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  1. #1
    I've been playing classical guitar for a couple years now and am currently studying it in college.

    I was wondering about everyone's opinion on how the knowledge of classical might translate into jazz.

    I'm debating transferring into a jazz program; but I see so many people who have learned jazz on their own. (All my jazz progress has been on my own so far)

    Has anyone here studied jazz in college?

    I can't decide whether to continue my classical studies and keep jazz on my own or to study jazz and have a classical background.

    Any experiences?

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Would you like to be able to do this?


  4. #3

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    I can't speak to the educational part, since I haven't formally "studied" classical in school, but I do play classical and Flamenco pieces frequently and I can tell you that the finger dexterity and technique that teaches translates very, very well to fingerstyle jazz for solo guitar. If I hadn't played classical stuff, I'd have been utterly lost with things like chord melody when I started trying my hand at jazz arrangements.

  5. #4

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    I took classical for a couple of years to develop my right hand for country blues stuff. Wound up falling in love with the music. Worked up enough peices and modern stuff in classical style to play a lunch gig at a local hippy eatery.

    Moved to another town, and never went back to it. However, I have never stopped benefiting from the right hand technique or the reading skills I learned from it. After a few years of moving, I wanted to study again, but chose jazz instead, as I believe jazz players are the best all around players on the planet.

    Classical teaches reading and the instrument very well, but it is a pretty defined box. Jazz covers everything, which is part of the problem. You need 2-3 lifetimes to master jazz imo. Either way, hard to go wrong. Just depends on what kind of music you want to play, and whether you want to play out or not.

  6. #5
    I'll keep those things in mind. Classical has definitely helped chord-melody-it has the potential to be very confusing without the right hand coordination.

    I'm going to keep playing jazz and classical, but I believe the classical is going to stay in the background. Jazz has a lot more to it; I think I'm going to need as much time as I can get.

  7. #6

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    Have you ever listened to Charlie Byrd. One of the most remarkable musicians I've ever heard. He's classical to the core but can still swing. Check this out.



    he's the man.

  8. #7
    I enjoyed that. Thanks a lot.

  9. #8

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    I have some experience of the classical vs jazz issue. I began playing rock and anything else anyone would pay me for in the 1960s, got totally bored, started an interest in jazz only then to focus entirely on classical guitar for thirty years. This entailed college and all the rest of it.

    The big problem for someone not starting on classical is a technical one; position of the left hand, appropriate use of the correct fingers etc, not to mention the different guitar neck sizes between one style and the other. The other problem was a lot of 'stuffed shirts' thinking that jazz was beneath them.

    My solution to the fact that I didn't think I could utilise both techniques was to go in the classical direction and to simply appreciate my love of jazz by continuing to listen to others. I now think I was wrong. I should have gone for both even with the abovementioned problems.

    Musically, the scales are slightly different and jazz uses some fingerings that would never be accepted in the classical world. Similarly, jazz chords won't crop up either, least of all the positions that one tends to get one's fingers into.

    So in answer to the question on "how the knowledge of classical might translate into jazz", it was for me minimal, although my knowldge of musical form learned through classical playing was very valuable. Therefore, my advice, for what it's worth, is not to get into the either/or situation, but to carry on doing both...and don't let anyone tell you that one form is more 'serious' than the other.
    Last edited by Ged; 03-26-2008 at 08:50 AM. Reason: Error

  10. #9

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    Fastest way to "unstuff" a classical shirt is to remove the sheet music from their stand.

    Not saying that classical players can't improvise, of course, but from my experience with classical it is not really oriented toward that. If I could improvise my way to sounding like Bach (while not just playing it from memory, mind you), I wouldn't be chatting here, I'd be making history. Sweeeeet!!!

  11. #10

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    Indeed, although decent players learn the dots which allows you to focus more on expression and sound quality. But I've yet to meet anyone from the classical guitar tradition that could improvise, and I've known a few. Yet they should be able to to some extent. In Bach's time it was considered particularly boring to play the repeats exactly the same way without some embellishment. And after all, Mozart was probably the prime exponent of improvisation. I believe that all that has got lost over time due to the 'elevated' position that classical music has given itself. All we're really left with on the improvisation front is cadenzas, and you have to be a genius like Barenboim to excel on those.

