to F7?

    etc.
    ___________________

    These chord movements or progressions that one comes up with are similar to licks. You learn them or create them and then they become part of your vocabulary or part of your bag of tricks. Then you mix and match.

    I've seen a ton of Reg's videos and even a pro like Reg has his favorite voicings and patterns that you can pick up on in his videos. He lays it all out there, learn some of them and build your vocabulary.

    And I'd like to point out, part of what makes Reg sound the way he does is his strong sense of time and ability to swing.
    Last edited by fep; 02-27-2013 at 01:16 AM.

  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by JNGuitar
    Which substitutions work and which do not?
    Not trying to be smart, but all substitutions should theoretically work. That's why they are substitutions. I guess you just have to listen to what chord voicings you like and try to use them in other tunes. Seems like if you know your minor 7 to dominant 7 chords really well, the fancier chords are mostly just variations of those.

    Quote Originally Posted by JNGuitar
    Is there a method of practice for learning and using alternates for each chord (I-IV-V ect.)
    Pretty much any jazz method will cover chord substitution.

    I liked learning chord voicings from the 6th string first because that's the way I first learned my positions. I learned progressions starting with all root notes on the 6th string, then added notes other than the root but keeping all bass notes on the 6th string. Then did the same on the 5th string, then 4th, 3rd and 2nd. By the time you start making 2 string chord voicings things really open up.

  34. #33

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    I don't just play changes.... when I see a series of changes, I see and hear a tonal system. I make a quick analysis as to what's going on from the melody and changes etc...

    Generally changes are collections of Chord Patterns... standard short or sometimes longer progressions that have been used a million times in a million tunes already. They are what we consider standard Jazz practice.

    From that info. I end up with a few target tonal areas...the basic and most important chords...

    From there... I play what I personally choose or what I believe to be implied by the chart or the context I'm playing in.

    As Frank was saying... I have my favorite chord patterns... My personal style. That style is... I play lead lines, different styles of melodies and then just voice them from my standard... Chord Patterns... those pre-established series of chords that I believe represent what ever tune and the context I'm playing that tune in.

    Those pre-established chord patterns already have, subs, approach, passing, inversions, reharms... all the different organized methods for comping, I then plug and play with those chord patterns... reflecting the performance, the context etc...

    I don't memorize and perform from that memorization. I choose an application(s) of a concept of comping. Modal, blues, Melodic Minor... latin, Freddie Green style... what ever and usually there are combinations... And then perform in that style using what I've internalized from my years of practice. I don't learn to play from memorizing tunes.

    I separate My technique... from playing concepts when practicing and combine the two when performing.

    Hope helps... I'll get another sample vid up... asap

    as always thanks Reg

  35. #34

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    Reg, Your example is great as always. I tried to transcribe a bit ... Maybe I'll do the rest also. Please let me know if I've done bad mistakes. I've not be too careful about rhythmic notation. G
    Quote Originally Posted by Reg
    Thought I would post off the Top... sample of some Jazz / Blues comping... Not organized, but if something sounds interesting just ask and I'll go into details etc...
    Attached Images Attached Images

  36. #35

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    This thread is full of great stuff.
    Really enjoyed Ed Bickert and Jack Pearson.
    Two players that are new to me.
    Working with the Don Mock vidoes on Youtube.
    Really learning a lot but have a long long way to go.
    After hearing Ed Bickert I am convinced I will get a Tele someday.

  37. #36

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    Hey gang,

    I recently took a closer look at Sandu, I love the theme.

    I took a look at youtube and sure enough there are many videos of Peter Bernstein slaying this tune, one particular video stood out to me where Peter demonstrates his comping on this tune. He mainly talks about the register since the student was using a register that got a little in the way of Peters soloing.
    He then proceeds to show the following progresssion



    If it doesn't show correctly, it starts at 10:38.

