The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
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  1. #51

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    Finally got to some guitar work this week. I finished chiseling the faces of the 2-pieces kerfing on top of the braces even with the rest, as well as chiseling the top/back plate surfaces of kerfing close to the sides, so as to minimize the flush sanding next week.
    Here we go again..-af9044dd-f774-4c79-94be-26a21aad37d0-jpg
    Here we go again..-fc10b818-3acc-4140-970f-9cfc7d460395-jpgHere we go again..-eb6298ef-cbdc-4ce0-8cb0-04e6d98d1464-jpgHere we go again..-3c0c715b-9af1-447c-ade2-1e731fc13152-jpg

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  3. #52

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    Great to see you made some progress and it’s looking good. I’m currently to tired to spend time doing something for real. Cad drawings I still tweak once in a while but I should be disassembling the old cupboard to laminate the bulk of the wood!
    So hats off!


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  4. #53

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    Got a couple of hours yesterday to flush sand the shell:
    Here we go again..-807bfcaf-0c2d-4f70-a6f9-d10b413d6c42-jpg
    Here we go again..-d5ba2690-76bd-4daf-98d4-5869862f17a6-jpg

    I also traced the body shape on the spruce and Birdseye maple using a 1/8” washer to give myself some margin of safety.

    Because the boards I used don’t allow for excess, I decided to choose an off-center mark for the centerline at the tail end of the guitar for both the top (and back) plates:
    Here we go again..-1584bcb4-226c-461b-835b-dfa8652c18f8-jpg

    Here’s the centerline of the top plate:
    Here we go again..-4c0e743d-e1d8-4909-b17b-851f222fe467-jpg

    Position of the top plate:
    Here we go again..-715d2bb3-eac4-4de9-84c4-2b86036057e5-jpg
    Tracing:
    Here we go again..-da7b1ad2-5a9a-4b9a-b6c9-6e32d8194a9e-jpg

    Back plate tracing:
    Here we go again..-48678801-e5a4-4483-a2ca-555d73dac6b3-jpg

    Will start marking out the 6 pieces of plywood to make the new carving/clamping cauls this week and hopefully, bandsaw and laminate them this weekend.

  5. #54

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    Clamping cauls, archtop then or just not to scratch too and backplate? Looks really good!


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  6. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eck View Post
    Clamping cauls, archtop then or just not to scratch too and backplate? Looks really good!


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    Thanks, Eck. Yes, it'll be a super small-bodied archtop. Half the fun with the build is carving the top and back plates!

  7. #56

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    Quote Originally Posted by sbeishline View Post
    Because the boards I used don’t allow for excess, I decided to choose an off-center mark for the centerline at the tail end of the guitar for both the top (and back) plates:
    Here we go again..-1584bcb4-226c-461b-835b-dfa8652c18f8-jpg
    For the high-craft approach you could use an extra-wide inlay on the heel to cover that up, or purfle in a decorative square that extends equally on both sides of the new center-line, to camo over the original center-line.

    Or go low -- wood-filler and solid color ! ? ! ?

  8. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Sherry View Post
    For the high-craft approach you could use an extra-wide inlay on the heel to cover that up, or purfle in a decorative square that extends equally on both sides of the new center-line, to camo over the original center-line.

    Or go low -- wood-filler and solid color ! ? ! ?
    Thanks, Sam - both good options to consider. I'm thinking maybe the wide inlay with something on the end graft would be the way to do it.

    I'd love to buy a cheap HVLP sprayer to try a nitro lacquer, cuz I'd love to try doing a burst color. I don't have a true HVLP system and only have a small tank regular air compressor. Was a good experience doing the classic French polish on the first one, but it really is tedious, time consuming, and labor intensive.

    I'd love it if anyone out there has suggestions!

  9. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by sbeishline View Post
    Thanks, Sam - both good options to consider. I'm thinking maybe the wide inlay with something on the end graft would be the way to do it.