    And finally, completely off the discussion, I saw Jim Mullen over the weekend (not for the first time either). He is possibly Britain's finest jazz guitarist; not just technically, but musically as well. I'd also recommend Gary Potter, another great player who hails partly from the 'Django' school. If anyone gets a chance to see these guys you'll see why.

    See Mullen at
    . I was there on both occasions.

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Goofsus4 View Post
    Fastest way to "unstuff" a classical shirt is to remove the sheet music from their stand.
    As a classical player, too, as well as jazz, I'll give my "Amen". But, can I at least have my jazz "charts" and my "Real Book" handy?

    I've found that studying different styles has improved all of them, to one degree or another. An interesting fact: when you study/play different styles, many times, you're also playing on different instruments. This can also be beneficial, in that you will have less tendency to rely on "muscle-memory", and will have to "learn" the fretboard, scales, chords, and so on. A classical neck just ain't the same as my Les Paul 50's neck, which is different than my es-335, which is not the same as a Fender neck....you get the idea. You'll have to mentally "slow-down" enough to adjust to your instrument, music style, and playing style (pick or fingers).
    All that being said, adding other styles to your study will help you a lot.
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  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by neilio View Post
    I've found that studying different styles has improved all of them, to one degree or another. All that being said, adding other styles to your study will help you a lot.
    I will give a strong second to that! I will also say that at least some study/playing of classical is important if for no other reason than to get some of the finest music ever created under your fingers. Classical music is music with a capital "M." I mean, I can play something from Satie, and just sit there and think, "How is it possible to imagine such beauty?" Jazz is hip and cool and fun, and sometimes beautiful (many of the standards are), but I'm not going to get moved to tears listening to jazz, but am proud to say I've had that pleasure many times listening to classical.

  14. #13

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    Hello, everyone!
    I recommend you to visit the youtube and watch a few videos of Paco de Lucía, the most famous flamenco guitar player in Spain, and take a look at his right hand.
    I warn you! He always plays with his fingers but he has a lot of right hand playing techniques and I think that some of you will like it.

    Bye bye!

  15. #14

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    a similar aproach to those used by Paco de Lucia or Charlie Byrd would be Baden Powell, amazing brazilian guitarist (please excuse my english, is it aproach or approach?)

  16. #15

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    Listen to Ken Hatfield. Keeping your mind open to different styles and techniques should minimize this issue. Learn every technique YOU find interesting, and don't listen to anyone who builds walls between labels.
    Ken Hatfield

    He has a great book on jazz for the classical guitarist that really obliterates the perception that they don't mix. I highly recommend it.

  17. #16

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    I agree with all of you, I think keeping your mind open to different styles and techniques is a great way of improving yourself as a musician and a person in general. As long as you have enough time, I would keep practicing both. (Actually, I practice 4 instruments regularly!) One day, you may have to choose one or the other for a while (probably not for the rest of your life thought), but you will always benefit from your knowledge of both instruments.

  18. #17

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    Thank-you for the recommendation of Ken Hatfield's book, "Jazz and the Classical Guitar". I just ordered it. I've always been a classical guitarist never playing Jazz before and have been searching for something to help me make the transfer from the classical way of playing to playing jazz. I'm anxious for it to arrive!

  19. #18

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    I have played classical for a very long time, and when I was in school and did small ensemble (jazz), I really didn't like it. I felt people were just playing scales and arpeggios over a set of chords, and it seemed to lack any real direction. What I didn't understand, was that was the first step to 'letting go' of firmly structured music - a sort of transition if you will.

    Since classical guitar music is played/memorized literally from sheet music, and jazz is at the opposite end of the spectrum; the approach to the music has to change as well, which I find is difficult to do.

