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  1. #1

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    Hi everyone, wasn't sure where exactly to post this, please let me know if there's a better place:

    I recently stumbled upon a youtube recording of one piece from a collection of 36, written by Mick Goodrick. Seems like some good educational material...but I couldn't find anyone selling it, or really barely any mention of it. Does anyone know where I might find the scores?

    Thanks!

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    As far as I can tell, that Mick Goodrick collection is not in print at the present time.

    It might have been in the past or maybe it will be in the near future.

    Regards,
    Steven Herron
    Mick Goodrick Tabs - Guitar Solos, Tab Books, Instruction DVDs + Video Lessons

  4. #3

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    I have several, but they were never published as a collection as far as I know. I got them from Mick years ago.

  5. #4

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    In the process of having them put on Finale, then we'll have them self published. Maybe something additional from Mick. This edition will have the corrections of the errors that were printed in the original; they'll be complete as intended. What do you think, bound with a title on the spine or wire bound?

    David

  6. #5

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    I'd say comb bound, with the title on the spine of the comb. Sits on the stand well and doesn't have the drawbacks of spiral bound.

  7. #6

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    How about a PDF version? Might speed the process and it gives the player the option to print/bind per preference or play from an iPad or sim.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by skittles View Post
    How about a PDF version? Might speed the process and it gives the player the option to print/bind per preference or play from an iPad or sim.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Good idea. I'll run that by Mick. I know he didn't want it formatted for Kindle, but PDF, yeah, that might work.
    David

  9. #8

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    I’m interested in any/or both formats!

  10. #9

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    Wow, this all sounds like great news.

    I second PDF availability, and have a marginal preference for spiral, as it sits flat.

    Where / when can we expect to look for the new edition? Thanks!

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by DLQ View Post
    Wow, this all sounds like great news.

    I second PDF availability, and have a marginal preference for spiral, as it sits flat.

    Where / when can we expect to look for the new edition? Thanks!
    I have someone working on putting the pieces in Finale at the moment. There were some corrections and additions that escaped the original first printing so these will be put into the new edition. The book was also printed in a slightly larger format in the original printing and Mick thought it'd be more practical to have it sized to standard 11x8.5". I think I'll have it done with Lulu, and it was kind of surprising that Berklee press didn't want to do it. They think of Mick's stuff as unapproachable and unsellable, and these are not going to be written in TAB. So sorry to the TABbers.
    David

  12. #11

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    Thank you David, looking forward to it

  13. #12

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    A really lovely duo piece from the collection, this one entitled No Turning Back. This will give you an idea of the level of reading for these pieces. The study notes are mine, this is just to give you an idea...
    David

    Mick Goodrick's 36 solo pieces for fingerstyle guitar??-screen-shot-2019-05-21-10-07-38-am-jpgMick Goodrick's 36 solo pieces for fingerstyle guitar??-fullsizerender-jpg

  14. #13

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    > these are not going to be written in TAB.

    I don't know recent versions of Finale, but most notation programs of any complexity will auto-generate tab from notes, although a little editing is generally necessary after the conversion.

    An advantage of including tab is access to a much larger market.

    John R.

  15. #14

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    Except that guitar tab generated by software programs tends to be incorrect. Frankly it's easier to read sheet music than that stuff; I've never understood its popularity, and I don't read sheet music so much as decoded slowly and laboriously. Tab is even worse. Sometimes it can be helpful in demonstrating a particularly obscure fingering to help the reader find playability.

    Not being able to read sheet music – like me - is one of the reasons that guitarists tend to be poor musicians. Virtually every other instrument teaches reading from day one.
    Beauty is as close to terror as we can well endure. -Rainer Maria Rilke

  16. #15

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    No tab....great!

    Going by the example you posted above I'm in. [The harmonic outline you provided would be an assist....what does Mick think?]

    How many of the pieces are solos ?

    I'm all for PDF or spiral bound as a printed book.

    Looking forward to playing through these pieces....Incidentally, there would likely be some cross over to the new
    breed of classical guitarists, who are often looking for new works to play and differentiate themselves from their colleagues.

  17. #16

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    Looks like a great idea! No TAB is just fine, but will there be audio samples available, either online or possible included (or supplementary) CD availability? Thx.

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by jrethorst View Post
    > these are not going to be written in TAB.

    I don't know recent versions of Finale, but most notation programs of any complexity will auto-generate tab from notes, although a little editing is generally necessary after the conversion.

    An advantage of including tab is access to a much larger market.

    John R.
    These are good points, and while a larger market could benefit from instructions on how to perform music ie. where to put your fingers to get the sounds, leaving a player free to interpret not only how, but where to play a phrase can lead to very different performances. In fact, finding out how you would play a piece enhances the experience of being able to hear across the fingerboard.

