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  1. #1

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    another classic luthiers tonewood bites the dust...fender/fmic will no longer be using ash for their production guitars...ash and alder were the 2 fender mainstay body woods for decades!


    statement from Christina Stejksal, Vice President of Global Communications:

    As you know, it has become ever more difficult to obtain a steady and predictable supply of ash over the last several years.

    A major cause of this shortage is the infestation of the Emerald Ash Borer, an invasive beetle native to Asia that is highly destructive to the North American ash tree and the attempts at curbing the beetle’s impact have been largely unsuccessful. Same goes for the compounding of the Emerald Ash Borer and the infestation results in chronic flooding in the Mississippi delta, where the majority of our swamp ash supply is harvested.

    It is inevitable we as an industry and a brand need to make some changes, some proactive changes and what this means exactly for Fender. In order to uphold our legacy of consistency and high quality we have made the decision to remove ash from the majority of our regular production models. What little ash we are able to source will continue to be made available in select, historically appropriate vintage models, as supplies are available.

    This marks the beginning of a new chapter at Fender that will inspire musicians with beautiful new tone wood combinations, new resonant body styles and bold new sounds – as always with our continued commitment to quality and value. With your help, we believe we will continue to achieve unprecedented success together.


    cheers

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    As a community, we really do need to become a lot more welcoming to synthetic materials.

  4. #3

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    i'd much prefer alternate woods to synthetics...synthetics take huge environmental toll too!!

    fmic's move from rosewood fretboards to indian laurel...was a good move..just as the move from mahogany to sapelle...etc etc


    orville gibson carved his first guitar out of walnut!!

    cheers

  5. #4

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    Even though there are to al characteristics to specific types of woods. I'm sure design and luthiers skills have as much to do with producing a great sounding instrument. Didn't Bob Benedetto make an archtop of very cheap wood to prove his point ?

    I wonder how much is the look as well as being conditioned as consumers?

  6. #5

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    Oh great, now everyone who wouldn't THINK of owning a strat or tele are going to gobble what's left of them up and inflate the prices :-(

  7. #6

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    Sad to see. Governments listen to their foresters on about the same level as their epidemiologists, with predictable results.

  8. #7

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    { " A major cause of this shortage is the infestation of the Emerald Ash Borer, an invasive beetle native to Asia.... " }


    ....I hired a tree service last year whose crew worked two days cutting down ash trees in my yard, that'd easily been there for 100 plus years... .....The foreman told me all ash trees in this country are dying and will soon, without doubt, be extinct....

  9. #8

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    btw..."synthetic" material guitars were being made in the 40's and 50's...maccaferri plastic guitars and danelectro masonite


    don't see too much love for them jazzwise these days


    not new or weird enough?

    cheers

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    btw..."synthetic" material guitars were being made in the 40's and 50's...maccaferri plastic guitars and danelectro masonite


    don't see too much love for them jazzwise these days


    not new or weird enough?

    cheers
    I've owned and loved old Danos and I have no doubt that someone will eventually make a brilliant carbon fiber electric, whether anyone will buy it is another story.
    Last edited by Jim Soloway; 04-22-2020 at 08:40 AM.

  11. #10

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    steinberger???


    i also knew geoff gould of modulus guitars a bit..first guy i knew dealing with industrial aeronautics carbon fiber for guitars..the 80's....for all the talk about rigidity and lack of "wooden" problems...they never really took off!!

    carbon steinberger had great run..and in many ways still a great underrated design...all these "modern" headless guitars are basically piggybacking off the original

    cheers

  12. #11

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    They don't sell. The "handle" 2010


  13. #12

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    Always those damn Be(e/a)tles....

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by rob taft
    They don't sell. The "handle" 2010

    They didn't and it's a shame. They weren't perfect ergonomically but I played their jazz version at NAMM and it was stunning. One of the best sounding guitars I've ever played.

  15. #14

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    Just got my 2nd Baja tele a couple of weeks before.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    i'd much prefer alternate woods to synthetics...
    This.

    Love cherry wood.

