Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456
Posts 126 to 139 of 139
  1. #126

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by spassbeisaite
    If you love Galbraith's book on the Bach Inventions, take a look at the work of Michael Schmolke:

    Bach-Inventionen fur Gitarre | Start

    This is not only about getting the pieces right on the guitar. It is also about understanding the compositions, especially from the perspective of the jazz guitarist. What scales and progressions are the pieces based on? How do you approach improvising over an invention?

    In contrast to the Galbraith edition, the keys here are chosen so that all pieces can be played in standard tuning.
    The scores also include fingerings and tablature.
    For each invention a harmonic analysis is offered, which can be traced in the form of a newly composed third guitar part. This third voice can also be used as a playback for own improvisations on harmonies and form of the Invention.

    Check it out!

    Thanks for the tip on this. I've been working through Galbraith's book, helped by the COVID lockdown earlier this year. I'm trying to memorize all the Guitar 2 parts in the book as I find they hold up very well as solo guitar pieces, and I now have 4 of the inventions memorized. Looks like Book 2 would be a good continuation of these studies.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #127

    User Info Menu

    This is almost becoming standard concert rep


  4. #128

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by BWV
    This is almost becoming standard concert rep

    About that piece I personally doubt that it is Bach at all (even probably not his contempopary- for me it sounds more like later falsification)

  5. #129

    User Info Menu

    Incredible playing, but for me the piece does not really work for guitar. Not being a purist; in fact, I prefer the Stokowski transcription to the original organ version. The piece needs more low end than you can get out of a guitar.

  6. #130

    User Info Menu

    Sometimes things are just for the hell of it?

  7. #131
    This the best music story I know. A musicologist was examining some original Bach manuscripts and kept noting some enharmonic notes that Bach would not normally write. At first he could not figure it out but he noticed he was only reading one page at a time. when he grouped the original manuscripts with several pages out at the same time on a large table the enharmonic notes formed the visual image of a Cross!!! Bach is the man who said The Greatest Use Of Music Is To Glorify God!!!

  8. #132

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by steve burchfield
    This the best music story I know. A musicologist was examining some original Bach manuscripts and kept noting some enharmonic notes that Bach would not normally write. At first he could not figure it out but he noticed he was only reading one page at a time. when he grouped the original manuscripts with several pages out at the same time on a large table the enharmonic notes formed the visual image of a Cross!!! Bach is the man who said The Greatest Use Of Music Is To Glorify God!!!
    I almost live in Bachs music (not guitar or lute only) but I never heard this story...
    Although it sounds quite realistic... do you by any chance know the piece of music it was about?


    PS
    Bruckner was also the guy wo could write on the score "For Dear God" and whe you listen ou really understand that it is a true devotion

  9. #133

    User Info Menu

    I think Heinrich Biber’s Rosary Sonatas have musical crosses written into them. And the violin uses ‘crossed’ tuning?

  10. #134

    User Info Menu

    It is a fact that St Matthew‘s Passion has a growing number of crosses as the action proceeds towards the crucifixion.


    Gesendet von iPhone mit Tapatalk

  11. #135
    [QUOTE=Jonah;1085287]I almost live in Bachs music (not guitar or lute only) but I never heard this story...
    Although it sounds quite realistic... do you by any chance know the piece of music it was about?
    This story was told to me by a professor of counterpoint at Berklee College of Music in the mid seventies I do not not remember his name or which particular piece of music it was. Reading biographies of J.S. Bach is certainly more inspiring than those of pop musicians,although in his day no one knew he would become quite famous. To me he is the Greatest Musician Who Ever Lived!!!

  12. #136

    User Info Menu

    there were 'conventional figures' like 'cross motive' often recognizable by the audience - essentially it is appogiatura ( B-A-C-H is a cross motiv in a very dense chromatic form) and others...

    But what is essential in Bach for me (as well as later in Mozart) that he created extremely complex language which is a combination of conventional idioms: like different fixed motives (assending of descenting), chromatis,, mentioned 'cross motive' and many others, genre references (extemely important and often underestimated elkement of language), direct contextual references as recognizebale quotes from chorals or other works, the allusions to his own choral work in his instrumental work ...
    and all that is involved into purely MUSICAL language where key changes, modulations, rythm and harmonic shifts, motivic interactions, texture and colour of instruments - above all harmonic movement represented through it all - creates very complex and vivd structure of meanings that creates in turn a convincing feel of truth and reality.
    If you wan to become a Christian and you are musically and artistically sensitive there is nothing more convincing than music of Bach - it will make you believe in reality of it more than anything else.

    Form me music is not an abstract beauty - it is the beauty of the meanings...

    Earlier I used to read books... there was Schweitzer, there was an outstanding Boleslav Yavorsky - Russian muscologist who was one of the first to offer 'decipher' the meanings of Bachs works... and who even made a quite particular Evandelistic references to many of Bach work (with arguments and explanation). He did not make books and his works were published many years later after his death wit hthe help of his students' records.

    Some 20 years ago there was also a book byt a late Kedryashev 'Theory of Musical Contents" that covered many of the topics discussed above.

    there was a huge topic of my dear friend Boris Yoffe (probably greatest living composer) - covered with a bunch of articles and dicussions as 'Musical semantics' and finally a brilliant book on Bach - not pubished - ABCH... (actually I saw no other book that had so much connection between the meanings and msuic itself without going into scientific theorysization/objectivity - without any references to other books (that he never read) just you and the score and the music and the great language of it.

    Nevertheless it is still almost impossible to talk with musicians about meanings of music... it causes often superficial arguments that music has no meaning, that it is pure beauty, that we should not talk about music...

    And the quantity of nmeaningless performances grows and grows and - to be honest the further we are the worse it looks to me

  13. #137

    User Info Menu

    A different take on this.


    John
    johnhallguitar.com

  14. #138

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by johnhall
    A different take on this.


    John
    johnhallguitar.com
    I really like this approach. It made me think of this (in terms of being a completely different take on Bach):



    I also love the low-key playing of Bach in the above vid with the family background noise.

  15. #139

    User Info Menu

    Have come to the opinion that playing straight 8ths in Bach should be an exception, not the rule