    I'd love to buy a cheap HVLP sprayer to try a nitro lacquer, cuz I'd love to try doing a burst color. I don't have a true HVLP system and only have a small tank regular air compressor. Was a good experience doing the classic French polish on the first one, but it really is tedious, time consuming, and labor intensive.

    I'd love it if anyone out there has suggestions!
    I once bought a not-even-really-cheap paint spray. It clogged at first use and I’ve taken it apart twice with no success. I’m used to being able to repair most things. Maybe you can rent a very good HVLP?
    An option that you might consider is a ‘34 sunburst (I think that’s the number). It’s a sunburst over the center part of the top, which some es-235’s have, and 235s also have a mini arch. I thinking trogly’s guitar channel on YouTube has a piece on that super-old style sunburst if you’re interested.


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  10. #59

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    Week before last I traced the guitar shell onto the six pieces of 3/4” plywood:
    Here we go again..-0c072c84-a471-4056-abc9-fd896998fb40-jpg

    Then last weekend, I cut out all the pieces on the bandsaw and got the 2 cauls glued up:
    Here we go again..-6d301501-d6db-421c-bc6d-6b4136fded61-jpg

    Top plate caul:
    Here we go again..-598f47af-46c5-457f-b9aa-05453b53fe9b-jpg

    Here we go again..-d5012728-d155-4570-8283-fa2348e33249-jpg

    Back plate caul:
    Here we go again..-4910e2de-b6af-4ce3-9879-15f7a64f0491-jpg
    Here we go again..-a4d0abe6-97dd-4681-b019-d2943328f294-jpg

    Both clamped:
    Here we go again..-02cde633-5fb1-4e4e-9537-6aa9005467a8-jpg

    Sunday is my last day in the shop for 7-8wks as my buddy whose shop I use is going on a long holiday. I will try to finish the cauls (run on the spindle sander, round over the top edges, and route an inner ledge on the inside to accommodate the arch). I’ll also bandsaw out the top and back plates. I acquired a bench top drill press and will hopefully get a decent setup so that I can use it to begin to Safe-T-plane the plates and start the carving process while Steve is gone.

  11. #60

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    I assume you plan on drawing out your topo map of the outside arch and using the Safe-T-Plane to rout out the contour “terraces”. May I suggest you build yourself a router sled instead? The Safety-T-planer doesn’t really like having more than 50% of the head engaged unless it is stupendously well set up.

    With a router sled you can secure your blank to your workbench and move a tool meant to be hand held. You can also use surfacing bits that have much more forgiving geometry. The extra time in using a 1-1/2” bit rather than a 5” cutter is more than made up by not having to wash your shorts when the Safe-T-Planer rips the blank from you hand and threatens you hand modeling career.


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  12. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by rlrhett
    I assume you plan on drawing out your topo map of the outside arch and using the Safe-T-Plane to rout out the contour “terraces”. May I suggest you build yourself a router sled instead? The Safety-T-planer doesn’t really like having more than 50% of the head engaged unless it is stupendously well set up.

    With a router sled you can secure your blank to your workbench and move a tool meant to be hand held. You can also use surfacing bits that have much more forgiving geometry. The extra time in using a 1-1/2” bit rather than a 5” cutter is more than made up by not having to wash your shorts when the Safe-T-Planer rips the blank from you hand and threatens you hand modeling career.


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    Thanks, Rhett! Been wondering where you were.

    I’m unfamiliar with that method. Do you have any pics of the sled or router bits for it?

  13. #62

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    Got to the shop yesterday for a little bit to finish running the outside of the cauls on the spindle sander. Then I use the handheld router to rabbet a lower edge to accommodate the arch and finally to round over the outside edge:
    Here we go again..-3da299dc-f3b0-4b6f-9ee0-9b4b9123bbc2_1_201_a-jpg

    Here we go again..-60f1d723-0e7d-4f54-88ef-2a55c3c44da6_1_201_a-jpg

    Here we go again..-ebcac088-6da1-415e-870c-fa50b5c13d37_1_201_a-jpg

    I then drilled the recessed holes on the tabs for the hold-down clamps, but didn't take a pic.

