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  1. #301

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon View Post
    outplay, outplay, outplay
    wtf?
    and the winner is.....
    Yeah this is a classic thing where people read (understandably) the later posts in the thread and don’t get the context. I honestly don’t view music in that way.

    It’s more the point - someone who can merely play the notes Joe did at tempo or more complex stuff (which is no mean technical feat of course) cannot ‘outplay’ JP, as JP was also a great musician.

    This is in reference to the tenor of earlier posts. I get impression the OP is new to jazz.

    No actual jazz musician thinks this way of course. It’s not jazz guitar top trumps.

    Won’t stop cats from posting as if that’s what I said. Whatever. If anyone posts this sort of thing I will view it as a wind up....;-)

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #302

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    The bottom line on all this is that Joe Pass could hold a typical touristy, noisy and not necessarily ‘jazz-fan’ audience at Ronnie Scott’s silent and spellbound with an hour of solo jazz guitar. I know because I went there and saw him do it several times. You don’t get to pull that off unless you are a great musician.

    It’s worth noting that Joe’s solo records are not necessarily my favourites, I admire them and like them in small doses, but they get a bit too ‘busy’ for me after a while. Yet I was held spellbound by his solo playing live.

    I guess one of the problems with all these discussions is that a lot of people have not experienced the great jazz players live, they are just going by records, YouTube etc. Without that experience you are missing half the picture, jazz is really meant to be a live music form.

  4. #303

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Reichbart View Post
    Well, without Joe Pass I think it's fair to say my own style and perhaps even ability to make a living might not exist. Some people don't like an artist, some people like an artist enough/sometimes/partially, and some, like myself in this case, internalize an entire musical message and language. So, thanks, Joe. Jake Reichbart
    Thanks, Jake, for making that clear to me. I have been wondering about that as I listen to your music, and was sure that Joe Pass must have been a major influence for you.

    Tony

  5. #304

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    The bottom line on all this is that Joe Pass could hold a typical touristy, noisy and not necessarily ‘jazz-fan’ audience at Ronnie Scott’s silent and spellbound with an hour of solo jazz guitar. I know because I went there and saw him do it several times. You don’t get to pull that off unless you are a great musician.

    It’s worth noting that Joe’s solo records are not necessarily my favourites, I admire them and like them in small doses, but they get a bit too ‘busy’ for me after a while. Yet I was held spellbound by his solo playing live.

    I guess one of the problems with all these discussions is that a lot of people have not experienced the great jazz players live, they are just going by records, YouTube etc. Without that experience you are missing half the picture, jazz is really meant to be a live music form.
    I agree that seeing Joe Pass live was an altogether different experience from listening to his solo studio records. Also, seeing him live gave us (or, at least me) an opportunity to talk to him for a little while. You can't get THAT from a recording.

    Tony

  6. #305

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Yeah this is a classic thing where people read (understandably) the later posts in the thread and don’t get the context. I honestly don’t view music in that way.

    It’s more the point - someone who can merely play the notes Joe did at tempo or more complex stuff (which is no mean technical feat of course) cannot ‘outplay’ JP, as JP was also a great musician.

    This is in reference to the tenor of earlier posts. I get impression the OP is new to jazz.

    No actual jazz musician thinks this way of course. It’s not jazz guitar top trumps.

    Won’t stop cats from posting as if that’s what I said. Whatever. If anyone posts this sort of thing I will view it as a wind up....;-)
    Actually no, I've been following the thread and even posted once or twice.
    Hard to believe it's made it to 7 pages!

  7. #306

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon View Post
    outplay, outplay, outplay
    wtf?
    and the winner is.....
    Well that is a part of the jazz tradition, like it or not. The alpha dog stuff has been going on for a long time, easily since Bird and Diz were on the scene.

    We clap at the end of solos, we yell "go man go" and all that. What other stye of music expects the audience to applaud before the performance is over, in fact several times during? If someone plays a super bad solo we go nuts, if not we gently applaud (or sometimes don' even bother - ever seen that?)

  8. #307

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    For me, jazz guitar is Wes/Joe.

    I can appreciate that many others will feel differently.

    As Mose A said, wouldn’t it be a real drag, if we were all the same.

