Likes Likes:  0
Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Posts 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1

    User Info Menu

    Hi everyone,

    Just something that came up with something I had written.

    I wrote a simple chord melody with Dm7 G7 and Cmaj7 - with a melody linking things back to the start again - very basic but the melody turns out to be the notes of G A C D and E played backwards.

    I know these notes are inside a G pentatonic scale but I was wondering could these notes on their own also be some extended G arpeggio?

    Thinking of the formula this would be a 1 2 4 5 and 6 (in G) - is there even such a chord as this? I immediately thought of some sort of sus chord with the 1 2 then the 4 changes that I think?

    Anyone any ideas?

    I'm just curious to know......

    Thanks

    James

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    How about C9/6? The C chord contributes the C-E-G, the 9th is D and the 6th is A.

  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    Am11

  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by voelker View Post
    Am11
    Hi,

    Just wondering how this could be Am11 when the arp played (ascending) is G A C D and E played backwards i.e, E D C A and G?

    Are you talking of the "Am 11 sound" over this chord progression?

    I'm a bit confused? I'm think of G being the root note....

    James

  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    It doesn't matter what order you play the pitches. All you have is a collection of pitches, and they may spell Am11 (if you take the A as a root), or CM6/9 (if you take the C as the root). Or, they might be construed as to spell something else. Kind of depends.

    The human ear is something of a mystery as far as what it "hears" in a given collection of pitches. It is really very context-sensitive and depends on things like what note is the root, what harmonic elements precede the current chord (i.e. the ear "expects" certain things to happen), etc.

    I wouldn't really get all wrapped up in exactly what the 'correct' spelling of the arp/chord you're talking about is. Just do what sounds good. :-) That method has worked for thousands of years.

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by jlg1 View Post
    Hi,

    Just wondering how this could be Am11 when the arp played (ascending) is G A C D and E played backwards i.e, E D C A and G?

    Are you talking of the "Am 11 sound" over this chord progression?

    I'm a bit confused? I'm think of G being the root note....

    James
    Call it a G 6/9 sus4 then.

    You may find when you put it into a progression it's really C 6/9/G.

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by FatJeff View Post
    It doesn't matter what order you play the pitches. All you have is a collection of pitches, and they may spell Am11 (if you take the A as a root), or CM6/9 (if you take the C as the root). Or, they might be construed as to spell something else. Kind of depends.

    The human ear is something of a mystery as far as what it "hears" in a given collection of pitches. It is really very context-sensitive and depends on things like what note is the root, what harmonic elements precede the current chord (i.e. the ear "expects" certain things to happen), etc.

    I wouldn't really get all wrapped up in exactly what the 'correct' spelling of the arp/chord you're talking about is. Just do what sounds good. :-) That method has worked for thousands of years.
    No I totally agree - I dont usually get bogged down in a lot of theory - but you know what its like you play something - then you start to think - "what is that?" it sounded and also looked i.e, G A C D and E that it could be an arp - notes are also from G Pent Major of course.

    I agree its what sounds good at the end of the day - though sometimes nice to have a name for it as well! LOL

    Thanks

    James

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by GodinFan View Post
    Call it a G 6/9 sus4 then.

    You may find when you put it into a progression it's really C 6/9/G.
    Ok,

    Yeah I can see depending on the progression it could be either.

    Thanks

    James


  10. #9

    User Info Menu

    G13 (9,11)

  11. #10

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by FatJeff View Post
    Just do what sounds good.
    Agreed!

    In the end, our ears are all that matter.

  12. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg_Dubs View Post
    Agreed!

    In the end, our ears are all that matter.
    Unless you're trying to codify it so others can play your music the way you'd like it played.

  13. #12

    User Info Menu

    If you enjoy the sound, the "harmonic principle" of your line, memorize that sound and learn to replicate it any key, whenever the music asks for it.

    Don't worry about where it comes from. .
    www.myspace.com/certainlyduo -- New Demo Released!

  14. #13

    User Info Menu

    G A C D E is the pentatonic C D E G A or A C D E G
    Pentatonics can be very ambiguous harmonically.

    These notes are a subset of the C major, F major and G major scales.
    Looking at the notes in relation to all those possible roots.

    ----------G A C D E
    C---------5 6 1 9 3
    D-------11 5 b7 1 9
    E-------b3 11 b6 b7 1
    F---------9 3 5 6 7
    G--------1 9 11 5 6
    A-------b7 1 b3 11 5
    B-------b6 b7 b9 b3 11
    Bb------6 7 9 3 #11
    F#-----b9 #9 b5 #5 b7

    some alternate names
    b3=#9
    b5=#11
    m6=#5=b13
    6=13

    These differences in naming can affect how we see the functionality of the notes.

    Ultimately it comes down to the composer to give a name to what they
    hear and the performer to use that info or reconceptualize it in their own way.
    Last edited by bako; 01-10-2010 at 10:31 PM.

  15. #14

    User Info Menu

    given the harmonic progression, I would call C the root.
    I tend to think of a major pentatonic containing a Root, M2nd, M3rd, P5th, and M6th. (basically, take out the tritone in the scale and, viola!)

    Given the C natural in the melody and lack of a B natural, I hear a suspended type of harmonic implication as related to a G root. granted, you could call it whatever you want, my ear leans twards C

    However, as Bako mentioned, pentatonic scales can be used in a veriety of ways over any chord, two of my favorites are from the 5th and/or 9th of a chord of the same quality, ie. major pent from the 5th/9th of a major chord, minor pent from the 5th/9th of a minor chord.

    Or... minor pent from the 7th/#9 of a altered chord
    Or... minor pent from the 7th/4th on a min7(b5)

    I find this way of thinking very helpful in writing melody or busting out my smooth jazz licks on the fly due to the intensely guitar-centric and melodic qualities of the pentatonic scales.
    Last edited by timscarey; 01-10-2010 at 10:11 PM.