  14. #63

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    After I finished up the cauls, I decided to get the top and back plates cut out on the bandsaw.

    Started with the Birdseye:
    Here we go again..-36d059c8-a325-446e-8357-753afa26ebdc_1_201_a-jpg

    Followed by the spruce:

    Here we go again..-9a043c6f-44bb-4a3e-b886-4d7271df29ff_1_201_a-jpg

    Obigatory photo of the full-thickness top and back on the shell:
    Here we go again..-49af2efb-15b1-406a-af2d-f3289b4a4e03_1_201_a-jpegHere we go again..-bafcb10a-dd6f-42e9-9590-9ad53ee51fab_1_201_a-jpeg

    This is the end-graft alignment:
    Here we go again..-3a9ffd62-8d0b-4b53-a751-15d74a71654d_1_201_a-jpg

  15. #64

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    Wow! That’s a lot of chopping to do. If it helps there is a YouTube clip by a Belgian called Chick’s guitars (if I got spelling right) who build a guitar out of a bookshelve. He expertly drills away and finishes with chide and sanding.


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  16. #65

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    Due to shop time limitation before my buddy leaves, I forged ahead getting the generalized arch contour started with the Safe-T-plane on the drill press table at Steve's being I'm unfamiliar with Rhett's setup. His drill press is substantial and accurate, and despite this not being the safest method, it worked out okay. As opposed to the other guitar, this piece of Birdseye is a hair over 3/4" to start (not 1"), so this will be less deep of a back plate arch. Started by setting the shell on the back plate and marking the neck body joint (15th) fret and then marked the bridge location using the fret calculator:
    Here we go again..-3efab20c-2fc2-428e-86cf-c69f557f02f6_1_201_a-jpg

    Started terracing:
    Here we go again..-4f607d39-f200-4a2c-898d-c4eb36e4c285_1_201_a-jpg

    Half used the sized-down Benedetto template, but also did some freehand changes to better fit the shape:
    Here we go again..-ac9d57e0-05dd-44b6-ab0f-70cad2c6610c_1_201_a-jpg

    This back will have a much more gentle arch. Final look with edges at 1/4":
    Here we go again..-b3f09efd-0115-4d2b-a3ee-f574c0ede5ac_1_201_a-jpg

    Lastly, I did the same bridge marking on the top plate:
    Here we go again..-57abeba2-2a30-4f26-b415-4b8f0f9e3336_1_201_a-jpg

    Here's the contour map that I'll get started tomorrow:
    Here we go again..-f8e8b6c5-ccfe-43d2-9ae3-dc54a2db3148_1_201_a-jpg

  17. #66

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    Sorry, I don’t visit this site like I used to.

    At its most basic the router sled is a frame or box that captures the base of a hand held router so that it can slide in one direction but not the other. It essentially extends the router base in one dimension on either side about, say, 18”. This rides on two jointed boards attached to your table. Between the two rails you fix your blank.

    Most often they are used to flatten wide boards that are too big for a jointer. Here’s a random example from YouTube:



    Of course, no one said you had to flatten all the way across, or at a single depth. It is actually a very common technique to rough carve Les Paul or PRS style tops. We had students use the technique quite successfully, although the technique I learned decades ago was the same as this guy:




    I built a dozen archtops just like this guy before I switched to rough carving with a CNC and tuning with scrapers and finger planes.

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  18. #67

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    Starting to look very good indeed. You’ll have to make more now that you have all the cauls, jigs and templates!


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  19. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eck View Post
    Wow! That’s a lot of chopping to do. If it helps there is a YouTube clip by a Belgian called Chick’s guitars (if I got spelling right) who build a guitar out of a bookshelve. He expertly drills away and finishes with chide and sanding.


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    You're right. Making carving/clamping cauls is a lot of band sawing!