    I have pretty much copied the progression with extra care towards his time feel. I really like what I hear / play, but I don't fully grasp whats going on there. I obviously have very basic knowledge regarding the subs he using - especially the sus chords going and coming from the IV chord, I love that sound and have never ever used it before... sounds very rich and warm, yet modern.

    Anyways. Could someone who is already further into this matter give me / us a hint what Peter is playing there (and if time allows - why)?

    Thanks for your help people!

  38. #37

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    Yea... its pretty simple... peter is just accompanying the melody. he's creating a part that works with and helps set up the head. he's a little all over the place as far as groove... but that part of knowing how to comp. The head sets up Rhythmic Patterns, (also implies harmony), So you end up with an implied.... Harmonic Rhythm.

    You either play attacks of chords with that accent pattern or play a counter accent pattern, somewhat like call and answer or even as peter did ... different standard pedal patterns, like hitting Dominant chord on weak beats....like 2 + 4 . His choice of chords, voicings, subs and added chords are all just standard "Chord Patterns". Like using a Sub... but expanding that Sub to become a series of chords.... Chord Pattern. All of bass lines and chords are from those subs. What make it work even better ... is when one of the players locks in a little more.... or at least creates the perception and feel of better time....The Groove. I mean Sandu is pretty swingin blues.

    You really don't just want to copy the part.... because that's what will happen, you'll just be able to perform a memorized part. A much better approach is to become aware of elements of what he's playing, more detailed examples of what I said above. So you'll actually learn how to play in the style.

    Which becomes... Tonal targets with different ways to approach them. And how you organize those approaches within the Form, or space in the tune. It's just a 12 bar blues... so what do you think are the most important points within the tune. I'll gladly help... but it works better when I just help... I already have all this BS together. Hint start with 12 bars and pick the most important points.

  39. #38

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    So peter is just vamping on II7 V7 I6 VI7 in Db. Don't know why he's in Db... but I believe he's just trying to teach you about simple Chord Patterns.... he eventually gets it together at around 11:28 and gets back to Eb...

    The point would be.../ Eb7 A7 / Ab7 D7 / Db7 B7 / Bb7 E7 / Simple Chord Pattern which implies Eb
    .....................................I7 ..........IV7...........bVII7.......V7... (some people like to think or hear as cycles... but that is only part of the concept)

    If you start to expand the vanilla, (vanilla isn't bad, bass lines are vanilla, I'm pretty vanilla), changes... with use of Blue Notes, modal interchange and melodic minor.... which incorporates Subs, Sus chords and related II- chords with better jazz blues characteristics.... you'll start to create hipper comping feels. And generally you'll start to voice and hear from top or lead lines down.

    The rhythmic thing... we'll that just takes time. But again it's not that complicated.... you just need to have basic organization of Forms and the sections within that Form.

  40. #39

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    I was kind of shocked when Peter said he doesn't like it when the comper plays a walking bass line with chord stabs. WTF? To me that's one of the coolest sounding things the comping guitarist can do in a duet situation. Done judiciously and not overdone of course.

    There are way too many great players who do this for Bernstein to dismiss it as something that "some of these guys do this thing where they ..."

    Berstein is one the most respected and admired Jazz guitarists around today, but this is just his opinion. I can't play worth a $hit, but I know what I like and I like how a walking bass with chord stabs sounds.

    I wonder how some of you feel about this.

  41. #40

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    I think it sounds ok in small doses, but it can get very monotonous after a while. It just isn’t that easy to vary it that much on the guitar, so you can easily end up playing the same thing on every chorus. I think that is Peter’s main objection, I have seen a couple of videos where he says this.

    On the other hand, of course someone like Joe Pass could make it sound pretty good.

    I tend to just throw it in here and there for a few bars, it works better that way for me.

  42. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack E Blue
    I was kind of shocked when Peter said he doesn't like it when the comper plays a walking bass line with chord stabs. WTF? To me that's one of the coolest sounding things the comping guitarist can do in a duet situation. Done judiciously and not overdone of course.

