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  1. #1

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    We are all grateful, I'm sure, for the casual home videos and live events being produced by artists and shared on Youtube, Facebook, Vimeo, etc. I think I have a backlog of things to watch... I can hardly keep up! Good problem to have.

    With the permission of the artist, I'm posting my transcription of the verse and first solo chorus of Stompin' at the Savoy by Chris Whiteman. The rhythmic notation on some block chords has been left out. That is, I may have simply written half or whole note chords - check out the video to get the rhythmic pattern Chris uses.

    PDF attached below. I used Guitar Pro 6 to make the file, so if anyone wants the .gpx for additional editing just let me know.

    Extra credit if you spot one of the Barry Harris 54321 licks in the solo!


    Here's what I hear:



    Here's what it really sounds like:

    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Michael Neverisky; 04-13-2020 at 05:35 AM.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Hi Michael, you have nailed the solo IMHO, I also worked on this tune ( Chris arrangement as well ), but the solo I still need to figure out....intro I steal from Jonathan Stout i think...

    Last edited by DjangoBG; 04-13-2020 at 08:43 AM.

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by DjangoBG
    ....intro I steal from Jonathan Stout i think...
    ... and I'll steal if from you! Nicely done.

  5. #4

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    Nice work, Michael! Love the sound of your Tele.
    Thanks for the pdf.

  6. #5

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    Chris doesn't blow his horn enough so to speak but like many full time musicians his gig money has hit the skids. If you would like to support him, please purchase his arrangements via his website or support him on Patreon. I'm not affiliated with Chris, just a happy customer.


    Christopher Whiteman is creating Jazz Guitar Performance Videos and Instructional Material | Patreon
    Last edited by rob taft; 04-14-2020 at 09:01 PM.

  7. #6

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    Chris Whiteman is a very valuable resource for learning jazz guitar, and a valuable resource for anyone working on the repertoire. Very tasteful solos and chord melodies. I really enjoy his videos, and agree with Rob Taft about supporting him.

    But I don't understand why he plays the melody to Stompin' at the Savoy wrong, every time. The song can be thought of as kind of a call and answer:

    The call: "Sa-voy!"
    The answer: "The home of sweet ro-mance."
    Call: "Sa-voy!"
    answer: "It wins you at a glance."
    Call: "Sa-voy!"
    Answer: "Gives hap-py feet a chance... To dance!"

    All three calls are always exactly the same melody, the second note a minor third up from the first. In the key of Db, that would be F-A. I have no idea why Chris goes down to the tonic (F-D) when it comes around the second time. Any ideas?

  8. #7

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    Artistic license?

  9. #8

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    Chris Whiteman: Stompin' at the Savoy-simpson-jpg

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ukena
    Chris Whiteman is a very valuable resource for learning jazz guitar, and a valuable resource for anyone working on the repertoire. Very tasteful solos and chord melodies. I really enjoy his videos, and agree with Rob Taft about supporting him.

    But I don't understand why he plays the melody to Stompin' at the Savoy wrong, every time. The song can be thought of as kind of a call and answer:

    The call: "Sa-voy!"
    The answer: "The home of sweet ro-mance."
    Call: "Sa-voy!"
    answer: "It wins you at a glance."
    Call: "Sa-voy!"
    Answer: "Gives hap-py feet a chance... To dance!"

    All three calls are always exactly the same melody, the second note a minor third up from the first. In the key of Db, that would be F-A. I have no idea why Chris goes down to the tonic (F-D) when it comes around the second time. Any ideas?
    You are correct. That is not the original melody, but I heard Bucky Pizzarelli play the melody statement like that at a concert many years ago and I thought it sounded cool. Aesthetically I thought it added a nice balance moving down to the Db. I understand that purists will not be happy. I have no other reason than I liked the way it sounded.

    Thank for listening and all of the kind words.

    Chris

  11. #10

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    Thanks for the explanation, Chris – I suspected that you might have heard a version with that particular melody, and preferred it.

    I actually find your (and Bucky's) version unbalanced, but that's just me. I come to jazz guitar from the experience of a jazz singer, and I find singing the line that way kind of uninteresting. It's not as jarring on the guitar, though; I actually had to listen a few times to make sure I had heard it right.

    And I thoroughly enjoy your performance on this tune, and on the many others on your channel. Thank you for taking the time and putting in the effort to make them available!

  12. #11

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    Great job Michael. Nice playing.

    And Chris Whiteman : it just occurred to me that that I've liked and admired every single arrangement he's ever posted. All of them.

  13. #12

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    With a bit of practice.


  14. #13

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    Very nice ! Good job Michael.

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ukena
    Chris Whiteman is a very valuable resource for learning jazz guitar, and a valuable resource for anyone working on the repertoire. Very tasteful solos and chord melodies. I really enjoy his videos, and agree with Rob Taft about supporting him.

    But I don't understand why he plays the melody to Stompin' at the Savoy wrong, every time. The song can be thought of as kind of a call and answer:

    The call: "Sa-voy!"
    The answer: "The home of sweet ro-mance."
    Call: "Sa-voy!"
    answer: "It wins you at a glance."
    Call: "Sa-voy!"
    Answer: "Gives hap-py feet a chance... To dance!"

    All three calls are always exactly the same melody, the second note a minor third up from the first. In the key of Db, that would be F-A. I have no idea why Chris goes down to the tonic (F-D) when it comes around the second time. Any ideas?
    FWIW I usually play the first chord (Ab13) as an Ab13b9 with A ? (or more correctly Bbb) in the bass. And the same again on the 2nd 'call'. A bit more flavour - I think I got it from Jim Hall but not sure now