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  1. #1

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    Deer Lick galaxy group,from my backyard observatory

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    You must have quite the setup in your backyard. I am a 4th year astrophysics student.

  4. #3

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    Heh I did astronomy at uni years ago... a few of us around I see. Nice deep sky photography; didn’t yet get a chance to listen...

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Heh I did astronomy at uni years ago... a few of us around I see. Nice deep sky photography; didn’t yet get a chance to listen...
    Did you take a couple of astro classes, or were you a physics/astro major?

  6. #5
    You must have quite the setup in your backyard. I am a 4th year astrophysics student.eh 6794-2.0
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    setup
    scope :Takahashi FS128
    Mount :Takahashi EM 200
    CCD : SBIG ST10
    Last edited by emilP; 01-03-2021 at 08:49 AM.

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by eh6794-2.0
    Did you take a couple of astro classes, or were you a physics/astro major?
    We don’t do major/minor here in UK. I was all Astronomy for 4 years.

    (well if you ignore all the time I spent on doing music that I should have probably spent on my assignments haha)

    I did a final year project on a Classical Nova using HST data for high time resolution spectroscopy....

    I used to know what that means

  8. #7

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    But in all seriousness Astronomy has moved on incredibly in 20 years, my textbooks and lectures in things like cosmology are all obsolete.

    Exciting time to be part of the field! Do you think you’ll carry on with it?

  9. #8
    I wish you to see some beautiful objects in 2021 ,gentlemen !


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  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    But in all seriousness Astronomy has moved on incredibly in 20 years, my textbooks and lectures in things like cosmology are all obsolete.

    Exciting time to be part of the field! Do you think you’ll carry on with it?
    I am 45 years old. I'm semi-retired from my previous business. It took me a bit long to get to my final year (I can graduate one year from today, but I may stay until the end of the academic year to get a math minor).

    In America, we go straight to a PhD program and skip the Masters. Last quarter I blew it and got two C's in Mechanics and Thermo, so I don't know if I can get into a decent grad school with those low grades. Even if I can get into a decent grad school, I don't know if I want to go another 6 years. Also, it's hard to get into grad school if you don't have research experience, and I have none.

    I'm taking a really cool Cosmology class this quarter. I'm going to try to impress the professor and get a research position. If I get perfect grades and a research position, maybe grad school will be an option. I don't have to decide until next year (I think grad school applications go out around January).

    Having said that, I have ALWAYS wanted to be a physicist and you can't do that if you don't have a PhD. So I dunno. Also, as you said, it's an exciting time. You are right. There are a lot of new telescopes (in orbit and on the ground) coming online in the next few years. We will begin to really push the science with the data we acquire.

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by emilP
    You must have quite the setup in your backyard. I am a 4th year astrophysics student.eh 6794-2.0
    Stella by Starlight-takahassi-mount-ans-scope-jpg


    setup
    scope :Takahashi FS128
    Mount :Takahashi EM 200
    CCD : SBIG ST10
    Very cool. It's funny, many astro students have never used a telescope. My first telescope use will be in the Spring for a class where we use the school's.

  12. #11

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    I ground a 10" mirror, f6.8, under Sidewalk Astronomy creator John Dobson a number of years back, about 1992 or so.

    And built the Dobsonian mount for it also. Hell of a piece of glass, at altitude and clear air some great views. For a ten, it does amazing dim fuzzies (nebulae and most galaxies tend to be very faint, hence the moniker).

    But you don't do astro photography with that setup. Sigh.

    Nice image and backyard setup.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  13. #12
    Stella by Starlight-c6ef5ce3-0f5f-47c1-a605-ec9a439765c0-jpeg

    Astrophotography of Andromeda ,Céroux September 2020
    L:30X5m
    R=Bl=G :10x 5m

  14. #13

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    My alma mater has access to a observatory with lots of good size Victorian telescopes; the only problem being that in the interim someone built what Americans would call a ‘freeway’ next to it. Ah well. Astronomy is not a pursuit for cities, which is where the jazz is. (Well of course if you are a pro you fly out to Chile or whatever. Or operate space telescopes remotely... )

    One enduring memory was almost freezing my eye to the eyepiece making sure the guide star remained centred because the guidance motors on the telescope were not the best. I was taking a spectrum of M42; you know, here are the Hydrogen emission lines, that kind of thing.

    So I did look through a telescope for my degree! But yeah....

