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  1. #1

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    Someone told me that an heavy or light tailpiece on an Aechtop is the same things ? Is it true ? Could a properly made tailpiece affect the guitar playability ?

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  3. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by belfagor
    Someone told me that an heavy or light tailpiece on an Aechtop is the same things ? Is it true ? Could a properly made tailpiece affect the guitar playability ?
    The distribution of mass anywhere in a vibrating system (like your archtop guitar) will to a greater or lesser degree have an effect on the sounds the guitar makes. A properly made tailpiece is as essential as accurate and stable tuners. Everything contributes to the whole.

  4. #3
    Ths for your kind answers citizenk 74

  5. #4
    It seems that Mr Slaman pay great attention to the tailpieces contruction . I really like the Slaman guitar sounds . Obiouvsly he pay attentions from start to finisch a every guitar details tailpiece included.

  6. #5

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    Re: playability

    My theory is that the greater the 'free string' length between the bridge & tailpiece the
    easier the playing (for the fretting hand.)

    Somewhere Ken Parker asserts this also but I can't remember just where right now, sorry.

  7. #6

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    The tailpiece certainly affects the tone. I've changed a few, and the difference can sometimes be dramatic. I once changed an archtop from an Eastman-style, ebony on top of metal tailpiece for a much lighter L-5 style, but thinner. That tailpiece didn't last long because the sound was much too tinny and trebly. But the action was the same, no difference there on any I've switched, but admittedly they were all of the approximate same length. Using a much shorter tailpiece might give a somewhat softer string feel, but could also have other unintended consequences. As Citizen74k said, everything affects everything on an archtop.

  8. #7

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    Ken Parker:


  9. #8
    Really THS for the video .

  10. #9

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    ....so am I correct - re: K Parker - the ' shorter the tp the greater the after length and the less tension there will be on the strings, making the guitar easier to play ' ??....

    ......absolutely never knew that.....

    Thanks........

  11. #10

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    That's correct. The longer the strings, from tailpiece to tuner, the softer the feel. The tension will be the same, but the feel will be softer. A guitar with a stop tailpiece, especially where the bridge is the top of the tailpiece, will have a much stiffer feel. Same tension (assuming same scale length) but different feel.

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    That's correct. The longer the strings, from tailpiece to tuner, the softer the feel. The tension will be the same, but the feel will be softer. A guitar with a stop tailpiece, especially where the bridge is the top of the tailpiece, will have a much stiffer feel. Same tension (assuming same scale length) but different feel.
    I think that was part of Epiphone's idea with the Frequensator tailpiece.

  13. #12
    That's very helpful ths

  14. #13

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    Searched a lot but can not find web video of a custom flat-top with 1-1/2" extra length
    between the nut & both 'E' string tuners of 3-on-a-side headstock intended for the same
    playability result.

    Sorry 'bout that.

  15. #14

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    .......So has anyone ever changed out a five in. or greater tp for a 4 in ? Did anything improve ? Were any other adjustments needed ?

    Also, what were those LP models that had those really long trapeze tp's ? What was supposed to be the thinking behind those ?

    Found these two - -w/2 different length tp's ( ? ) . Are there any discernible sound / tonal differences ?

    Early 1952 Gibson Les Paul Standard (early, RARE unbound | Reverb

    Gibson Les Paul 1953 Goldtop with original BR6 amp | Wavin | Reverb

    Thx
    Last edited by Dennis D; 08-23-2021 at 07:13 PM.

  16. #15

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    The thinking behind the trapeze tailpieces on early LP models was, AFAIK, to provide a cheap and adjustable system, and the stop tailpiece was not yet in wide use. You could move the bridge very slightly to adjust intonation by turning the nuts that held the bridge in place. They just hadn't yet figured out that there was a better way.

    I don't know that an extra inch will noticeably affect the feel on a guitar. They're all different, and the idea of greater total length providing softer action does depend on a very low-friction interface a the bridge and nut. If there is any binding, at the sides or bottom of the slots, both the tuning stability and feel will be affected. I don't spend a lot of time worrying about feel, but I do want a perfectly smooth, perfectly sized slot at both ends, for tuning ease.

  17. #16
    Myne you're right but slaman's tailpiecies are very long indeed . I don't think that his guitars are uncofortable . It wouldn't be useful ....

  18. #17

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    Look for banjo tailpieces : no-knots or others, the sound differs a lot. You are talking about acoustic features (check Roger Siminoff)... The ease of playing depends on a lot of other things.... (sorry for my pooor English!)