    Although I have been trying to play jazz for about a year now, I still find it very difficult to improvise without falling back on licks, and passages I've played before -- which is frustrating to say the least.

    As far as the technical skills I learned while playing classical (and banjo), they do transfer very nicely. As such, I find finger picking preferable and haven't used a guitar pick to play jazz in about 4 or 5 months now.

    In a nutshell, the lesson I have learned is that while classical music is wonderful and truly fun to play, it does not actually require much thought once you've learned the songs. Jazz on the other hand, requires the player to think a couple steps ahead and be prepared for the song to change dynamically.
    ...practice is fun

  20. #19

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    Hi, everyone!
    I agree with GravyTrain. Classical music is not intended for improvisation (unless you want to do what Yngwie Malmsteen does with a classical guitar).
    The only thing I believe jazz and classical music have in common is most of the theory but the purpose is opposite. Classical music is for interpretation and jazz for improvising.
    One can improvise classical music but...

  21. #20

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    Well I would say that classical music is not intended for improvisation today, but we have to remember that all of these great composers were amazing improvisers.

    Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Chopin, Liszt etc were all known in there day as great improvisers. A lot of their solo piano pieces were written down on performances based on their improvisations. Bach's "A Musical Offering" was wrtitten after he was asked to improvise several fugue's on a them given to him by the king(or some royalty). He was not happy with his performance so he went home that night and began writing the book that is now one of the most legendary collections of classical music around.

    In fact, one of the only reasons why classical musicians started writing music down back in the day was to sell it to the masses. It was their version of a CD, they considered scores to be a "snapshot" of a performance that could be left open for interpretation by the performer.

    Unfortunately most classical musicians have forgotten about this great heritage and do not improvise at all these days, unless they are into really modern post tonal music.

    On a brighter side, a lot of heavy classical conservatories and college programs are requiring classical majors to study a few semesters of improvisation. I think this is great, maybe it will bring the jazzers and classical cats closer together.

    And if we think blowing on a few tonal changes is hard, just imagine the level of musicianship it took Bach and others to improvise a fugue!!!

    MW

  22. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by One Up,One Down View Post

    I was wondering about everyone's opinion on how the knowledge of classical might translate into jazz.

    My teacher told me that I can use the melody lines from classical music into our jazz improvisation. For instance, you find this descending arpeggio very memorable in one of Bach's pieces, so you can copy it down and use it as you improvise over some lines on your jazz pieces.

    I find classical training very rigid however, instead, I realize that jazz knowledge helps me a lot in classical. I am going through proper lessons in classical guitar and I find that most of the time, I am playing all the pieces blindly. Yes, my classical teacher is always teaching me on how to express the classical pieces using a variety of tone changes and dynamics, however, what is truly lacking is the understanding of the music. Most of my friends may not even know what chord they are playing in a classical piece. They can play for me Prelude no.1 by Heitor Villa Lobos but they do not know what chords are being used. However, having some knowledge in jazz, i could appreciate better the diminished and half-diminished chords used by Villa-Lobos. It also helps me to recognize what I am doing and remembering the piece.

  23. #22

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    I dabble in both classical and jazz (along with other styles). It's all fun. Classical is sure specific about right hand positioning/technique and tone. This is beneficial to other styles.

    Check this jazz guy playing classical in a jazzy way (warning this may cause some to give up music all together) - this guy was self taught and played by ear

    Last edited by fep; 08-15-2008 at 10:49 AM.

  24. #23

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    Thank you for the Art Tatum's video!

    If you will, check also this famous classical pianist playing something which, for lack of a better word, I'd call "beethovenian jazz":


  25. #24

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    Here's Oscar Peterson taking the opposite route and classicaling up a jazz piece:


  26. #25

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    Wow, the fabulous OP!

