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  1. #1

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    I know from some Gretsches that you’ll achieve an at least satisfying intonation from simple uncompensated bar bridges.

    Is it necessary to use a plain-G compensated bridge if you’re playing plain G strings? Will a bridge compensated for a wound G work satisfying if used with a plain G?
    G-string compensation-f570a420-fd64-4575-a39b-88df04f52f45-jpeg
    Here you can see a Guild M-75 with a plain G using a rosewood bridge compensated for a wound G.
    So, what the heck?

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  3. #2

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    No, that's compensated for a plain G. With a wound G, a straight saddle works.

  4. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    No, that's compensated for a plain G. With a wound G, a straight saddle works.
    ???
    G-string compensation-c416dd96-62cd-4c16-a46c-5233548fd1d9-jpeg

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    No, that's compensated for a plain G.
    I don't think so.

  6. #5

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    no a plain g needs the saddle back closer to the tailpiece...


    the guild aristocrat ships with d'addario 11-49's with unwound g...but the bridge pictured in op is for a wound g!....a faux pas

    if you want that bridge to work, use a wound g..it does matter for spot on intonation!

    that's why i mentioned in your ngd aristocrat thread that bigsby makes both..wound g and unwound g bridges!

    cheers

    ps- why tune-a-matics are so popular!!! haha
    Last edited by neatomic; 01-07-2021 at 09:02 PM. Reason: corr-

  7. #6

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    It all depends on the tension of the respective string. If you'd use an unwound g string with approximately the same tension as a wound one you may get away with it.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by TOMMO
    It all depends on the tension of the respective string. If you'd use an unwound g string with approximately the same tension as a wound one you may get away with it.
    I don’t think so. I think given an equal amount of stretch (e.g., due to fretting) a solid core string will go more sharp than a wound string, even if they are at the same tension. I don’t know enough about material physics to prove it at the moment, but I might go down that rabbit hole to see if I can. G-string compensation

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by KirkP
    I don’t think so. I think given an equal amount of stretch (e.g., due to fretting) a solid core string will go more sharp than a wound string, even if they are at the same tension. I don’t know enough about material physics to prove it at the moment, but I might go down that rabbit hole to see if I can. G-string compensation
    As far as I have learned about it is that the tension of a string depends on its gauge (for a plain string) or the core of a wound string. Both being equal tension should be the same or at least very close. Looking forward to what you can find out...

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by TOMMO
    As far as I have learned about it is that the tension of a string depends on its gauge (for a plain string) or the core of a wound string. Both being equal tension should be the same or at least very close. Looking forward to what you can find out...
    I did find this:
    G. Varieschi and C. Gower, “Intonation and compensation of fretted string instruments,” Am. J. Phys. 78 (1), 47-55, January 2010.
    https://digitalcommons.lmu.edu/cgi/v...ntext=phys_fac

    I only skimmed it, but the level of detail in their analysis suggests that compensation is driven by much more than string tension. It seems reasonable to assume that a wound string will respond much differently to stretching than an unwound string, even if set to the same tension. That’s one reason guitarists who want to do wide bends prefer solid core G strings. That’s as far as I’ll go down this rabbit hole today.

  11. #10
    Okay, all in all it‘s best bet to use the matching bridge!

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by KirkP
    I did find this:
    G. Varieschi and C. Gower, “Intonation and compensation of fretted string instruments,” Am. J. Phys. 78 (1), 47-55, January 2010.
    https://digitalcommons.lmu.edu/cgi/v...ntext=phys_fac

    I only skimmed it, but the level of detail in their analysis suggests that compensation is driven by much more than string tension. It seems reasonable to assume that a wound string will respond much differently to stretching than an unwound string, even if set to the same tension. That’s one reason guitarists who want to do wide bends prefer solid core G strings. That’s as far as I’ll go down this rabbit hole today.
    Thanks for your effort - seriously!

  13. #12

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    I generally used a standard compensation bridge that gradually lengthens the string length from 1st to 6th. I don't generally like it when the G is set shorter and I guess I don't run into that one being an issue give I use a wound third. In all the repairs and such I have done it just never seems to make a huge difference. The problem is that just varying the pressure of your finger as you play will change the intonation. The only thing I do notice is that occasionally the 4th string will be a bit flat by 2 cents depending on the strings at the 12t. Does not cause me issues playing but never have figured out why the 4th string at least for my own achtops seems to be the bugger.

    I went from a tunomatic on my Super400ces to an Ebony saddle I carved to my usual stated diagonal line, and it did not change the intonation a bit. Was basically the same as the tunomatic, that was slightly adjusted different. Could be we are trying to spit atoms without a real atom smasher?

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by TOMMO
    It all depends on the tension of the respective string. If you'd use an unwound g string with approximately the same tension as a wound one you may get away with it.
    You'd need a plain G roughly the same diameter as the core of a wound G; it'd be like having a high E in the middle of the guitar.

  15. #14

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    Aristocrats ship with TOMs. That's an aftermarket bridge.

  16. #15

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    BTW, I compensate my G string to the right.






    My inner fourth grader demanded that it be said. I'm not sure that men ever really get out of the fourth grade. I know you were all thinking something along those lines.

  17. #16

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    Aristocrats ship with TOMs. That's an aftermarket bridge.

  18. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by nopedals
    Aristocrats ship with TOMs. That's an aftermarket bridge.
    You‘re wrong, That‘s an american patriarch m-75. They ship with rosewood bridges.

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cunamara
    BTW, I compensate my G string to the right.






    My inner fourth grader demanded that it be said. I'm not sure that men ever really get out of the fourth grade. I know you were all thinking something along those lines.
    Was only a matter of time until somebody posted something along these lines...