  9. #308

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    Quote Originally Posted by darkwaters View Post
    I

    excellent

    is that an ES 175 ???
    Casino Coupe with "Antiquity" P90s. Telecaster with S.D. Vintage Stack pickups. Stratocaster with 3 "Little 59s" pickups. Monoprice 5 watt with GG 12AY7 tube and Gold Lion 6V6, and Weber alnico speaker. Fender Rumble 40 with Eminence Baslite speaker.

  10. #309

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon View Post
    outplay, outplay, outplay
    wtf?
    and the winner is.....
    The Thelonious Monk Institute has been renamed the Herbie Hancock Institute, and the 2019 jazz guitar olympics...er competition will be held in Washington D.C on Dec 2 & 3......may the best man win....

    2019 Herbie Hancock Institute of Jazz International Guitar Competition

  11. #310

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    Quote Originally Posted by princeplanet View Post
    Johnny Thunders (original Heartbreakers) was probably more punk than all the Brit punk bands put together. He certainly wasn't "arty farty"... lol
    Johnny Thunders & The Heartbreakers Maxs Kansas City New York 28 apr 1979

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OzPMEII3NEQ


    'nuff said!

  12. #311

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo View Post
    The Thelonious Monk Institute has been renamed the Herbie Hancock Institute, and the 2019 jazz guitar olympics...er competition will be held in Washington D.C on Dec 2 & 3......may the best man win....

    2019 Herbie Hancock Institute of Jazz International Guitar Competition
    The Winter Olympics

    Slalom = bebop?

  13. #312

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    The Winter Olympics

    Slalom = bebop?
    welcome to JGO where good playing is actually despised.


  14. #313

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    Quote Originally Posted by djg View Post
    welcome to JGO where good playing is actually despised.

    Of course. They only do it to show off.

  15. #314

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzstdnt View Post
    Well that is a part of the jazz tradition, like it or not. The alpha dog stuff has been going on for a long time, easily since Bird and Diz were on the scene.

    We clap at the end of solos, we yell "go man go" and all that. What other stye of music expects the audience to applaud before the performance is over, in fact several times during? If someone plays a super bad solo we go nuts, if not we gently applaud (or sometimes don' even bother - ever seen that?)
    Way before. There’s a famous story about Coleman Hawkins trying to cut the Kansas City hornmen so bad that he ended up having to pull an all nighter to get to his next gig.

    And of course there’s the story about Sidney Bechet finding out there was a clarinet who was better than him, so he goes and threatens him at knifepoint.

    Re applause - It is common to clap arias at the opera for similar reasons even today.

    Someone has just done an impressive thing.

    I understand that until recently it was common to applaud between the movements of a concerto.

  16. #315
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Re applause - It is common to clap arias at the opera for similar reasons even today.

    Someone has just done an impressive thing.

    I understand that until recently it was common to applaud between the movements of a concerto.
    Individual solos in bluegrass as well.
    Last edited by matt.guitarteacher; 12-01-2019 at 10:02 AM.

  17. #316

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Of course. They only do it to show off.
    Unpopular opinion Sunday - Joe Pass wasn't all that.-6bb1436c9d9a7400ac48a5814aab89c5-jpg
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  18. #317

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    Individual solos in bluegrass as well.
    Bluegrass nicked the soloing thing from jazz though.

  19. #318

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Bluegrass nicked the soloing thing from jazz though.
    Attending one amateur hour bluegrass jam and an equivalent gypsy jazz jam will reveal more parallels than I care to stomach.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  20. #319

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    Attending one amateur hour bluegrass jam and an equivalent gypsy jazz jam will reveal more parallels than I care to stomach.
    That’s probably why I don’t go to either haha

  21. #320

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    Been posted before, but it's fantastic and here it is again. If this is not "all that," nothing is.



    Joe was a superb ballad player as well as having blazing chops when he wanted to.
    Last edited by Cunamara; 12-01-2019 at 11:54 AM.
    Beauty is as close to terror as we can well endure. -Rainer Maria Rilke

  22. #321

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo View Post
    The Thelonious Monk Institute has been renamed the Herbie Hancock Institute, and the 2019 jazz guitar olympics...er competition will be held in Washington D.C on Dec 2 & 3......may the best man win....