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Soloway
    As a community, we really do need to become a lot more welcoming to synthetic materials.
    I'm somewhat surprised that engineered materials haven't made many inroads into guitars. Not just "synthetics", though, but also engineered woods and composites. But I guess the R&D effort it would take to come up with something that performs as well as "tone wood" at a comparable cost is not there yet, and/ or the musical instrument business can't compete with other industries for the scientists and engineers who would do it. But if there were a good sounding guitar made out of reclaimed materials at a price I could afford, I'd go for it. FWIW I tried one carbon fiber acoustic guitar (I think it was a Rainsing), and the price:tone ratio was not good IMO. OTOH, I heard a violinist play a CF violin, and it sounded like a violin to me.

    On a parallel note, I find Godin's use of non-traditional woods and novel lamination/design methods pretty interesting. That might be a stepping stone to composites. From what I understand, they sited their factory close to abundant sources of woods that other manufacturers don't use, and put in place sophisticate design, manufacturing QA/QC, and make great stuff cheaply. I bet they're poised to bring in other materials.

    John

  18. #17

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    swamp ash is a beautiful wood!! one piece tele body

    Tone Wood - Fender no Longer Using Ash-cwcim7x-jpg

    cheers

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by John A.
    I'm somewhat surprised that engineered materials haven't made many inroads into guitars. Not just "synthetics", though, but also engineered woods and composites. But I guess the R&D effort it would take to come up with something that performs as well as "tone wood" at a comparable cost is not there yet, and/ or the musical instrument business can't compete with other industries for the scientists and engineers who would do it. But if there were a good sounding guitar made out of reclaimed materials at a price I could afford, I'd go for it. FWIW I tried one carbon fiber acoustic guitar (I think it was a Rainsing), and the price:tone ratio was not good IMO. OTOH, I heard a violinist play a CF violin, and it sounded like a violin to me.

    On a parallel note, I find Godin's use of non-traditional woods and novel lamination/design methods pretty interesting. That might be a stepping stone to composites. From what I understand, they sited their factory close to abundant sources of woods that other manufacturers don't use, and put in place sophisticate design, manufacturing QA/QC, and make great stuff cheaply. I bet they're poised to bring in other materials.

    John
    I think it's much more a case of resistance on the demand side than lack of progress on the supply side.

  20. #19

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    Guitarists- myself included- tend to be conservative to the point of hidebound. But as far as Telecasters and Stratocasters go, I have always preferred alder to ash in terms of tone. I've never played a pinecaster, though.

    The simple truth is that any species of wood that is logged in a wholesale manner will eventually become in short supply. There are billions of people on the planet, most of whom utilize wood in many aspects of their life in one way or another, and that number is only going to keep increasing. That will continue to place demands upon materials and ultimately necessity products, such as structural wood for housing, is going to win out over vanity products like guitars.

    So we are going to have to adapt to engineered materials. For solid body guitars, that really ought to be less problematic than for acoustic instruments. However, it's also possible that there have already been enough guitars made in terms of mass production. Fender and Gibson have always struggled with competing to sell new guitars versus the used instrument market.

  21. #20

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    unfortunately, what makes this current ash problem so insidious is that it is not a matter of over demand or non sustaining proper growth ethics...it's a question of deadly infestation from outside it's natural environment


    much like whats going on at the present moment on larger scale!


    cheers

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    unfortunately, what makes this current ash problem so insidious is that it is not a matter of over demand or non sustaining proper growth ethics...it's a question of deadly infestation from outside it's natural environmentmuch like whats going on at the present moment on larger scale!cheers
    With worldwide travel, illegal export and importation of wood and plant products it's become a problem worldwide. Here in the U.S beside the Emerald Ash Borer the avocado Ambrosia beetle, annona seed borer and citrus greening (caused by the Citrus Psyllid) diseases are some of the other significant non native threats.

    The bigger threat other than tone woods (sorry) is food crops, yeah Avo, and annona may not be life sustaining as we could (but I wouldn't be happy about it) live without these but crops like citrus are another matter.

    I guess it's the price we pay for globalization, but the money spent on treating plant pests is (IMO) better spent on human health I think.

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by GNAPPI
    Here in the U.S beside the Emerald Ash Borer the avocado Ambrosia beetle, annona seed borer and citrus greening (caused by the Citrus Psyllid) diseases are some of the other significant non native threats.
    Don't forget bark beetle and the contribution all those dead trees make to the forest fire problem in the west.


