Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Posts 51 to 62 of 62
  1. #51

    User Info Menu

    Yes, that's the slim volume he wrote before the Harmonic Mechanisms. The rhythm guitarist with Chic says he worked a lot with that book. It has wider applications than jazz.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    Yes, that's the slim volume he wrote before the Harmonic Mechanisms. The rhythm guitarist with Chic says he worked a lot with that book. It has wider applications than jazz.
    While I studied with Ted Greene, he was studying with GVE..Ted said..look triads or any chord actually are just frozen moving voices..and indeed they are..
    play well ...
    wolf

  4. #53
    Okay, I'm halfway through Harmonic minor scales. And while practicing I notice that I don't actually memorize the function of the triad (Dm, C dim, Aaug etc), however it's writter above the triad, so I think it's there for some reason. Should a student memorize the names of these functions a well? I also noticed that it's easy to deduce the function from the top note - it the top note is D then it's D triad.

  5. #54

    User Info Menu

    I think you should memorise everything - positions, fingering, notes, function. I said above, for the major keys I find it helpful to remember:

    Major

    minor-minor

    Major-Major

    minor-diminished

    But knowing which is the vi chord, or the ii chord, etc, is also important.

  6. #55
    Hey guys,
    I've come back from 2-weeks holiday, where I didn't have a guitar to practice. But I didn't waste my time there. I did a lot of vizualiation stuff. When I was relaxing I vizualized the fingerboard and "played" the triads up and down the neck. While I played the triad I also named the notes, the triad and the step, like this: (in C major scale) f,a,d - d minor - 2nd step, g,b,e - e minor - 3rd step etc.
    It helped me not forget what I practiced at home, and also helped memorize things like names of triads and steps. By the way, in his interview George said that he vizualized a lot.
    Now I'm back and ready to continue my study of Harmonic Mechanisms.

  7. #56

    User Info Menu

    Let us know if the visualization stuff worked.
    "Ahhh - those Jazz guys are just makin' that stuff up!" - Homer Simpson

    "Anyone who understands Jazz knows that you can't understand it. It's too complicated. That's what's so simple about it." - Yogi Berra

  8. #57
    Hey guys,
    I'm happy to let you know that I finished going through Harmonic minor scales in first inversions. Some things start to clear up. Visualization stuff actually worked, like I said in the previous post. The only thing when I visualize the scale I don't use the string set transfer as in the book, I move up the neck from the lowest note to the highest on 4/3, then again from the lowest to the highest on 3/3, then the same on 2/3 and finally on 1/3. It takes longer than usual playing exercise but helps memorize the neck better.
    Cheeeers!

  9. #58

    User Info Menu

    Hello,

    I have been working a little bit on georges van eps harmonic mechanisms for guitar, and I am trying to figure out why the open triads he uses in the book are not the regular open triads. Is it just to work something unusual with big strings skippings?

    And also why the regular open triads positions are missing, it seems weird in such an exhaustive book...

  10. #59
    Hey guys,
    It's been a while since my last post, and you probably thought that I gave up on Harmonic Mechanisms, like most people do. But I didn't. I continue working with Harmonic Mechanisms and I am very happy that didn't give up. I've progressed slow in the last few months, right now I'm finishing second inversion triads in melodic minor. I notice how I start recognizing triad names when I play them. Also I notice how my technique improves and how I started utilizing different triads over the same bass note in my regular playing.
    How have you guys been doing?

  11. #60

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by jetaman View Post
    Hey guys,
    It's been a while since my last post, and you probably thought that I gave up on Harmonic Mechanisms, like most people do. But I didn't. I continue working with Harmonic Mechanisms and I am very happy that didn't give up. I've progressed slow in the last few months, right now I'm finishing second inversion triads in melodic minor. I notice how I start recognizing triad names when I play them. Also I notice how my technique improves and how I started utilizing different triads over the same bass note in my regular playing.
    How have you guys been doing?
    when you begin to move the voices in each "chord shape" and see how they develope (morph) into other "chords" thus creating both harmonic AND melodic movement..you then have many "mini" progressions that revolve around each chord you play..see Ted Greens' vids and web site (he studied with GVE) this type of playing is close to "classical" guitar playing technique applied to jazz - standards and pop tunes -

    use some of the chord forms from the mel minor in a minor blues and see what developes..
    play well ...
    wolf

  12. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by wolflen View Post
    when you begin to move the voices in each "chord shape" and see how they develope (morph) into other "chords" thus creating both harmonic AND melodic movement..you then have many "mini" progressions that revolve around each chord you play..see Ted Greens' vids and web site (he studied with GVE) this type of playing is close to "classical" guitar playing technique applied to jazz - standards and pop tunes - use some of the chord forms from the mel minor in a minor blues and see what developes..
    Thanks, with every exercise behind I start to see more and more. I've heard about Ted Greene a while ago, and I even tried to study some of his materials. I know that he studied with George. That's why I decide to study Harmonic Mechanisms first before going any further.I don't know if it's been mentioned before but while watching Ted Greene's video on Baroque Improv part 2, in 7:16 he says to Steve Herberman: "You should make sure that you have all your harmonized scales together. You can have that if you've gone through George's books". So I'm pretty sure that by George's Books he means Harmonic Mechanisms, and Steve is known for having worked with these books.I know that Steve visited this thread, so, Steve if you still visit this forum can you confirm this?
    Update on HM: finished all scales for Second Inversion. Start Root triads, page 40.

  13. #62

    User Info Menu

    After almost 40 years of studying... I know so little about the guitar. Jeez. Ted was amazing.
    Beauty is as close to terror as we can well endure. -Rainer Maria Rilke