    2019 Herbie Hancock Institute of Jazz International Guitar Competition

    Thanks for that. I hope some promsing new talent is attracted to this. It appears to be set up a bit like the Parkening competition. I'll stay tuned.

  23. #322

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    I grew up in Scotland. My sister liked The Monkees , I liked Hendrix cos he was the most unMonkee like music I could find . My dad liked Stan Getz/Gerry Mulligan/Big Band Stuff , there was always some music blaring around the house. I remember walking in the house one night I think it was early 70's and there on the black and white TV was this funny looking little man in a suit with a huge guitar playing solo music that left an indelible impression on my young impressionable stoned self. Joe Pass!!!!. I can close my eyes and see that moment as clear as day. I was probably 15/16 years old. Took me many more years and many other musical path explorations to come back around to touching bases with Joe's music and once again enjoying that moment of wonder. Joe is like the finest of scotch whisky sip and savour!!!! sip and savour!!!!!!!

    Will

  24. #323

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzstdnt View Post
    Thanks for that. I hope some promsing new talent is attracted to this. It appears to be set up a bit like the Parkening competition. I'll stay tuned.
    Since 1987 it has been the most well known and prestigious jazz competition in the world. A look at past competitors and winners will reveal more than a few contemporary giants.
    Past Winners and Judges - Hancock Institute of Jazz

  25. #324

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    Hey, I think I KNOW you guys.

    Don't tell me---you all go to the same high school, doncha?...

  26. #325

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Way before. There’s a famous story about Coleman Hawkins trying to cut the Kansas City hornmen so bad that he ended up having to pull an all nighter to get to his next gig.

    And of course there’s the story about Sidney Bechet finding out there was a clarinet who was better than him, so he goes and threatens him at knifepoint.

    Re applause - It is common to clap arias at the opera for similar reasons even today.

    Someone has just done an impressive thing.

    I understand that until recently it was common to applaud between the movements of a concerto.


    Hi, C,
    Interesting bits about Hawk and Bechet. I believe, however, that it was more about the money than a talent contest since a working musician, then and now, always wants to guard his precious paying gig. As far as the applause between movements at Classical concerts, its just another sign of the dumbing down of already low-brow audiences who attend these concerts because it is good for their social status among "The Herd." The bored businessman and his "Garden Club" wife ARE the audience du jour, in my opinion, at most of these events.
    At many recent Classical Guitar concerts I've attended, the artist usually talks about the piece he/she is playing and if there are movements tells the audience to wait until the end if they wish to applaud. Ever feel like the horse and wagon driver among a cadre of muscle cars?
    Good playing . . . Marinero

    P.S. I had a very nice, well-paying gig at an upscale Bistro in a suburban/rural area a few years ago and when I put my promotional pix on the front window, the owner told me he was deluged with musicians willing to play for less. I still got the gig and kept it until I left the area but it is a real-life case in point.

  27. #326

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    Quote Originally Posted by WillMbCdn5 View Post
    I grew up in Scotland. My sister liked The Monkees , I liked Hendrix cos he was the most unMonkee like music I could find . My dad liked Stan Getz/Gerry Mulligan/Big Band Stuff , there was always some music blaring around the house. I remember walking in the house one night I think it was early 70's and there on the black and white TV was this funny looking little man in a suit with a huge guitar playing solo music that left an indelible impression on my young impressionable stoned self. Joe Pass!!!!. I can close my eyes and see that moment as clear as day. I was probably 15/16 years old. Took me many more years and many other musical path explorations to come back around to touching bases with Joe's music and once again enjoying that moment of wonder. Joe is like the finest of scotch whisky sip and savour!!!! sip and savour!!!!!!!