    Villa Lobos didn't include any interpretive aids in his preludes, some of the most iconic pieces for classical guitar. I learned a ton by not being told where and how to shift to get the most out of my guitar playing those pieces.
    When I got around to working out classical pieces for my 7 string guitar, I picked a Cello Suite by Bach and took it from the original cello manuscripts, not a transciption from someone else. The sparse yet rich lines that embodied the elegance of fight (Cello is not an easy or convenient instrument to play these on, the shifts can be brutal) can played arpegiated so easily by playing across a guitar fingerboard, become lyrically awkward yet beautiful in another way playing up the string. You can't have that experience of interpretation with TAB.

    I was working with the piece I posted about the time I was doing a weekly thing with Mick and I asked him about a version for solo guitar. First he said "No. It's written for two guitars." then he thought for a moment and he said "Play it for me if you manage to do it."

    With anything Mick does, there seems to be a great deal of interpretation and implied musicality that comes from beyond what is given. TAB can show someone where to put their fingers, yes, but it'd rob the player of the added step of recognizing shapes, learning how the shapes can be moved or anchored elsewhere on the fingerboard, and owning the piece yourself. That's a beautiful experience too.

    David

    As an example, the first line of Guitar II in this piece may have been written with a drop 2 first inversion over a bass note in mind, and in first position this works, but that chord structure can be found elsewhere. Who's to say it can only be played in one place, and on one set of strings?

  19. #18

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    One of the earlier posters has made it clear that he doesn't like tab.


    Neither do I, or at least I've never used it. Automatic tab from notation is correct, though, note for note. You may want a note played on another string than where the auto transcription puts it, which is easy enough to edit.


    I also agree that guitarists' ability to read music could sometimes be better. The last post makes the good point that letting the player choose where to play a phrase can have highly positive benefits. A player accomplished enough to make that kind of choice doesn't need tab anyway. Conversely, tab opens the door for a lot of players who like this music and can use it to become more accomplished musicians.


    My only point was that the person taking the time and expense to notate this music, and publish it, may understandably want a much larger market to sell it to. He may not, but my suggestion was only intended to be helpful.

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by jrethorst View Post


    My only point was that the person taking the time and expense to notate this music, and publish it, may understandably want a much larger market to sell it to. He may not, but my suggestion was only intended to be helpful.
    Thanks jrethorst, I get it and I understand. Yeah it's a good idea and helpful, but in the end, I guess it's less about the convenience and more about being able to play with awareness. I know of guitarists who graduated Berklee and can't sight read. And for them, being able to use TAB to know where to put their fingers would be a great boon. I've spoken to Mick about this and though it might be unfair to deprive some players of tunes they can't figure out without TAB, in the end, as a creative improvisor and teacher, he thinks it's a much greater ability to be able to possess a visual to aural facility; understanding through reading is part of a greater prize than being able to play one tune by finger rote.
    Personally, your suggestion is a good one, but until a piece of software can automatically turn a piece of music into individual instructions that cover all sonic and imaginable possibilities of interpretation, TAB is a limiting starting point in learning a piece. Why hasn't anyone written software that lets someone scan in a piece of music, then gives you a series of options on where you can put your fingers, plays them out and lets you know the possibilities so you can own it without needing to read it? There's a fortune to be made there.
    Taken to the extreme, I was talking about how difficult it is to really learn to play the guitar, to play it with awareness and understanding. Mick put it succinctly when he said "Why would anyone go to the trouble of learning such a difficult instrument when you can just buy a CD, put it in a player and have music that's better than you'll ever play it and all you do is hit a PLAY button?"

    Stop and Shop sells more cakes than cake mixes. Duncan Hines sells a whole lot more cake mixes in boxes than do authors who sell books on cooking. There are more cook book bakers than exist bakers who can make their own pancakes from scratch. Convenience is much more lucrative but what is the price of ownership? Ideally, jrethorst, it'd be great for there to exist some form of software wherein you scan in a piece of music and a fingerboard appears on the screen and tells you where and why to put your hands as you hear the music being made. For now, it's the software in your head.
    Good suggestion and good ideas on a provocative subject. Thanks!
    David
    Last edited by TruthHertz; 05-28-2019 at 03:06 AM.

  21. #20

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    I agree with everything you've said.


    There's a nice edition of Chopin for guitar, 21 pieces transcribed by Richard Yates. They're good transcriptions, no small accomplishment for music of this subtlety and depth. See:


    Frederic Chopin - 21 Selected Pieces



    It's in both standard notation and tab, but separately: all pieces are given first in notation and then on following pages in tab. It's a much better arrangement than notation and tab on the same pages, since that requires more page turns. Also for some reason tab, which I've never used, is just not interesting to look at.


    So when I got a copy, I took it to Kinko's, cut the pages free of the case binding, threw away the tab, and put the notation in a spiral binding. Much nicer.


    Yates, an accomplished guitarist, may have felt a little pained to include tab, or the publisher, Guitar Solo, may have asked for it.