    Here's an excerpt from the entry "Oscar Peterson" in Wikipedia:
    Under his sister's tutelage, Peterson expanded into classical piano training and broadened his range while mastering the core classical pianism from rigorous scales to such staples of every pianist's repertoire as preludes and fugues by Johann Sebastian Bach.
    Building on Art Tatum's pianism and aesthetics, Peterson also absorbed Tatum's musical influences, notably from piano concertos by Sergei Rachmaninoff. Rachmaninoff's harmonizations, as well as direct quotations from his second piano concerto, are thrown here and there in many recordings by Peterson
    you can here Nina Simone playing... baroque jazz?

    I wonder if such giants would agree on the "vs." in this thread's title...

  27. #26

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    I bought a biography of Oscar Peterson and apparently he and Art Tatum were good friends. The last time Oscar saw Tatum, Tatum knew he was gonna die so he said to him: "You're it now, man, you're the next guy." Oscar said no, but that's how it turned out

  28. #27

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    The preciseness required in classical playing often sounds stiff to me when applied to jazz. The freedom jazz playing allows often sounds sloppy when applied to classical.

    For example, playing out of time and out of key in jazz can be a good thing. Playing out of time and out of key in classical is usually a bad thing.

    Not to say that jazz is not precise and classical is not free, but each seems to require a different kind of preciseness and freedom. It generally appears really tough for most players to get to where the desireable characteristics for each style is second nature.

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrbeantheconqueror View Post
    My teacher told me that I can use the melody lines from classical music into our jazz improvisation. For instance, you find this descending arpeggio very memorable in one of Bach's pieces, so you can copy it down and use it as you improvise over some lines on your jazz pieces.

    I find classical training very rigid however, instead, I realize that jazz knowledge helps me a lot in classical. I am going through proper lessons in classical guitar and I find that most of the time, I am playing all the pieces blindly. Yes, my classical teacher is always teaching me on how to express the classical pieces using a variety of tone changes and dynamics, however, what is truly lacking is the understanding of the music. Most of my friends may not even know what chord they are playing in a classical piece. They can play for me Prelude no.1 by Heitor Villa Lobos but they do not know what chords are being used. However, having some knowledge in jazz, i could appreciate better the diminished and half-diminished chords used by Villa-Lobos. It also helps me to recognize what I am doing and remembering the piece.
    Having played classical guitar for over thirty years I became a damned good sight-reader and could play any Bach fugue you cared to throw at me. But I certainly agree with the contention that classical players don't really understand the nature of the chords they are playing even though I studied figured harmony at college. It's all about interpretation, tone, and of course technique without which you might as well not bother. The problem with many classical teachers is unless you do it like them, it's all wrong! We've all got our favourite players (mine is Julian Bream), but because of the wide range of styles even within jazz, this doesn't apply to that genre. However, my advice to anyone wondering whether to play jazz or classical is don't do what I did and simply go for the latter; do both, enjoy practising in both styles, and see which one comes out on top. In this way you also avoid becoming a prejudiced and closed-minded individual where classical becomes the only 'proper' way of playing. I also used to play the lute and you wouldn't believe the arguments that went on between those who played with nails and those who thought that doing so was a criminal offence worthy of execution!

    I was lucky (in a way) because having had a minor stroke in 2004 and losing the power in my left hand (I could hardly move it for months), my long love of jazz meant that I have now gone in that direction due to poor nails. (Apparently, illness can show itself in the nails). All is now fine, the technique is back and the only thing missing is the ability to come up with my own ideas instead of something written on a stave. But, I'll get there, and if death gets me first, well, it was fun along the way!

    Finally, a question: can anyone recommend to me a small battery driven amplifier, 15 watts absolute max, probably less, which at least has reverb and is suitable for jazz, Wes-type sound?

    Thanks.

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ged View Post

    Finally, a question: can anyone recommend to me a small battery driven amplifier, 15 watts absolute max, probably less, which at least has reverb and is suitable for jazz, Wes-type sound?

    Thanks.
    The Roland micro-cube; it runs on AC or batteries, is really small, and for a tiny amp really does sound surprisingly good.

    Buy Roland Micro Cube Combo Amp online at Musician's Friend


  31. #30

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    That's a lot of good advice Ged, and a hell of a story. I wish you well. I couldn't agree more about combining the styles. When I practice either of these styles, I'm a better player in the other because of it.