    Will
    Very much like me except for the Scotland part. For me, the man playing the huge guitar was Al Caiola on one of the major TV networks' music program, like maybe NBC? one of them had a program that just featured the network ensemble. My dad said the guitarist, whom he said was Al Caiola, was playing and I went crazy with delight. It was much later that I heard Joe Pass and my jazz journey was launched.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  28. #327

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero View Post
    Hi, C,
    Interesting bits about Hawk and Bechet. I believe, however, that it was more about the money than a talent contest since a working musician, then and now, always wants to guard his precious paying gig. As far as the applause between movements at Classical concerts, its just another sign of the dumbing down of already low-brow audiences who attend these concerts because it is good for their social status among "The Herd." The bored businessman and his "Garden Club" wife ARE the audience du jour, in my opinion, at most of these events.
    No, you smug plonker, i meant it was common practice to applaud between movements in the 19th century. This practice ceased relatively recently.

    Concert etiquette - Wikipedia

    It was common practice to talk through operas in the early 18th.

    Why do you think the words in Handel arias repeat so much? Most music was background music in the baroque.

  29. #328

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    No, you smug plonker, i meant it was common practice to applaud between movements in the 19th century. This practice ceased relatively recently.

    Concert etiquette - Wikipedia

    It was common practice to talk through operas in the early 18th.

    Why do you think the words in Handel arias repeat so much? Most music was background music in the baroque.
    "smug plonker"

    I can't stop laughing. I love Brit insults. You win the internet today.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  30. #329

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    Probably shouldn’t have said that. Sorry.

    People are always banging on about the decline of this or that (ok it’s very often me) truth is things of the past didn’t exist in some golden age. It all has a social aspect... music has always been social.

    The conditions that created the cult of the great artist in the 19th century had a lot to do with the rise of bourgeoisie for instance.

    But now music is everywhere, people behave more like aristocrats...

  31. #330

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    Christian is right. I have read various accounts of audiences talking loudly and playing cards during the opera in the 18th C.

    A bit like a typical jazz club in fact.

  32. #331

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    No, you smug plonker, i meant it was common practice to applaud between movements in the 19th century. This practice ceased relatively recently.

    Concert etiquette - Wikipedia

    It was common practice to talk through operas in the early 18th.

    Why do you think the words in Handel arias repeat so much? Most music was background music in the baroque.
    Well, C,
    I never lived in the 18th or 19th Century and never use the commoners(intellectually) bible:Wikipedia-- for any references. I do know that when I first started going to Classical Concerts in the Sixties(Chicago Symphony, Chicago Lyric Opera, University Concerts) there was a decorum of respect/knowledge that was assumed and a base level of education in most audiences--no clapping between movements/no chatter/no tinkling of wine glasses in the gallery--even coughing drew angry stares. However, in the last fifty years, there has been a noticeable decline in the performance of serious music(including Jazz) here in the US and a transition to "Low Brow" musicals, Classical "Favorites" (read Pops Music), and Cirque du Soleil fantasies featured at our major concert halls--ergo the audiences filled with the bored businessman and garden club wife I described earlier and their potentially obnoxious, or inappropriate manners . This is hardly a smug response on my part but rather a sad commentary on my first-hand experience of the status quo in serious music performance and its listeners today. But, perhaps I hit a sore spot with you and YOU are one of those audience types defending your motley clan . . . it's certainly plausible with the sad and childish street talk you prefer to use in your replies as if it elevates your standing among other rude, word-challenged people or ,somehow, makes your remarks more meaningful. I can assure you, among civil and educated people, it has just the opposite effect. Good playing . . . Marinero

    P.S. Finally, as a street kid who grew up on the streets of Chicago in the 50's and 60's in a computer-free world, I always find it sad how people talk to others while behind their computer ,in virtual reality, as opposed to what they would say to a person in a face to face personal encounter. Perhaps it's just the new status quo of life in a virtual world. Not the one I prefer, though.

  33. #332

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    I’m sorry I hurt your feelings

  34. #333

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    Guys this forum is bringing out the worst in me.

    Im tapping out.

    See you at some point. Interested people can find me online elsewhere.

