1. #1

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    I very recently had an Eastman Pagelli returned to me due to a failed Reverb transaction. The top was apparently compressed or shocked on the return trip back to me and it now suffers from numerous lacquer cracks. The thread describing the situation with photos can be seen here: Guitar Returned from Reverb Buyer with Finish Cracks. Some of the posters have indicated that the cracks can be reduced in appearance with the use of lacquer amalgamator. I was wondering what the process is for doing this. I read on the web that because the crack occurs at the interface between the wood and the lacquer that the crack needs to be opened up from the top of the finish to allow the lacquer amalgamator to seep into the crack and melt the existing lacquer to cause the crack to fade. After allowing time for the melted lacquer to sufficiently cure, the crack depressions are then leveled with more lacquer and then when that has cured enough the finish in that area is buffed out. Is that the general process for doing this kind of repair?

    My other question has to do with cost and the level of restoration expertise to do this sort of thing. Reverb will cover the cost of the repairs and is asking for a luthier estimate. Given the amount of fine work and time required, it would seem to be a rather costly repair that would need to be done by someone who specializes in this kind of thing. Any rough ideas about cost and level of expertise needed are appreciated. I will then seek out an appropriate luthier for the estimate and repair work.

    Thanks!

    Bill

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Here's the process as outlined by Frank Ford:

    FRETS.COM

    Doc

  4. #3

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    contact curt wilson of old school guitar...he's a finish specialist...gets incredible results


    Old School Guitar Repair >> Contact


    cheers

    ps- he's also a member here!

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ol Burns
    Here's the process as outlined by Frank Ford:

    FRETS.COM

    Doc
    Looks like new! Thanks, Doc!

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    contact curt wilson of old school guitar...he's a finish specialist...gets incredible results


    Old School Guitar Repair >> Contact


    cheers

    ps- he's also a member here!
    Thanks, neatomic! Just looked at his website. Some very impressive restorations, like bringing that Heritage Sweet 16 with the adhesion problems back to looking like new. Will check in with him.

  7. #6

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    that Martin in the link had some pretty extensive checking
    no way I'd use that technique on a guitar w/ just a few incidental checks, just imo

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon
    that Martin in the link had some pretty extensive checking
    no way I'd use that technique on a guitar w/ just a few incidental checks, just imo
    Wintermoon, Is this more like what you were thinking of: FRETS.COM

  9. #8

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    Bill, I was referring to the guitar in the link Ol Burns posted--all that lacquering and sanding seems a bit overkill for a guitar like yours. the technique you just linked is less severe but takes up to a month to dry. I'd still just leave it alone and sell the guitar as is, just imo. I don't get people that can't live w/ a few harmless checks, but then again I'm not them.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon
    Bill, I was referring to the guitar in the link Ol Burns posted--all that lacquering and sanding seems a bit overkill for a guitar like yours. the technique you just linked is less severe but takes up to a month to dry. I'd still just leave it alone and sell the guitar as is, just imo. I don't get people that can't live w/ a few harmless checks, but then again I'm not them.
    Thanks, wintermoon. I am not committed to having the repair made. Reverb is offering to cover the repair and is asking me for a luthier estimate. So, I am trying to find someone who is knowledgeable about these kinds of repairs who would be willing to provide a written estimate for Reverb. I will compensate them for the estimate. I did just send Curt a message asking him about the feasibility of the repair and general cost estimate. I am reluctant to send the guitar out anywhere at this point, regardless, because it is obviously fragile given the highly arched, thin top. I am hoping that Reverb will offer the cost of the estimate and some depreciation given the damages. I will then try to sell it locally again at a much lower price reflecting the damage.