  32. #31

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    Great post Ged, best of luck! I'm also a long time classical player and I'm having a heck of a time with jazz; although I think I enjoy it more. Wish I had done BOTH all along.

    Still play nylon for jazz, with nails, but why is jazz so hard for us classical guitarists??

    Sailor

  33. #32

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    This is such an interesting discussion. Everybody's input is fantastic. I enjoy reading what everybody has written.

    Classical and jazz are two seperate idioms. Classical is apart of the European tradition. Many Westerners here in the States that play classical, especially the ones I've met can't improvise on a 12-bar blues. This has to do with the training that is instilled in them through years of studying the classical repertoire, practicing, and discipline.

    Jazz, on the other hand, originated here in the States. It is a very complex music that owes as much to the blues as it does anything else. Most of the jazz musicians that I know can play classical, but their knowledge of is very limited to a few pieces. The thing that makes a jazz musician great is his ability to improvise. This is something that classical musicians struggle with or at least in my experience they have. Learn how to hear the music by your ear and gut feeling.

    The thing that is key to learning jazz is harmony. Jazz has it's own unique approach harmony through chords like dominant, major/minor 7th, major/minor 9th, augmented, etc. Learn all you can about chord voicings, which are crucial to accompanying a soloist. As far as scales and modes are concerned, learn all of them, but probably the most frequently used modes in jazz are Dorian, Lydian, Locrian, Whole Tone, and Mixolydian. Learn how to apply these modes to jazz harmony.

    These are a few things that divide classical and jazz. Don't EVER give up playing classical, which I'm sure you won't, because classical has a lot of vital information in terms of technique, sight-reading, and overall theory. I wish I studied classical first before diving head-first into jazz. Unfortunately, the damage is already done! I can't go back now!

    Best of luck to you in your discovery of jazz. Hope this in some small way sheds some light in your direction.

  34. #33

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    friselfan - I'll bet if you studied classical first you'd be in the same predicament as the rest of us late-comers to jazz. I think we want to understand it before we can play it!

    Your post was great, excellent insight!

    Sailor

  35. #34

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    This is a nice apropos thread to come in on. (2nd post here.) In midlife I crossed the divide and learned my fingerboard harmony so I could take the gigs that were coming my way. Then hanging out with some jazz-educated musicians - they began to enlighten me about the improv / composition continuum in useful, practical ways that allowed me to transform myself into - well, not a jazz guitarist, probably never will be, but a successful working commercial musician with no shortage of work. Trying to play classical guitar music for a living has this continual subtext of willing listeners asking for all kinds of music -- like, a great game of "stump the classical guitarist" - nope, can't play that, sure you wouldn't like to hear "recuerdos" again? After my shall we say conversion? I still sit in a chair with a footstool & look like a nerd but have a broad repertory of things to make tourists, brides, & other paying clients happy

  36. #35

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    I'm a long time classical player that has come to jazz later in life too. I did have a bit of experience playing CAGED system based pentatonics over blues and rock'n roll changes, but little beyond that. First, the chops that I've learned playing the music and scales in classical study has been invaluable in learning jazz. (Note to students: Listen to these guys that write on here and learn your scales! Really, Really WELL!) That and analyzing classical pieces. As far as I can seen there's little difference in analyzing a piece be it classical or jazz (although I don't look for the French 6th vs the German 6th in jazz lol).

    I also learned how chords are built in this study and that has made a huge difference in learning jazz. When I started to gig, I found myself in the same position that Jack writes about above. I'd often hear "That Bach is nice man, but don't you know any Skynard?" or somesuch. This lead me to start writing chord melody arrangements of jazz and pop tunes. That was a great learning experience too and I've become fairly adept at it. Hugely, it gave me music to practice that I could "swing". A drawback though is that when I did make a jazz chord-melody arrangement, I still did it with a classical guitar player's mentality — I learned my arrangement, and I played it that way. My ability to play them with a pretty good swing feel, would give the impression to the listener that I was improvising, when actually I wasn't.

    Someone mentioned above that many classical (only) players seem "stiff". I couldn't agree more. These jazz-style chord melody arrangements not only helped me to get the stick out of my ass, but also gave me better insight into how I wanted my classical playing to sound. I hesitate to say I make them "swing" but I am very aware of giving them the sense of momentum and movement that gives jazz (or pop music for that matter) such appeal. This mental approach to movement has been invaluable to me and I take this approach with every new classical piece I learn. Remember, I remind myself, you're playing a piece of music here, not just fingering around a fretboard.

    All that said, when I've had the most success in improvising over jazz tunes at this point in my learning, I've done it the way FrisellFan describes it so well above. I forget about all the daunting lessons, shut my eyes and listened. I forget about "where I am on the fretboard" and just go for it. It comes from the heart. The only thing I can add to that is it is most helpful to pick the tune you want to play and just learn the melody straight-up at first with little or no improv — and learn to do this everywhere on the neck that it can be done. Build your muscle memory around that melody and then let go. The players I enjoy listening to the most are the ones that stick to the tune as opposed to running through their bag of licks, no matter the tune. In my mind this is how Bach or Mozart would do it — arguably the greatest improvisers of all.
    Last edited by Herby; 09-10-2008 at 01:16 PM.

  37. #36

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    I went through a very long period (back 25 years) of cheerfully doing free solo improvisation as part of my schtick in restaurants. I would free associate tunes in 15 or 30 second chunks because that appeared to be the attention span of the folks around me, or alternatively just do 20 minute fantasias and go into my own zone if that seemed appropriate. (These mixed with playing my regular arrangements & pieces.) Playing with other people and particularly playing guitar duets full time for the last few years has imposed a necessary discipline on my improvisation habits, meaning constraining me to stick to the form of the tune OR write out a chart for a different form, and this having an effect in turn on my arranging and composing.

    I've mostly abandoned classical repertory for public performance except for the absolute grade-A classical-hit-parade material: Spanish Romance, Fur Elise (complete version possible on 2 guitars easily), Recuerdos, Schubert's Ave Maria & Pachelbel's Canon (necessary wedding material), etc.

    We keep a running list of requested songs... when the requests get to something resembling critical mass for a given tune, I break down and start working on an arrangement ... guess I've got a 3 year or so backlog! It takes a lot longer to work up a real duet arrangement of a new tune than it does to hack an arrangement from a lead sheet (which we do often enough) or to work up a solo arrangement, because of the necessary individual and collective practice time and because of my frequent trial versions and revisions. A solo arrangement I can play while it's still in process, to some degree, covering faults with improv, but a "beta" performance of an arranged duet has proven to be likely to be embarrassing.

  38. #37

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    I love this thread! My only comment this time refers to classical players seeming a little stiff. There were historical periods of western music where "restraint " was a stylistic form.( age of reason, classical restraint, reaction to baroque ornamentation, etc.......) You definitely wouldn't want to "swing" Haydn! I get the intent of some of these comments and I now personally prefer jazz, especially standards, to a lot of my old classical repertoire; But it's worth remembering diversity in music style is everything. I like stiff, swing, and everything in between.

    Sailor

  39. #38

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    I love this thread too. Sailor makes some great points here. Since I'm one of the ones that said some classical players can seem "stiff" it got me to thinking. I feel like I may be trying to define the indefinable here, but when I see, or better put, hear someone I think of as stiff, I'm not getting that feeling of movement and momentum I was trying to explain. Maybe I should say "forward motion". Regardless of the viable stylistic forms Sailor insightfully mentions, I think the music still has to "move". It's all about keeping time. When I'm playing Bach for instance, I'm not really thinking "swing", but I AM trying to keep just as good time as a good jazz player does on a swing tune, although the "feel" is different. I also want to feel the ease of physical movement (in my hands) between chords/notes that jazz players present. If I get someone's toe tapping, it makes me happy. Even impressionistic pieces, say Debussy or Ravel, where there is so much emotion built through the mixture of straight time and rubato, there is that ebb and flow of forward motion I'm trying to describe.

    You read in the forum all the time about listening to jazz musicians other then guitar players — Art Tatum, Oscar Peterson, Charlie Parker, John Coltrane, et al. The same can be true of studying classical guitar. Listen to Vladimir Horowitz and hear how it can sound.

    Herb
    Let's not forget it's September 11th.

  40. #39

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    Herby, love your responses! I too like the flow and rubato of the impressionists and composers like Manuel Ponce and Villa-Lobos. I think the strict, almost mechanical time of Haydn and Mozart is delightful in it's rigidity too!

    Right now I'm just enjoying playing old jazz standards and wish I had come to this decades ago!

    Sailor

  41. #40

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    Thank you Sailor! LOL. You're obviously a man of extremely high standards and very refined taste! : )

  42. #41

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    No offense to the person who posted this topic: this subject of this vs. that is juvenile. Classical vs. jazz? Give me a break!

    That's like saying apples vs. oranges. I like both of them because they both taste different. One is not better than the other one.

  43. #42

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    I think this has been a great thread, not juvenile at all! I think the intent has been to share ideas between classical players that have discovered jazz. I wouldn't get hung up on semantics like "VS". How about compare and contrast? I also don't think composers like Gershwin would consider classical and jazz apples and oranges. Serious music shares serious elements.

    Sailor

  44. #43

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    Yeah. I think if you read the heading of the post and not the post itself it might appear juvenile. In reality though, he asks a legit question. On the surface, classical guitar and jazz guitar are very different, but how might one apply techniques that they've learned in one to aid them in playing the other? or can you? Totally legit question.

  45. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by frisellfan19 View Post
    This is such an interesting discussion. Everybody's input is fantastic. I enjoy reading what everybody has written.
    Quote Originally Posted by frisellfan19 View Post
    No offense to the person who posted this topic: this subject of this vs. that is juvenile. Classical vs. jazz? Give me a break!
    Huh?

    And why is it so often when someone starts with the words "No Offense" that something offensive is surely to follow right after?

  46. #45

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    Yeah, why the change of mood, what made this thread turn sour to you?

    Just curious.

    MW

  47. #46

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    Right on. Great thread!!

    Sailor

  48. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by frisellfan19 View Post
    No offense to the person who posted this topic: this subject of this vs. that is juvenile. Classical vs. jazz? Give me a break!

    That's like saying apples vs. oranges. I like both of them because they both taste different. One is not better than the other one.
    Hi Frisellfan,
    I think you missed the point here. It's not a "vs" thing really. From my personal point of view and experience, this discussion is about a personal evolution of style and awareness. My classical training was both (1) extremely valuable, and (2) remarkably limiting in some critical ways. My strongest early mentors had severe prejudices against pop, folk, rock and jazz styles, which is to say virtually anything "non-classical", and while their tastes were defensible in their world, their prejudice against jazz - which I inherited for part of my life, before I reflected on it AND had my nosed rubbed in my deficiencies - served effectively as a vaccination against learning practical fingerboard harmony in the very useful way that jazz guitarists must know it in order to play. Breaking through that old way of thinking was as important in my life as, for instance, the experience of some people who come to question the religious tradition that they were born into. The level of the discussion in this thread may be trivial sometimes, but that's part of the general nature of internet discussions in this day and age - you might say there's a fairly low signal to noise ratio in internet forums generally.

    The classical guitar world can be pretty snooty. Segovia himself, as a career-long general policy, was really careful to keep anything that could be suspected of being jazz-like out of his repertory, along with some rather wonderful music like that of Barrios that was tainted with "folk" qualities beyond what Segovia was willing to permit himself. There really was enough of a difference in style, half a century and more ago, between jazz and classical playing that classical musicians noticed the difference in phrasing that someone as brilliant as for instance Laurindo Almeida brought to classical playing - and they didn't approve of it. A matter of accent arising from "culturalism" if not outright racism. In university music departments, these attitudes are still perpetuated by classical guitar professors who studied with Segovia during his last years, aside from a few interesting bright lights like Michael Chapdelaine (who after he got tenure - ! - stopped being a Segovia clone and started playing pop tune arrangements on a steel string in a Hawaiian shirt.)