  35. #334

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero View Post
    Well, C,
    I never lived in the 18th or 19th Century and never use the commoners(intellectually) bible:Wikipedia-- for any references. I do know that when I first started going to Classical Concerts in the Sixties(Chicago Symphony, Chicago Lyric Opera, University Concerts) there was a decorum of respect/knowledge that was assumed and a base level of education in most audiences--no clapping between movements/no chatter/no tinkling of wine glasses in the gallery--even coughing drew angry stares. However, in the last fifty years, there has been a noticeable decline in the performance of serious music(including Jazz) here in the US and a transition to "Low Brow" musicals, Classical "Favorites" (read Pops Music), and Cirque du Soleil fantasies featured at our major concert halls--ergo the audiences filled with the bored businessman and garden club wife I described earlier and their potentially obnoxious, or inappropriate manners . This is hardly a smug response on my part but rather a sad commentary on my first-hand experience of the status quo in serious music performance and its listeners today. But, perhaps I hit a sore spot with you and YOU are one of those audience types defending your motley clan . . . it's certainly plausible with the sad and childish street talk you prefer to use in your replies as if it elevates your standing among other rude, word-challenged people or ,somehow, makes your remarks more meaningful. I can assure you, among civil and educated people, it has just the opposite effect. Good playing . . . Marinero

    P.S. Finally, as a street kid who grew up on the streets of Chicago in the 50's and 60's in a computer-free world, I always find it sad how people talk to others while behind their computer ,in virtual reality, as opposed to what they would say to a person in a face to face personal encounter. Perhaps it's just the new status quo of life in a virtual world. Not the one I prefer, though.
    I take exception to your disdain for businessmen and "garden club" wives. You're sneering at them and their tastes explains in part why the music you seem to appreciate is not being played very much. Not because people don't like it, but they can't stand the attitude of its advocates.

    In general, your superior posture even towards people in this group has reminded me why I didn't miss you very much when you were gone.

    And I'd say this to your face as well. No hiding behind the keyboard, just stuck here.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  36. #335

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone View Post
    ...
    In general, your superior posture even towards people in this group has reminded me why I didn't miss you very much when you were gone.

    ....
    Couldn't have been gone for very long if he only joined in July this year... ?

  37. #336

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    Quote Originally Posted by princeplanet View Post
    Couldn't have been gone for very long if he only joined in July this year... ?
    Maybe it just seems like it.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  38. #337

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero View Post
    I just finished reading the thread in re:JP. Very interesting. A few observations that need to be stated/repeated:
    1. The OP expressed a personal opinion and did not represent it as fact
    2. Contrary opinions are not trolling--just contrary opinions
    3. The OP remained a gentleman throughout the discussion; others did not.
    4. Music and Food are the same: not everyone has the same tastes
    5. There is no growth possible in any human endeavor/knowledge if everyone thinks the same way
    6. Music is not a closed box
    7. Technical ability does not the musician make--taste, refinement, pacing, creativity, mood, etc. have equal ,if not greater, importance.
    8. Music is an Art form, not a gymnastic exercise. Technique is only useful for the ability to express one's ideas

    For the record, if I had an hour to listen to Music, it wouldn't be Joe Pass. But, I suppose I shouldn't state my preferences since it might incite anger among some and that should not have been the animus for this discussion. Good Playing . . . Marinero

    -
    - The next big thing what worth to be invest time to examine: How opinion bias works, and how it falsifies perception.
    I mean, the bedroom statement about Wes is practically the definition of trolling. Then how can we talk about remaining gentleman as you stated?

    - Also worth to mention, that careful understanding based on simple logic rules also required.
    I mean just because Joe Pass considered to had good technique, it does not mean, that if anyone who respects him, that is because his technique, Consequently it is not a valid argument neither against Joe Pass nor anyone who likes Joe Pass that music is not gymnastic or similar.


    - Regarding taste: This is a great sentence to lower emotions, so its usage is useful in many situations. But unfortunately it is a half truth. I mean taste is responsibility. You can not eat good or bad food without taking the responsibility, So the matter of taste practically say nothing, especially when trying to somehow evaluate art or an artists contribution.

  39. #338

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    Helluva thread, if only the OP were still here to see his handiwork.

  40. #339

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    I don't see what is so great about Jimmy Raney. Ok, bye.

  41. #340

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    Will the last person to leave the forum please turn off the lights.

  42. #341

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    Will the last person to leave the forum please turn off the lights.
    Okay. I don't plan to leave. I enjoy how much I annoy people.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  43. #342

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    Quote Originally Posted by corpse View Post
    I don't see what is so great about Jimmy Raney. Ok, bye.
    Just wonder if you're serious since some may consider Jimmy Raney to be a 180 from someone like Joe Pass.