  20. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by rlrhett View Post
    Sorry, I don’t visit this site like I used to.

    At its most basic the router sled is a frame or box that captures the base of a hand held router so that it can slide in one direction but not the other. It essentially extends the router base in one dimension on either side about, say, 18”. This rides on two jointed boards attached to your table. Between the two rails you fix your blank.

    Most often they are used to flatten wide boards that are too big for a jointer. Here’s a random example from YouTube:



    Of course, no one said you had to flatten all the way across, or at a single depth. It is actually a very common technique to rough carve Les Paul or PRS style tops. We had students use the technique quite successfully, although the technique I learned decades ago was the same as this guy:




    I built a dozen archtops just like this guy before I switched to rough carving with a CNC and tuning with scrapers and finger planes.

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro I/O
    Thanks, Rhett! This video makes it very clear how to go about that method. The Safe-T-planer method was okay, but it's certainly comes off a bit rough at times if the depth is too much. I'll definitely try the handheld router method on my next one.

  21. #70

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    Yesterday in the shop, I started the same process as the back plate- traced the shell and marked the bridge location:
    Here we go again..-a190805b-15b2-4cad-ae0f-2f1107153137-jpg

    Terraced away until it was to 1/4” on the last level:
    Here we go again..-07fc26d3-f443-42c8-a2d9-a80db056bc7f-jpg

    I sharpened all the plane blades on the Tormek and will hit them on the water stones this week before the carving begins.

  22. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by sbeishline View Post
    Yesterday in the shop, I started the same process as the back plate- traced the shell and marked the bridge location:
    Here we go again..-a190805b-15b2-4cad-ae0f-2f1107153137-jpg

    Terraced away until it was to 1/4” on the last level:
    Here we go again..-07fc26d3-f443-42c8-a2d9-a80db056bc7f-jpg

    I sharpened all the plane blades on the Tormek and will hit them on the water stones this week before the carving begins.
    What plane is that between the lie nielsen and the veritas?

  23. #72

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohanAbrandt View Post
    What plane is that between the lie nielsen and the veritas?
    D’Angelico hand plane:

    D'Angelico plane, large sole

  24. #73

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    Quote Originally Posted by sbeishline View Post
    D’Angelico hand plane:

    D'Angelico plane, large sole
    Nice

  25. #74

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    Started the first of several sessions in the outside of the back plate carving.

    I started with the Stanley block plane until I wasn’t making good contact, and switched the LN 101 violin plane.

    After start:
    Here we go again..-9125c022-b05b-40d3-99af-efd67f7c4c3c-jpg

    Next:
    Here we go again..-d4978a19-0926-459c-9f20-56809c79b236-jpg

    Where it stands:
    Here we go again..-806dbbe3-f9eb-4bf9-a9fb-1b3f7f53873c-jpg

  26. #75

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    I’m planning to politely borrow a color scheme from one of my favorite builder’s guitars (IYKYK).

    Ordered these TransTints from veneersupplies.com as they were each $10 cheaper than Stewie and they had additional colors. Super fast shipping, too!
    Here we go again..-70ad385b-1ba1-49bf-a21b-38f8d44bdf17-jpg

    Saved the cutoff pieces of top and back plates for testing colors and learning to hand stain a burst. I’ve watched a bunch of YouTube videos and will prolly just sorta wing it and have some fun.

    For the sides, will be aiming for sort of rosewoody brown. What you see there is 52 drops in 1/2oz water and I prolly dipped and wiped 3 times.
    Here we go again..-1a2d972d-ee50-4d77-987d-c036d31063f9-jpg

    Planning to have the top and back will be sort of a dark purple/brown to wine to purple burst. The purple is 16drops to 1/2oz water and Bordeaux was 32drops to 1/2oz water.
    Here we go again..-cbec52e7-e544-467b-bbce-c0cac2a4b963-jpg

    We’ll see how it looks after it dries and what happens with a second coat..