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  1. #1

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    Here is my attempt at Hans Werner Henze’s Sir Andrew Aguecheek, from the second book of Royal Winter Music. Recorded my playing with the score, as full disclosure, there were several edits. Anyway, beautiful piece with very interesting quasi- E minor tonality.


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  3. #2

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    I've not heard any of the Royal Winter Music before. Sounds good to me, very effective and atmospheric.

    I wouldn't worry about the edits, even Bream had quite a few of them on his recordings, you can hear them sometimes!

    I looked up what Bream says about this music in the book 'A life on the road'. The main thing he says is that he can't remember whether he ever paid Henze for it!

  4. #3

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    The other thing he said that all atonal guitar music sounded as if it was in E Minor.


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  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    I've not heard any of the Royal Winter Music before. Sounds good to me, very effective and atmospheric.

    I wouldn't worry about the edits, even Bream had quite a few of them on his recordings, you can hear them sometimes!

    I looked up what Bream says about this music in the book 'A life on the road'. The main thing he says is that he can't remember whether he ever paid Henze for it!
    Thanks - think the second set of RWM is more accessible than the first, but love them both. Dont know the details, but Bream and Henze fell out over the second set, which Bream never performed. The first recording I believe was David Tannenbaum some years later. The third piece, Mad Lady MacBeth, is a beast technically, which may have been part of the reason Bream did not play it (not that he lacked the ability, think he did not want to devote the time)


  6. #5

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    Bream says something about that in 'A life on the road'. He says two of the movements are 'really lovely' but the third seems 'unplayable', so he wrote and suggested that Henze should re-write it. Henze said he would show it to another guitarist in Cologne (doesn't say who) and get a second opinion.

    No idea what happened after that!

  7. #6

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    Anyone who attempts any movement of the Royal Winter Music deserves a pat on the back. Well, Steve, that video is a year old, so how do you feel about it now?
    I played his Drei Tentos some thirty years ago, but was too chicken to take on the RWM.

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop
    Anyone who attempts any movement of the Royal Winter Music deserves a pat on the back. Well, Steve, that video is a year old, so how do you feel about it now?
    I played his Drei Tentos some thirty years ago, but was too chicken to take on the RWM.
    I cant play it now, stopped practicing it, was alot of work

    This particular piece is not more difficult than the Drei Tentos, which I have also played - the texture and range is more guitaristic, but still some knuckle-busting chords

  9. #8

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    It's hard to square Henze's tribute to Sir Andrew Aguecheek with the latter's Wiki description of him:

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek is a comic character in William Shakespeare's play Twelfth Night, or What You Will. One of the supporting characters, Sir Andrew is a stereotypical fool, who is goaded into unwisely duelling with Cesario and who is slowly having his money pilfered by Sir Toby Belch.

  10. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop
    It's hard to square Henze's tribute to Sir Andrew Aguecheek with the latter's Wiki description of him:

    Sir Andrew Aguecheek is a comic character in William Shakespeare's play Twelfth Night, or What You Will. One of the supporting characters, Sir Andrew is a stereotypical fool, who is goaded into unwisely duelling with Cesario and who is slowly having his money pilfered by Sir Toby Belch.
    I dont know Twelfth Night that well, but took it as a 'tragic clown' sort of thing - Here is Henze's description in the score:

    Aguecheek was one of my favorites when I was a music student in Braunschweig. Perhaps it was not just Shakespeare but also the producer and the actor of Aguecheek who caused me not to miss a single performance of 'What You Will' at the theatre there around 1943. The comic ele-ment in Aguecheek's character is his inability to find his bearing in this world and to live in it-indeed, he appears, even from a physical point of view, unfit to live. But there is, at the same time, a tenderness about him, and a sadness like that emanating from a witting meadow-saffron. He is on his way to the flowers to become himself a flower, a thistle probably, or some-thing quite impossible even in the world of plants. He also has the scent of flowers, and he combs his long golden and English hair


  11. #10

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    Well, that all makes sense now