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  1. #26

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    And I just remembered I have a saxophone reed I can use to shim the fracture (don't ask me why I have one that's a whole other tale in and of itself).

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  3. #27

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    Stage Two

    So I just hope I got enough glue in there. I was able to shim open the crack enough to slide the syringe inside. Then I filled as much as possible, gently twisting the headstock and pushing more glue in as it began to be forced out the other end. Then I clamped it between two pieces of plywood and a cloth around the neck itself. Wiped off the excess.

    Guess I'll check in tomorrow night and show you what the story is.

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  4. #28
    Nice! For 20 20 hindsight though, don't use anything to wedge in there except something solid, like a piece of plastic cut from a disposable cup or something like that. Wood, like that reed will break when it gets really thin, and any piece of wood, no matter how small, will compromise the perfect fit of the wood grains. Nothing like a tiny splinter to keep those two perfectly matched mated grain halves from getting back together.
    But I'll bet it was OK. Congrats!!
    Clamp, wait and offer something nice to your favourite deity.

  5. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note
    don't use anything to wedge in there except something solid, like a piece of plastic cut from a disposable cup or something like that. Wood, like that reed will break when it gets really thin, and any piece of wood, no matter how small, will compromise the perfect fit of the wood grains.
    Yea I considered that when I heard it snap inside the neck. Don't worry- I pulled it out and the reed was still all there. But I immediately thought to myself, damn that probably wasn't wise. Idk where my common sense went tonight haha.

  6. #30

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    Thanks for the help man! Can't wait to get this puppy back into shape. I took the time to fix it up some too- tightened up the nuts on the tuning pegs, turned around a couple saddles on the two strings that stopped short of proper intonation while in the forward position, put on some speed knobs for something different... We'll see how it turns out in the end.

  7. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by BiscoDrew
    Yea I considered that when I heard it snap inside the neck. Don't worry- I pulled it out and the reed was still all there. But I immediately thought to myself, damn that probably wasn't wise. Idk where my common sense went tonight haha.
    Remember that advice about doing a complete dry run? Now you know why. You're lucky, you got off easy. Not a lesson you're going to forget. First time through it's impossible to get everything right, and there's the pressure of glue drying.
    Good luck when the bandages come off!

  8. #32

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    Now I'm looking at this polyurethane I got. Doing some research and I'm starting to think a cyano drop fill might be more practical.

  9. #33

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    The failure looks unusual for an epiphon -- as if it has one piece neck, like a gibson. I can't see a joint on pictures - is this a one piece neck?

  10. #34

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    Probably this is it: Could someone in the "know" clear this up for me? - Epiphone Electrics - Gibson Brands Forums
    My epi had a two piece neck - with a joint around 2nd fret

  11. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Danil
    The failure looks unusual for an epiphon -- as if it has one piece neck, like a gibson. I can't see a joint on pictures - is this a one piece neck?
    I severely doubt it. This is an 08, coming from the Qing Dao plant (China). I was under the impression it was two pieces glued together.

  12. #36
    Necks from the Gibson factory
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    They all have two piece necks-at least; not including the "wings" of the peghead. "One Piece Neck" refers to the fact that it's not laminated along the centre line. Every guitar has the head stock glued on. I use a V join on my guitars, but the scarf joint is most common. On classier handmade instruments the diamond shaped enforcement or volute helps to add strength to this very vulnerable achilles heel of the guitar. These days with CNC technology, it's a lot easier to put a volute onto a neck.
    The angled headstock necessitates a two piece arrangement or else you'd waste a massive amount of wood on each neck. Fender got around this by putting the headstock on the same plane as the neck itself, so you use string trees to achieve a breakover angle off the back side of the nut.
    If the wood is similar, of an amorphous grain (like mahogany) or is tinted in the finish, that join line may be more subtle but it's there.
    Ibanez, Ephiphone, PRS, most of the big names have their guitars made from specific factories they all use. So say, if somebody worked at Ibanez, they'd see the handiwork of all the Asian factories under one label, same with Epiphone. I'd guarantee there is nothing you can find with a one piece neck/headstock with an Epiphone label on the headstock, same for Ibanez, PRS, Yamaha, etc. Many of those guys are made side by side in the Cort or Samick or Peerless factories.
    The Asian (Epi) scarf joins run the peghead into the neck so the join line is visible if you look. The Gibson scarf join runs the neck piece into the peghead piece so that join line is hidden under the peghead veneer. But they're there. It also contributes to the types of breaks that are influenced by the different grain breaks.
    In my opinion

  13. #37

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    I think ill mix some color into the quick set, level it with a taped razor and then do one or two thin coats of the poly before final sanding and polishing. It would take forever to cure that much poly if I used it for the fill job.

  14. #38

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    ^^^ Strike that. I didn't realize you could bring super glue to a glossy polish. And its only in a couple small places that will be under my hand most of the time anyway.

  15. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by BiscoDrew
    ^^^ Strike that. I didn't realize you could bring super glue to a glossy polish. And its only in a couple small places that will be under my hand most of the time anyway.
    Don't glue your fingers to the guitar or you'll have your instrument under your hand a lot longer than you'd want.

  16. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note
    Don't glue your fingers to the guitar or you'll have your instrument under your hand a lot longer than you'd want.
    At this point I wouldn't put it past myself... Thanks for the heads up haha

  17. #41

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    Good news- we're unclamped and SOLID. When I string it back up and get it set up properly I'll post some before and after of my attempt at the refinish.

  18. #42

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    Stage Three:

    I touched up the bare wood with model paint and let dry (two days). Then I filled the chips with superglue and shaved off any prominent excess. There are a couple low spots left that I may hit once more with the cyano and level before final sanding. I went to a hobby shop and got some super super fine sandpaper (I think the max is like 30000...). Just have to stop at the AutoZone for some compound to get it glassy. Ill post some pics of the finished neck when its done!

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  19. #43
    SOLID!! Give yourself a pat on the back. Fine job. And it ALWAYS feels great to play an instrument you've worked on. You OWNED it. Nice work, play it in good health. That guitar owes you one.

  20. #44

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    Stage Four:

    I'm happy with it. I could have sanded and maybe spot filled again, but I would probably do more harm then good, particularly to the surrounding area. Not nearly as "finished" looking as the factory, or even a competent tech, would make it. But It plays, it doesn't feel like splinters and cracks underhand, and most importantly- it doesn't move.

    Thanks for the input and encouragement. Love this forum!

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