    There are way too many great players who do this for Bernstein to dismiss it as something that "some of these guys do this thing where they ..."

    Berstein is one the most respected and admired Jazz guitarists around today, but this is just his opinion. I can't play worth a $hit, but I know what I like and I like how a walking bass with chord stabs sounds.

    I wonder how some of you feel about this.
    My impression of what he said would fit into what you already said " Done judiciously and not overdone of course" It sets up time great but doesn't add much rhythmically overall and it is done ALOT so it doesn't interest him. He may do a bar or so of it initially for time, then he's off doing something more interesting to him. It's his style. You gotta do what sounds right to you. If you do it enough, you may get bored with it and look for something else more interesting also.

    Bernstein is really good at dissecting out a tune and playing something that references the tune without sounding like he's doing that, especially while soloing. He also has a good blues foundation that he doesn't overuse. I always seem to learn something listening to him play.

  43. #42

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    Yea... here's a clip of Peter with Larry Golding... a much better accompanist. I love Peter's improv his feels but his comping...is cool because he never overplays... but he never really add much either. He tends to comp from bottom up, even when he's in upper register. But then again what do most guitarist also do.


  44. #43

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    Reg and everybody else, I *really* appreciate you taking the time and discussing about this here.


    As a beginner I found the usage of what sounds like sus chords (10:42 and 10:47 and 10:56) really interesting - it creates a really interesting sound to my ear, something I have so far only heard from keyboard players - this was the main attraction to me in the video.



    Quote Originally Posted by Reg
    So peter is just vamping on II7 V7 I6 VI7 in Db. Don't know why he's in Db... but I believe he's just trying to teach you about simple Chord Patterns.... he eventually gets it together at around 11:28 and gets back to Eb...

    The point would be.../ Eb7 A7 / Ab7 D7 / Db7 B7 / Bb7 E7 / Simple Chord Pattern which implies Eb
    .....................................I7 ..........IV7...........bVII7.......V7... (some people like to think or hear as cycles... but that is only part of the concept)

    If you start to expand the vanilla, (vanilla isn't bad, bass lines are vanilla, I'm pretty vanilla), changes... with use of Blue Notes, modal interchange and melodic minor.... which incorporates Subs, Sus chords and related II- chords with better jazz blues characteristics.... you'll start to create hipper comping feels. And generally you'll start to voice and hear from top or lead lines down.

    The rhythmic thing... we'll that just takes time. But again it's not that complicated.... you just need to have basic organization of Forms and the sections within that Form.
    Aha! So I wasn't completely off track here. Db!

    Reg: I will look at the pattern in detail tomorrow - to tired right now.
    Some things I can draw out of your comment immediately:
    1.) I will have to read up on the concept and usage of the bVII7... I will be back with questions!
    2.) What do you mean by usuage of blue notes in comping?
    3.) Melodic Minor its modes and chords are currently in the works (since months and for months/years to come).

    Regarding the straight copying thing - I agree to some extend, but I have to get that stuff under my fingers - get a feel for the sounds. But understanding the concepts of this is definately my goal. In this particular example it is obviously not too much use if the comping is at least partly in Db. :/

  45. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack E Blue
    I was kind of shocked when Peter said he doesn't like it when the comper plays a walking bass line with chord stabs. WTF? To me that's one of the coolest sounding things the comping guitarist can do in a duet situation.
    I also do not like walking bass kinda comping, but I have a specific reason for it, I can not do it , so this attitude spares me the hard work to learn how to do it...

    Joke aside, I love Joe Pass walking bass comping, but the same time i get know (I mean heard) much more airy comping what I like more. Interestingly this airy comping (what I also can not do, but working on it) still can provide such a great groove, I can not stop admiring...

  46. #45

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    In the first video, Peter does in fact do a fair bit of walking bass and chords (at the beginning when they play together). But he varies it a lot, mixing it up with with more ‘open’ comping, also sometimes walking the whole chord around, and so on.

