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  1. #1

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    I first got the bug for his playing when I got a CD of Bach partitas and sonatas. Just today by chance I happened to hit upon a video of him playing a Mozart sonata. Beautiful music and tone. An eight string classical.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Don't miss the CD of Ravel and Debussy, it's crazy good. He's breaking new ground in so many ways.

  4. #3

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    My teacher made a bunch of us go see him when he played at a guitar fest a few years ago. He wound up playing in a small church in Wicker Park, off of North Avenue, to a sparse crowd (mainly, my teacher's guitar students).

    I couldn't find the venue, so I popped in to Reckless Records on Milwaukee Avenue. I asked the clerk behind the counter for the location, but he had no idea who he was (naturally). As it turned out, the clerk was also Scottish, and reprimanded me for butchering his name--I was pronouncing it like he was, you know, Barry's relative or something.

    The thing about his set up is that he holds the guitar like a cello, and his instrument has an endpin that is set upon this sound box.

    Ergonomically, he kind of holds the guitar like Steve Herberman or John Stowell, but more like a cello player. Also, the 8th string is on the treble side, allowing for easier access to additional melody notes while remaining in position.

    I talked to him afterwards, albeit briefly: he said that we would notice the soundbox if it wasn't there. It contributes to the richness of his tone.


    My teacher said if he was starting over again, he would think about the way he is playing the instrument, in terms of physically playing the instrument like a cello. But he wasn't sure to what extent it would work for jazz guitar.

    I got all a bunch of his CDs, I love the way they are recorded, live, with the rich reverb of the hall. You can even hear him breathe.
    Navdeep Singh.

  5. #4

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    He played in my town for an audience that was more than 90% seniors. He refused to use amplification, and most of the audience had difficulty hearing him. There was a lady in front of me who appeared to have dementia. She kept telling her companion, in a very loud voice, "I can't hear him!"

    He played beautifully, but it was kind of a fiasco.

  6. #5

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    Jonzo, I can imagine a Far Side single panel...

  7. #6

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  8. #7

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    To me he's also a reminder of how each guitar "genre" has its technique/equipment/repertoire rules, and players who step outside one or more of those expectations are often not really "heard"...

    For a longish time I was the managing director of a (primarily classical) guitar society. I was for some of that time the token non-classical person at the table. The classical players/teachers on our board of directors looked at/heard Galbraith with nothing but disdain. The issue for them was his vertical guitar position and radically altered right-hand technique. No one in that group thought his tone was good. I've only heard limited examples of his playing myself, and never in person. I would have to say that the playing I heard was not as rich or moving (to me) as that of such established masters as David Russell, or younger players such Irina Kulikova. But I have my biases about jazz guitar tone and technique, too.

  9. #8

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    Galbraith is a deep and masterful musician, and careful listening to him in both live and recorded formats will bring that home. His dynamic and tone color ranges are enormous, and his right-hand technique is efficient and beautiful. The classical guitar world is full of snobs and musical conservatives, none of whom understands that art is subjective. In a
    blindfold" test, Galbraith stands out as a master.

  10. #9

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    Completely agree.

    Quote Originally Posted by ronjazz View Post
    Galbraith is a deep and masterful musician, and careful listening to him in both live and recorded formats will bring that home. His dynamic and tone color ranges are enormous, and his right-hand technique is efficient and beautiful. The classical guitar world is full of snobs and musical conservatives, none of whom understands that art is subjective. In a
    blindfold" test, Galbraith stands out as a master.
    What can this strange device be?

    My father's final words were... Get 'em out by Friday.

  11. #10

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    When I was president of the guitar ensemble at West Chester University, I organized a trip to Franklin & College to see Mr. Galbraith. He was marvelous.

    That concert was marred by an elderly man who was snoring. I wish I could find the review, because it called out the guy (something to the effect of "...and to the guy in the front row who couldn't stay awake, next time, stay home!).

    Another issue is that our group had ordered group tickets in advance, and yet were stuck in the very back row. He still sounded great.
    What can this strange device be?

    My father's final words were... Get 'em out by Friday.