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by emilP
    Stella by Starlight-c6ef5ce3-0f5f-47c1-a605-ec9a439765c0-jpeg

    Astrophotography of Andromeda ,Céroux September 2020
    L:30X5m
    R=Bl=G :10x 5m
    Good dust lane bro

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by eh6794-2.0
    I am 45 years old. I'm semi-retired from my previous business. It took me a bit long to get to my final year (I can graduate one year from today, but I may stay until the end of the academic year to get a math minor).

    In America, we go straight to a PhD program and skip the Masters. Last quarter I blew it and got two C's in Mechanics and Thermo, so I don't know if I can get into a decent grad school with those low grades. Even if I can get into a decent grad school, I don't know if I want to go another 6 years. Also, it's hard to get into grad school if you don't have research experience, and I have none.

    I'm taking a really cool Cosmology class this quarter. I'm going to try to impress the professor and get a research position. If I get perfect grades and a research position, maybe grad school will be an option. I don't have to decide until next year (I think grad school applications go out around January).

    Having said that, I have ALWAYS wanted to be a physicist and you can't do that if you don't have a PhD. So I dunno. Also, as you said, it's an exciting time. You are right. There are a lot of new telescopes (in orbit and on the ground) coming online in the next few years. We will begin to really push the science with the data we acquire.
    Oh, best of luck!

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by emilP
    Stella by Starlight-c6ef5ce3-0f5f-47c1-a605-ec9a439765c0-jpeg

    Astrophotography of Andromeda ,Céroux September 2020
    L:30X5m
    R=Bl=G :10x 5m
    Wow, that's quite a photo.

    John

  18. #17

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    dr. brian may of queen probably being the best known pro guitarist astro physicist!!...though ray davies (kinks) and wilko johnson are both longtime astronomy enthusiasts



    cheers
    Last edited by neatomic; 01-04-2021 at 02:21 PM. Reason: typo-

  19. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    dr. brian may of queen probably being the best known pro guitarist astro physicist!!...though ray davies (kinks) and wilko johnson are both longtime astronomy enthusiasts



    cheers
    I am also dr...but not in Astronomy, in Endocrinology and Nuclear Medecine
    ;-)

  20. #19
    Christian
    you’ll notice that I played Dbdim7 with a Bb on the top,like discussed on the 2016-03-16

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by emilP
    Christian
    you’ll notice that I played Dbdim7 with a Bb on the top,like discussed on the 2016-03-16
    splendid.

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by emilP
    I am also dr...but not in Astronomy, in Endocrinology and Nuclear Medecine
    ;-)
    yes i remember! seems like a life well led...enjoy

    cheers
    Last edited by neatomic; 01-05-2021 at 07:21 AM. Reason: typo-

  23. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    yes i remember! seems like a life well led...enjoy

    cheers
    every season of life is beautiful
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  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    My alma mater has access to a observatory with lots of good size Victorian telescopes; the only problem being that in the interim someone built what Americans would call a ‘freeway’ next to it. Ah well. Astronomy is not a pursuit for cities, which is where the jazz is. (Well of course if you are a pro you fly out to Chile or whatever. Or operate space telescopes remotely... )

    One enduring memory was almost freezing my eye to the eyepiece making sure the guide star remained centred because the guidance motors on the telescope were not the best. I was taking a spectrum of M42; you know, here are the Hydrogen emission lines, that kind of thing.

    So I did look through a telescope for my degree! But yeah....
    Sadly, I may never look through a professional/science telescope. I just found out that I won't take the advanced lab next quarter (using the school's observatory). That means my advanced lab will probably be a particle physics lab, which is still fine.

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by eh6794-2.0
    Sadly, I may never look through a professional/science telescope. I just found out that I won't take the advanced lab next quarter (using the school's observatory). That means my advanced lab will probably be a particle physics lab, which is still fine.
    Well, professional telescopes are not generally looked through. You might look through the finder scope (but not in a state of the art observatory where it's all computers.) So from the operator end, may not be that different an experience haha.

    An amateur dobsonian light bucket with a big deep field eyepiece and a fat globular cluster is as good as it gets in my view... EmilP's got a pretty mega set up if you ask me.

  26. #25

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    Stopped by the visitors center for the Mauna Kea Observatory, 9000 feet up the mountain. Was fascinating. Didn't go to the top where the scopes are set in their various buildings, because you need a low-gear manual transmission or you burn your brakes out coming back down 4,000 feet of thin air and steep windy gravel road.

    But no astronomers normally go up there anyway. Even back in 1996, they worked in a building on the NW side of the island at seaside. All imagery was digital data, ported directly to their computers.

    From all 13 different scope facilities.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk