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  1. #1

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    Another in our series designed to give traditionalists an apoplectic fit, here are classical guitars played with slides (they appear at 1:00).


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Such a happy muse and they are sad as hell.
    Is it sometimes too difficult a piece?
    ---kidding.

  4. #3

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    Excellent! Sounds a little like 1920s Hawaiian string bands especially with the slide part.

  5. #4

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    I heard a recent explanation where the slide use came from; Doug Macleod explained it as something introduced by bluesmen of old to make the guitar sound more vocal. Sounds plausible to me (even if it just applies to why the technique is used in the blues) and I thus don't see why you couldn't use it in classical music (call it "for prepared guitar" if you have to )

  6. #5

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    There is a guitar duo doing a piece called Antarctica IIRC. I forget the name of the duo so I can't find a video. They both played with bottlenecks, guitars across their laps. I'd firmly put that into the New Music for Prepared Guitar category.

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by docsteve
    ... New Music ...
    How often can they play it before the new rubs off?

    (Quite a few odd terms in music, like in France where the première of a piece is called "la création". "X by Y was created on date such-and-so", which implies extraordinary capabilities in the composer and ditto empathy between him/her and the performing musicians... )

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by RJVB
    How often can they play it before the new rubs off?

    (Quite a few odd terms in music, like in France where the première of a piece is called "la création". "X by Y was created on date such-and-so", which implies extraordinary capabilities in the composer and ditto empathy between him/her and the performing musicians... )
    Neue Musik is a style, not to be confused with new music as in recently composed. Some of it is quite old. The funny thing is that even the century-old stuff can still shock some people.


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  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    Another in our series designed to give traditionalists an apoplectic fit, here are classical guitars played with slides (they appear at 1:00).

    Geez, G,
    Sound like a real crowd pleaser! Remember the words of Herr Nietzsche from "Twilight of the Idols"--That which does not kill me, makes me stronger.*"
    Live spielen . . . Marinero



    * Was mich nicht umbringt, macht mich stärker."

  10. #9

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    I did have a thought after my last post. LAGC is an outstanding group of musicians. Early in my musical life, I used Scott Tennant's "Pumping Nylon" book on technique and still use some of the exercises today. Kanengeiser was also a soloist as was/is Andrew York(former member). So, there's no questioning the pedigree of musicianship. However, this piece is representative of what musicians feel what they must do to connect with an audience in today's New Millenia. It's done musically and with a creative flair but its a P.T. Barnum dog and pony show for audiences of today with limited attention spans. It, for me, denigrates the experience to an America's Got Talent level--something that should never be associated with musicians of this class. Imagine Rubenstein or Wilhelm Kempff playing the keys of the piano with a toilet plunger or Segovia using a slide? What's the point other than tickling the senses of the unwashed masses? Sometimes, in life, we must accept that new is not always better. . . that innovation fails . . . and that parlor tricks are just that . . . parlor tricks. There are no substitutes for standards in Art. Innovation is intellectual, spiritual, and imaginative . . . You won't find it in a box of Cracker Jacks.
    Play live . . . Marinero



  11. #10

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    Actually it is a serious tribute to Chet Atkins and comes from an album called Guitar Heroes, in which the LAGQ wrote or arranged pieces paying tribute to various guitarists who influenced them. I doubt it was conceived as a ‘classical’ album as such.

    It is in fact a very enjoyable record on its own terms, I’ve got it.

    Guitar Heroes - Wikipedia

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    Another in our series designed to give traditionalists an apoplectic fit.
    Seems to be working, anyway.

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    However, this piece is representative of what musicians feel what they must do to connect with an audience in today's New Millenia. It's done musically and with a creative flair but its a P.T. Barnum dog and pony show for audiences of today with limited attention spans.
    I believe you used to play the sax in funk bands in strip clubs, with dancers in bikinis?

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    I believe you used to play the sax in funk bands in strip clubs, with dancers in bikinis?
    But that wasn't classical music or using a classical music instrument (surely there's a difference between a sax used in CM and one used in some other kind of music? )

    The slide piece didn't really come across like bread for the plebs, certainly not from the (lack of) expressions on the musicians' faces, nor from the late (in that context) arrival of the slide work. I'm too lazy to go check how the audience reacted.
    Here's something that does tip the scales in the wrong direction for me:

    (but maybe they're actually failed clones of Tommy Emmanuel who just happened to be playing classical guitars in their recordings of this piece? )

  15. #14

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    By the way here’s another track from the ‘Guitar Heroes’ album, a Ralph Towner tune this time.


  16. #15

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    BTW ... LAGQ ... no a quartet of these, I presume?

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    I believe you used to play the sax in funk bands in strip clubs, with dancers in bikinis?
    Hi, G,
    Yes, but it was the soup du jour and expected for successful top Funk/Soul/R@B groups in Chicago during those years. I don't think "Bottle Classical" is part of a CG's repertoire, yet, and if it were . . . it would be analogous to grandma's dreaded split pea. Look, G . . . I'm not trying to change the world . . . just save myself in what I perceive to be a decline in standards universally. I don't care what the rest of the world does as long as it doesn't start creeping in my direction. By the way, have you read Sartre's Classic "No Exit?" and "Nausea"? Certainly, Sartre says it better.
    Play live . . . Marinero

  18. #17

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    Just wanted to check I remembered that correctly. I was struggling to picture the forum’s self-appointed high-priest of culture performing in a strip joint, that’s all.

    As it happens I studied existentialism and read La Nausee in French as part of my French degree. It includes some passages about music, where the narrator (Roquentin) dismisses Chopin as a form of bourgeois consolation for his aunt. Instead he finds relief from his nausea by listening to a jazz record (Some of These Days).

    It’s interesting that Sartre seemed to place jazz on a higher footing than classical music.

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    Just wanted to check I remembered that correctly. I was struggling to picture the forum’s self-appointed high-priest of culture performing in a strip joint, that’s all.

    As it happens I studied existentialism and read La Nausee in French as part of my French degree. It includes some passages about music, where the narrator (Roquentin) dismisses Chopin as a form of bourgeois consolation for his aunt. Instead he finds relief from his nausea by listening to a jazz record (Some of These Days).

    It’s interesting that Sartre seemed to place jazz on a higher footing than classical music.
    Hi, G,
    I've said numerous times, I cherish those early musical experiences as a major element in my personal growth. We all travel roads throughout our lives . . . however, for most, they're rather antiseptic and banal. This was hardly the case in those years. In regards to Sartre, I think I've read most of his writing and he is still one of my favorite authors as is the Existentialist premise/mentality. Unlike Roquentin, I don't see Jazz/Classical on differing levels but rather as equal-footed, superlative musical forms. Interestingly, Sartre embraced Marxism throughout his life so his labeling Chopin as bourgeois was not surprising since Jazz would have been seen as revolutionary and opposed to the status quo of Classical Music. However, I'm not picky about a person's politics when they produce great Art although political/sociological diatribes fall into another category for me--not Art. Finally, I do not judge an artist by his personal life but only by his/her Art since many artists are living contradictions of Art and Life. For me, in no serious moment, would Sartre denigrate Chopin's Art but rather uses him as a startling juxtaposition between Old and New; traditional and revolutionary and he does it through his protagonist--Roquentin. Thanks for your thoughtful reply.
    Play live . . . Marinero

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    a major element in my personal growth.
    Would this be why so few of us have become high priests ... the fact we had to obtain that particular from of personal growth from whatever Playboy like magazines we could get our filthy little hands on, instead of letting our eyes wander in a strip joint?

  21. #20

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    A couple of my favorite classical slide guitarists




  22. #21

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    They certainly look very classical


    This thread put me into iconoclast cooking mode tonight ... decided to season those pork chops with ras-al-hanout O:-)

  23. #22

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    Anyway if the strip club was any good they wouldn’t need anyone to…
    ready…
    play live.

    ’cuse me i got to get back to listening to Hooked On Classics

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by RJVB
    They certainly look very classical


    This thread put me into iconoclast cooking mode tonight ... decided to season those pork chops with ras-al-hanout O:-)
    Garam Masala makes a great steak rub BTW

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by BWV
    Garam Masala makes a great steak rub BTW
    Probably, but AFAIK it will have less potential to give some puritan a hissing fit

    Now, marinating a good piece of beef in C/P Cola, that's been known to give hissing fits based on purely culinary principles (but done well the result is really good)