1. #1

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    i am new to jazz playing and want to play chord melody style . when i play the melody line and get to the note which i want to expand /fill out the tune. the note that i finished on. do i look for a nice 7 /major /minor dim chord that complements or sounds the same i e say i finish on a A do i look for a chord in the a family of chords

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Start by learning other people's tunes. Get a Real Book, it's a great resource.

    All "chord melody" really is is playing the chords to a tune and putting the melody note (usually) on top.

    So you're not making it up out of thin air. The tune supplies both melody and harmony, you put them together.

    It's what piano players call "playing the piano."

    Pick a song, we can ho through it together here.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  4. #3

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    Dirk (who hosts this forum) has some great lessons. Scroll down to Autumn Leaves, as that’s a good tune to start off on.
    Free Jazz Guitar Lessons | Learn How To Play Jazz Guitar
    I haven’t looked at this particular lesson, but everything I’ve seen on his site is nicely done. If you find this lesson is over your head, you may need to start with some of his earlier lessons for foundations (basic scales, chords, etc.). Give it a try then post any questions here.
    After you learn a bunch of standards this way you’ll start to understand basic chord changes and how they relate to the melody.

  5. #4

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    Harmonizing the melody of a tune is arrangement of the tune for solo guitar. Harmonic techniques and devices for arranging are fundamentally the same whether you're arranging for a concert band or orchestra or choir or piano or etc etc.
    There is a very thin line that separates playing a solo arrangement and comping with movement. Just like you harmonize a melody by playing chords under it, the reverse is also true. Everytime you play a chord, you're also playing a melody note (the top note). There are also inner voices and the bass line that can move in various ways (contrary, oblique, parallel etc). But let's leave that aside for now.
    Typically the first thing you do is transpose the melody by an octave (or octaves) so it resides on the high E and B strings.
    Common ways to harmonize melody on these strings include:
    - Drop chord inversions of the chord under the melody.
    - Harmonized scales for harmonizing scalar movements.
    - Passing diminished chords.
    - Secondary dominant of the chord of the moment.
    - Quartal harmony.
    - Half note parallel approach chords.
    - Substitutions (functional, tritone or other reharmonization techniques)
    This is not a complete list.

    You can use block chords or rely on the listeners short term musical memory and alternate chords (usually just quick stabs) and short single note lines. Or break chords apart and play individual chord voices. That's called counterpoint.

    Yes this is a lot. But solo guitar arrangement is an advanced subject and an art form. The good news is though, in my experience simple tools like chord inversions and passing chords go a long way.

    There are many books that are collections of jazz standards arranged for solo guitar. I suggest getting one of those books and reverse engineering the devices used as you learn tunes. There are also books that give a good overview of the devices I mentioned above.

  6. #5
    [thanks for the advice QUOTE=mr. beaumont;969579]Start by learning other people's tunes. Get a Real Book, it's a great resource.

    All "chord melody" really is is playing the chords to a tune and putting the melody note (usually) on top.

    So you're not making it up out of thin air. The tune supplies both melody and harmony, you put them together.

    It's what piano players call "playing the piano."

    Pick a song, we can ho through it together here.[/QUOTE]

  7. #6
    thanks to all who replied