The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
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  1. #101

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    It is a fact that St Matthew‘s Passion has a growing number of crosses as the action proceeds towards the crucifixion.


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  3. #102

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    there were 'conventional figures' like 'cross motive' often recognizable by the audience - essentially it is appogiatura ( B-A-C-H is a cross motiv in a very dense chromatic form) and others...

    But what is essential in Bach for me (as well as later in Mozart) that he created extremely complex language which is a combination of conventional idioms: like different fixed motives (assending of descenting), chromatis,, mentioned 'cross motive' and many others, genre references (extemely important and often underestimated elkement of language), direct contextual references as recognizebale quotes from chorals or other works, the allusions to his own choral work in his instrumental work ...
    and all that is involved into purely MUSICAL language where key changes, modulations, rythm and harmonic shifts, motivic interactions, texture and colour of instruments - above all harmonic movement represented through it all - creates very complex and vivd structure of meanings that creates in turn a convincing feel of truth and reality.
    If you wan to become a Christian and you are musically and artistically sensitive there is nothing more convincing than music of Bach - it will make you believe in reality of it more than anything else.

    Form me music is not an abstract beauty - it is the beauty of the meanings...

    Earlier I used to read books... there was Schweitzer, there was an outstanding Boleslav Yavorsky - Russian muscologist who was one of the first to offer 'decipher' the meanings of Bachs works... and who even made a quite particular Evandelistic references to many of Bach work (with arguments and explanation). He did not make books and his works were published many years later after his death wit hthe help of his students' records.

    Some 20 years ago there was also a book byt a late Kedryashev 'Theory of Musical Contents" that covered many of the topics discussed above.

    there was a huge topic of my dear friend Boris Yoffe (probably greatest living composer) - covered with a bunch of articles and dicussions as 'Musical semantics' and finally a brilliant book on Bach - not pubished - ABCH... (actually I saw no other book that had so much connection between the meanings and msuic itself without going into scientific theorysization/objectivity - without any references to other books (that he never read) just you and the score and the music and the great language of it.

    Nevertheless it is still almost impossible to talk with musicians about meanings of music... it causes often superficial arguments that music has no meaning, that it is pure beauty, that we should not talk about music...

    And the quantity of nmeaningless performances grows and grows and - to be honest the further we are the worse it looks to me

  4. #103

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    A different take on this.


    John
    johnhallguitar.com

  5. #104

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnhall View Post
    A different take on this.


    John
    johnhallguitar.com
    I really like this approach. It made me think of this (in terms of being a completely different take on Bach):



    I also love the low-key playing of Bach in the above vid with the family background noise.

  6. #105

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    Have come to the opinion that playing straight 8ths in Bach should be an exception, not the rule


  7. #106

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    There are a few problems with this - the main one being the slightly staccato/clipped phrasing at the beginning, oddly enough this is the easiest part, but for some reason I just tend to slip into that kind of phrasing, although not so much when the A section repeats.

    I really love this suite and spend hours every day practising it.
    Last edited by James W; 06-29-2022 at 05:12 PM.

  8. #107

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    Well done, that fugue is a bit of a monster to get through in one pass! I have hacked my way through it a few times but that’s all.

    Sure you had some hesitations on some of the awkward position changes, and I think the voices should overlap more smoothly at the beginning (as you said), but it’s really a good effort, I’m impressed.

    Funnily enough I had a bit of a classical guitar workout today and I played the prelude and allegro (not very fast!) from 998. Skipped the fugue though! Maybe I’ll have a go at it tomorrow.

  9. #108

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    Well done, that fugue is a bit of a monster to get through in one pass! I have hacked my way through it a few times but that’s all.

    Sure you had some hesitations on some of the awkward position changes, and I think the voices should overlap more smoothly at the beginning (as you said), but it’s really a good effort, I’m impressed.

    Funnily enough I had a bit of a classical guitar workout today and I played the prelude and allegro (not very fast!) from 998. Skipped the fugue though! Maybe I’ll have a go at it tomorrow.
    Thanks! Yeah, the fugue does need stamina, and I definitely need a solid few more months chipping away at it (years if I want it to be really good).

    Although the music is difficult, at the same time it still sounds nice even if you're just reading through it, I find. I can't yet play the allegro fast, about quaver = 120 but this young girl plays it at around quaver = 140 and still sounds good, so I'm not too far off!


  10. #109

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    I had my first lesson with a new teacher on Saturday. My right-hand technique needs some basic attention to improve finger independence and divest myself of extraneous movement. I need (I'm told) to search for a right-hand position that allows a straight line from the arm to the pinky on the right-hand side of the hand to enable blood-flow between the wrist and the fingers. In the above video you can see I haven't yet managed to adjust to all of these suggestions; and while not perfect, I still think I can play it better than I could do some time ago. But I am going to keep trying to implement my teacher's instructions regarding the right hand.