    Anyway, those issues may be irrelevant to you - maybe you grew up in an environment where there were no such conflicts. In any case, I would like to say that I have outgrown them, but I discover that there is still a discussion to be had about it when the subject comes up. With regard to my own ongoing musical explorations, I'm still learning new tricks, too, and have passed some interesting afternoons reading through the various questions and answers about jazz harmony here on this site. Where the discussions give examples from You-Tube it's particularly enlightening.

  49. #48

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    A complete diverision of the current direction of this topic.

    A lot of what has been said before has been the comparison of classical vs. Jazz piano. (i.e. Oscar Peterson). Having studied piano for quite sometime before I picked up a guitar (lets face it, guitars are way cooler). Piano technique is pretty much universal. Whether you are playing classical, jazz, popular music, whatever, the basic techniques are the same. Scale fingerings. Chord structures. Ect.

    I would even go so far as saying that classical pianists who have played Listz, DeBussy, and even as far as late Beethoven have some sort of idea of modern jazz harmonic structure. As such, studying classical piano and jazz piano are pretty much the same thing. I am sure that someone like Martha Aggerich (crazy classical piano lady, her Rach 3 is the bar at which most are compared against.), could improvise a jazz solo that would blow your mind. This is why its not strange to see some one like Kieth Jarret release a stunning verisions of the Bach pieces such as the Preludes and Fugues and astounding trio music in the same year. A Canadian pianist, David Braid assimilates the two styles in is improvizations all the time.

    Comparing the same for guitar on the other hand, as some one has said already, is like comparing apples vs. oranges. The techinques are completly different. The fact the guitar has two equally important purposes in jazz might be one of the most significant differences. Enough for me to say that the crossover between styles (classical vs. Jazz) is not so much the difference, it has more to do with instrument.

  50. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by One Up,One Down View Post
    I've been playing classical guitar for a couple years now and am currently studying it in college.

    I was wondering about everyone's opinion on how the knowledge of classical might translate into jazz.

    I'm debating transferring into a jazz program; but I see so many people who have learned jazz on their own. (All my jazz progress has been on my own so far)

    Has anyone here studied jazz in college?

    I can't decide whether to continue my classical studies and keep jazz on my own or to study jazz and have a classical background.

    Any experiences?
    I never played a classical piece of music, but I can play chord melody for 'dont know why' by norah jones. I also had a chord melody arrangement for 'desafinado' from antonio carlos jobim, wich I mutated to a accompainment rithm to have someone singing. But I read sheet music very slowly and I dont know much about classical music and never played stuff like that. only when I was like 17 I was grabbing malmsteen stuff but I was such a noob back then... until the 18 I only listened to metal XD now after 3years, I take more or less 2days to make an arrangement, play it and memorize it, of an averange jazz song in 'fingerstile guitar' or 'chord melody' but doesnt matter how hard I try I cant learn any classical piece, because I dont like them that much I like jazz :P if you realy like something, it will be a lot easier for you m8

  51. #50

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    I just thought of a couple more points.

    1. There is quite a difference between "classical" music for the guitar and playing in classic technique. We refer to classical guitar to encompass everything from Rennaisance lute music to modern "serious" music. I don't believe anyone can say they don't like classical music unless they're referring to music between approximately 1750- 18?? There is almost no similarity between Robert de Visee and Paul Hindemith EXCEPT that we play them both on a nylon string guitar w/fingernails!

    2. I was also trained first on nylon w/classical teacher and standard repertoire. The advantage for me was lots of sight reading and good right and left hand technique. Now that I am into jazz I have a lot of STYLE to learn but have good TECHNIQUE and reading ability.

    Sailor