  47. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by djg
    there is no Db turnaround. it is still a plain blues in Eb from 10:40.

    pete plays:

    Eb7sus A7/ Ab9sus Ab7b9/ Gm7b5 (subbing for Eb9) etc.

    take up chris on his offer. he should know this stuff.
    Yea... I hear as target of Db...

    Definitely don't hear the G-7b5... maybe using a voicing of Db6... But the standard Chord pattern would or could be from
    / Eb-9 A13 / Ab13 D9 / Db6/9 Gb13 / F-7b5 Bb7b13 /

    And the Eb-7 becomes Eb7 or Bb-6... The II7.... ever play or listen to Gershwin's "But Not For Me", standard vanilla tune, but fun to play etc...

    he's also using Absus to the Ab7b9... which typically implies Eb-7 Ab7b9 going to Db.....

    Maybe Eb7 A7 / Ab7 Ab7b9/ G-7b5 Gb-7 / F-7 Bb7b13/

    But a plain Blues? And in the style of "Sandu" the "sandu" by Clifford Brown... yea better talk to chris... maybe let the rest of us in also.
    Last edited by Reg; 12-28-2019 at 12:18 PM.

  48. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by Reg
    Yea... I hear as target of Db...

    Definitely don't hear the G-7b5... maybe using a voicing of Db6... But the standard Chord pattern would or could be from
    / Eb-9 A13 / Ab13 D9 / Db6/9 Gb13 / F-7b5 Bb7b13 /

    And the Eb-7 becomes Eb7 or Bb-6... The II7.... ever play or listen to Gershwin's "But Not For Me", standard vanilla tune, but fun to play etc...

    he's also using Absus to the Ab7b9... which typically implies Eb-7 Ab7b9 going to Db.....

    Maybe Eb7 A7 / Ab7 Ab7b9/ G-7b5 Gb-7 / F-7 Bb7b13/

    But a plain Blues? And in the style of "Sandu" the "sandu" by Clifford Brown... yea better talk to chris... maybe let the rest of us in also.
    dude, you can even *see* him grabbing Gm7b5 at 10:43. yes, it's just a vanilla jazz blues in Eb.

    Good examples of jazz blues comping?-pete-jpg
    Last edited by djg; 12-28-2019 at 01:32 PM.

  49. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by djg
    dude, you can even *see* him grabbing Gm7b5 at 10:43. yes, it's just a vanilla jazz blues in Eb.

    Good examples of jazz blues comping?-pete-jpg
    So when does the target become Eb. Even reading through your notation, I still don't see or hear Target of Eb. Yea I see pete grabbing G-7b5.... but I hear Db, the lead note. I believe he is gotten away from tune and implying Db, a mistake.
    So you hear the G-7b5 as a Eb9 in 1st inversion or diatonic sub.. or how ever you choose... Do you hear Blues in Eb, with the Ab9sus, Ab7b9 and then back again as Ab9sus, A9sus... vanilla Eb blues, or even jazz blues. Would love to hear that version.
    Or notate out... i can sight read.

  50. #49
    Maybe it's that I'm not used to listen jazz so much but to me Peter was too much all over the place on comping in this video. Too much cycles so it didn't support the basic harmonic concept and also too much rhythmic things happening all the time. It was difficult to listen soloist. Yeah, I'm not fan of guitarists playing all the time walking bass but it would be nice if accompanist would play simple quarter-note comping and support soloist. Of course the interaction and feeding some rhythmic ideas is great but to me it's hard to listen if it happens all the time. This was just honest opinion from not-great-on-jazz-player that's me.

  51. #50

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    From 10:40, I can hear it as blues, with some effort.
    He's just playing most of chords on beat, evenly spaced, giving them same importance. Forcing it into cycles, only to prove the point he was talking about. Normally, I would expect some of those to be timed and treated differently, as passing chords, ornaments, stabs ... between beats ... So, yes blues, but whould you really play it that way and why? Maybe once, after several regular choruses, to give impression of band being really into it.