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  1. #26

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    I've never been really happy with the amplified sound but it's a necessary evil to play gigs. It's very difficult to get the pure sound of the Classical guitar unless, perhaps, you're an electro-techie . . . which I'm not. Play live . . . Marinero[/QUOTE]

    agree.
    a 70s matsuoka guitar, 70% shure ksm137 mike, 30% kremona pu, plus aer on mike stand, had (? hopefully not) to do it,
    l have given up playing my good instrument amplified
    what did not do it : oktavia ,rode, dpa clip-on-mike with kind of notch around 1st string b, several obscure acoustic amps,...

    be happy,
    woodpecker

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #27

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    mr. mckoy sounds very joao gilberto-like,
    up to that light greenish suit the farmers wore on sundays, after getting rid of their rubber boots, - a trip back in time
    legao.

    woodpecker

  4. #28

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    K&k pickups
    fishman platinum pro eq
    acus 6t

    I also have a pedalboard with looper for practice, composition, ambient improvs

  5. #29

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    The most important aspect of amplifying classical guitar is the preamp, where the astute player with a really good EQ in a preamp can use even a cheap Kremona and get a good sound. Conversely, the hardest classical/flamenco guitars to amplify are the ones that sound the best unamplified. Your best bet is a well-made but inexpensive guitar that is not so resonant as to feed back, like a flamenco, or something with more midrange but not a lot of peaks, like a mid-level Yamaha or Takamine, which only sound "OK" unamplified. Except for custom builds with amplification in mind, the best guitars to amplify in a live setting that may vary from night to night and may have lots of background noise is around $1000-1500. That will get a well-finished and well-constructed guitar, machine made, which will be much easier to tame when the electrons start flowing. I've been at this since the Crimean War, even spent a day with Earl Klugh many years ago experimenting with coal-fired amplification (as opposed to billions of ones and zeroes going by). For non-concert work such as clubs and outdoor festivals, I have used guitars that I bought for as little as $600 and installed an RCM system, took that system through 4 guitars, now using it in a modified flamenco 7-string, $1300, handmade, but not good enough for live stage work unamplified (those are starting at $4000). A spectacular sound with a good system (Bose for me), and still a pleasure to play. Woodpecker knows.

  6. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by ronjazz
    The most important aspect of amplifying classical guitar is the preamp, where the astute player with a really good EQ in a preamp can use even a cheap Kremona and get a good sound. Conversely, the hardest classical/flamenco guitars to amplify are the ones that sound the best unamplified. Your best bet is a well-made but inexpensive guitar that is not so resonant as to feed back, like a flamenco, or something with more midrange but not a lot of peaks, like a mid-level Yamaha or Takamine, which only sound "OK" unamplified. Except for custom builds with amplification in mind, the best guitars to amplify in a live setting that may vary from night to night and may have lots of background noise is around $1000-1500. That will get a well-finished and well-constructed guitar, machine made, which will be much easier to tame when the electrons start flowing. I've been at this since the Crimean War, even spent a day with Earl Klugh many years ago experimenting with coal-fired amplification (as opposed to billions of ones and zeroes going by). For non-concert work such as clubs and outdoor festivals, I have used guitars that I bought for as little as $600 and installed an RCM system, took that system through 4 guitars, now using it in a modified flamenco 7-string, $1300, handmade, but not good enough for live stage work unamplified (those are starting at $4000). A spectacular sound with a good system (Bose for me), and still a pleasure to play. Woodpecker knows.
    THIS

    My handmade classical guitar is tough to manage when amplified because, although beautiful in tone unplugged, it is so sensitive and unforgiving.

    I can’t really play it amplified without my Fishman Platinum preamp because the preamp offers a notch filter, para mid eq, and high pass filter. And even then only at lowish volumes with a sound hole plug.

    The next guitar I build / buy will be designed specifically for the purpose of amplification, especially a thicker / heavier soundboard and bridge, coupled with stiffer bracing.

  7. #31
    For me a Tak 132 mid level guitar with a Fishman loud box with a touch of reverb is decent wo breakin the bank. Not my main area of guitar but good for some gigs.