  44. #343

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone View Post
    "smug plonker"

    I can't stop laughing. I love Brit insults. You win the internet today.
    I had to look that one up for sure.

    1. (Britain, slang, mildly derogatory) A fool.
    2. (Britain, slang) A penis.
    3. (Britain, slang, dated) A man who sanctions sexual relationships between his girlfriend and his male friends.


    Setting aside "dated" def #3, sounds like this is almost an exact synonym for:

    Schmuck, or shmuck, is a term meaning one who is stupid or foolish, or an obnoxious, contemptible or detestable person. The word came into the English language from Yiddish where it has similar pejorative meanings, but where its literal meaning is a vulgar term for a penis.
    Then my wife reminded the same is true for most other slang words for penis. Dick, tool, prick...
    Last edited by zdub; 12-03-2019 at 11:17 PM.

  45. #344

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    Quote Originally Posted by jameslovestal View Post
    Just wonder if you're serious since some may consider Jimmy Raney to be a 180 from someone like Joe Pass.
    I'm reading it as mordant humor. Check the avatar.
    Best regards, k

  46. #345

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone View Post
    "smug plonker"

    I can't stop laughing. I love Brit insults. You win the internet today.
    The wanker vs. tosser wars are still raging!

  47. #346

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    Funny how stuffy some folks can get on a forum based on music invented in a whorehouse.

  48. #347

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo View Post
    Funny how stuffy some folks can get on a forum based on music invented in a whorehouse.
    I was going to take exception with that description of our beloved art form but quickly was reminded of some of the etymological goodness surrounding the word itself and said fck it.

    Where Did 'Jazz,' the Word, Come From? Follow a Trail of Clues, in Deep Dive with Lewis Porter | WBGO

  49. #348

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    Quote Originally Posted by dconeill View Post
    All I can say is that I always liked his small ensemble recordings, like "Intercontinental", but didn't care at all for his solo recordings.
    Count me in as another one who LOVES his trio album Intercontinental, and believes it exemplifies exactly none of the things the OP says of Joe Pass. In fact I think it is easily his masterwork of melodicism, tatstefullness, tone and swing, and nothing less than one of the top jazz guitar albums of all time.

    I can now easily understand why anyone could be off-put by the solo recordings though, which don't do it for me anymore. Funny thing was as a budding teenage guitarist I was cuckoo for the solo album "Virtuoso" as my entry into jazz appreciation (and transcription), but disliked (???!!!) Intercontinental and what I somehow mistakenly thought was some loungy schmaltziness in the trio styling (???!!!). So I of all people should understand how people can have widely varying perceptions, since I have have personally been two of those people so far.
    Last edited by MattR; 12-03-2019 at 11:09 PM.

  50. #349

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattR View Post
    Count me in as another one who LOVES his trio album Intercontinental, and believes it exemplifies none of the things the OP says of Joe Pass. In fact I think it is easily his masterwork of melodicism, tatstefullness and swing, and nothing less than one of the top jazz guitar albums of all time.

    I can now easily understand why anyone could be off-put by the solo recordings though, which don't do it for me anymore. Funny thing was as a budding teenage guitarist I was cuckoo for the solo album "Virtuoso" as my entry into jazz appreciation (and transcription), but disliked (???!!!) Intercontinental and what I somehow mistakenly thought was some loungy schmaltziness in the trio styling (???!!!). So I of all people should understand how people can have widely varying perceptions, since I have have personally been two of those people so far.
    That was the first album I heard of his, found in a cutout bin like so many other treasures, and instantly got me hooked on JP. Love so much of his other stuff but find some of it too frenetic and tiring to listen to (especially when accompanied with mixing like on the first Oscar Peterson Pablo LP with, among other things, that infernally loud clapping from the audience between tunes). But Intercontinental has stood the test of time, still one of my all-time favorite jazz guitar albums. It also got me into Eberhard Weber who was also well-represented in those bins ala The Colours of Chloë...

  51. #350

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    For solo check out”Blues for Fred.” I find that an incredible solo guitar recording with beautiful tone.


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    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town