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  1. #1

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    Check out this instrument and the man playing this piece by de Visee.


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Quite a player and quite an instrument!! What is it "theorbo", is that the name of the instrument or the composition? Looks like a Laud with a really long neck?
    Attached Images Attached Images music I used to play -Robert de Visee-wow-gif 

  4. #3

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    Hey fathand, theorbo is the name of the instrument. It's like a lute with extra long, harp-like bass strings on the bottom. Awesome vid, thanks

  5. #4

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    I would never like to be the guy in the ensemble who sits to the left of the theorbo player.

  6. #5

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    I had a go on a theorbo.... Big old scale length, but the tuning is reasonably accessible for guitarists...

    That reminds me I must play the (renaissance) lute a bit more...

    What I really want is a baroque guitar...

  7. #6

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    I love all those Renaissance and baroque string instruments. I have a great CD by Jakob Lindberg where he plays 2 pieces on the chitarrone by Kapsberger, called 'Arpeggiata' and 'Colascione'. They sound quite modern in places.

    Here's a version of Colascione by Paul O'Dette. I love those power chords!


  8. #7

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    I cannot condone cruelty to animals.

    music I used to play -Robert de Visee-f408b787e376dc79915e6addb2d1a56e5da5f7c655c5f503943a1dd3d41e9bbf-jpg
    Last edited by christianm77; 02-24-2016 at 08:25 AM.

  9. #8

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    How do you even get that thing out of the house? Holy crap. And I thought drudging along a 40lbs amp was a b**ch.
    Seeking beauty and truth through six strings.

  10. #9

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    Here's me playing a theorbo six years ago:




    As the Renaissance gave way to the baroque periods, some dudes in the Catholic Church decided it would be better to have one melody line supported by a bass line, with chord notes in between, as opposed to polyphonic music with overlapping lines - spaghetti.

    So, the lute players needed to develop their bass register, and that meant longer strings, because, in the days of plain gut strings, the lower notes required thicker and thicker strings, and they became less and less musical unless they were lengthened. The longer the string, the thinner it could be. The theorbo was born...

    The first two strings are down an octave, the third string now the highest note. The instrument was created to give support to singers. The player would play the bass line as written, and improvise chords and runs on top, in counterpoint to the singer. I cut my teeth with it by playing Monteverdi operas. As such, I was less interested in the solo repertoire for it, but I did play some.

    So, that was about 1580 to 1640, and Italian. Robert de Visee was of the next generation, roughly speaking, and in France. The Italian composer, Lully, had revolutionised music at the French court, and Italian fashions were mixed with French taste for ornament. Theorboes were introduced, and loved. One opera is reported to have had thirty of these beasts!

    BUT, the French also created a smaller "theorbe des pièces" for solo music. They did not play solo music on the big theorbo. It should not sound as big and as grand as Jonas makes it sound. But he's a fine player, for sure.

    I sold my theorbo soon after making that video. I preferred using it for early baroque operas, rather than playing solo pieces.

  11. #10

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    That was excellent Rob.

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    Here's me playing a theorbo six years ago:




    As the Renaissance gave way to the baroque periods, some dudes in the Catholic Church decided it would be better to have one melody line supported by a bass line, with chord notes in between, as opposed to polyphonic music with overlapping lines - spaghetti.

    So, the lute players needed to develop their bass register, and that meant longer strings, because, in the days of plain gut strings, the lower notes required thicker and thicker strings, and they became less and less musical unless they were lengthened. The longer the string, the thinner it could be. The theorbo was born...

    The first two strings are down an octave, the third string now the highest note. The instrument was created to give support to singers. The player would play the bass line as written, and improvise chords and runs on top, in counterpoint to the singer. I cut my teeth with it by playing Monteverdi operas. As such, I was less interested in the solo repertoire for it, but I did play some.

    So, that was about 1580 to 1640, and Italian. Robert de Visee was of the next generation, roughly speaking, and in France. The Italian composer, Lully, had revolutionised music at the French court, and Italian fashions were mixed with French taste for ornament. Theorboes were introduced, and loved. One opera is reported to have had thirty of these beasts!

    BUT, the French also created a smaller "theorbe des pièces" for solo music. They did not play solo music on the big theorbo. It should not sound as big and as grand as Jonas makes it sound. But he's a fine player, for sure.

    I sold my theorbo soon after making that video. I preferred using it for early baroque operas, rather than playing solo pieces.
    Thanks Rob - dreamy, hypnotic piece - that b7 in the bass is interesting... Beautiful playing...

  13. #12

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  14. #13

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    hey rob what looper pedal did you you use in that video??? haha

    great info, outdone only by your great performance

    wonderful stuff

    cheers

  15. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    Here's me playing a theorbo six years ago:
    By coincidence, your Soundcloud account popped up while listening to something else yesterday. You are a beast, Rob.... In a good way. ;-) and prolific at that.

  16. #15

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    Ha. The Beast with the looper. I've been called worse Cheers, folks.

  17. #16
    Hahah . I don't know if any of it is lost in meaning, crossing the Atlantic, but I have three teenagers at home. A great player might be a monster, a beast , or probably most complementary: just "beast" (used as an adjective). so, Rob, not only are you "a beast" , but you're also "beast". :-)

    Great channel!

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    The Beast with the looper.
    Sounds like some terrifying old Scottish Highland ballad!

  19. #18

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    Excellent music and instrument. Thanks for enlightening me....