    Quote Originally Posted by GNAPPI
    The bigger threat other than tone woods (sorry) is food crops, yeah Avo, and annona may not be life sustaining as we could (but I wouldn't be happy about it) live without these but crops like citrus are another matter.
    You may not be aware but since the development of Hass avocados in the 1920's native Californians have become dependent on them and can't survive longer than 15 days without avocado. California has even considered social programs to provide these life sustaining avocados to those who can prove their California origins.

  24. #23

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    When I was growing up we had a giant American Elm tree in our back yard, in a NYC suburb. Dutch Elm disease killed it, and wiped out most elms on the eastern seaboard. There is a stand of old growth elm in Central Park, thought to have survived DED because it is isolated in an urban setting.

    Chestnut trees in North America have also been devastated by disease, in this case Chestnut Blight. There aren't many chestnut trees to see in this patch of the US; it is almost gone from its historical native habitat. Both of these tree species were noted for their huge, spreading crowns – magnificent specimens. Remember, the "village smithy" stood under a "spreading chestnut tree"...

    A number of tree species may fall victim to various beetles and other insects due to global warming, as the frostline in the northern hemisphere moves farther up wooded mountains.

  25. #24

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    Seems like that with all the dead ash trees, there would be plenty of material. At least for now. It would probably more profitable to use the last of it for baseball bats, though.

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by MaxTwang
    Don't forget bark beetle and the contribution all those dead trees make to the forest fire problem in the west.




    You may not be aware but since the development of Hass avocados in the 1920's native Californians have become dependent on them and can't survive longer than 15 days without avocado. California has even considered social programs to provide these life sustaining avocados to those who can prove their California origins.
    Banning avocado tree ownership gets very complicated in countries where gun ownership is legal
    Hey don't blame me for getting political if gonna you mock the life style choices is of people in liberal states.

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ukena
    When I was growing up we had a giant American Elm tree in our back yard, in a NYC suburb. Dutch Elm disease killed it, and wiped out most elms on the eastern seaboard. There is a stand of old growth elm in Central Park, thought to have survived DED because it is isolated in an urban setting.

    Chestnut trees in North America have also been devastated by disease, in this case Chestnut Blight. There aren't many chestnut trees to see in this patch of the US; it is almost gone from its historical native habitat. Both of these tree species were noted for their huge, spreading crowns – magnificent specimens. Remember, the "village smithy" stood under a "spreading chestnut tree"...

    A number of tree species may fall victim to various beetles and other insects due to global warming, as the frostline in the northern hemisphere moves farther up wooded mountains.
    If by 'global warming', you mean that beetles originating from the Netherlands attached themselves to ships and cargo bound for the US and decimated the Elm tree in the process, and if you also mean that ash borers native to Asia also attached themselves to US bound ships and decimated the US ash population, then yes global warming is responsible.
    However, I think it's pretty safe to say a 3 degree temperature increase wouldn't and didn't matter much to ash borers and elm beetles attaching themselves to these ships and cargo.
    And any temperature increase isn't mattering much now either as invasive species are still attaching themselves to ships - (Asian carp in the Great Lakes).

    Just MHO

  28. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    swamp ash is a beautiful wood!! one piece tele body

    Tone Wood - Fender no Longer Using Ash-cwcim7x-jpg

    cheers
    Man, that is a beauty. So cool to see how the grain on the butt hits the top.

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis D
    However, I think it's pretty safe to say a 3 degree temperature increase wouldn't and didn't matter much to ash borers and elm beetles attaching themselves to these ships and cargo.
    And any temperature increase isn't mattering much now either as invasive species are still attaching themselves to ships
    This is not to what I was referring. From this article, here is relevant information:

    “For mountain pine beetle, which is the most damaging of the bark beetle species in western North America, we expect warming to reduce beetle mortality during wintertime,” Hicke says.
    Warming also speeds up the development of insects so that more generations of the beetles can be born each year. And like something out of a horror movie, when more beetles emerge at the same time, they can mount mass attacks that overwhelm a tree’s natural defenses.

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis D
    However, I think it's pretty safe to say a 3 degree temperature increase wouldn't and didn't matter much to ash borers and elm beetles attaching themselves to these ships and cargo.
    Really? Currently observed temperature change is way less than 3 degrees actually. 3 degrees would be extremely disastrous based on the scientific understanding of how climate and ecosystem works.

    But I always wonder when people imply things like 3 degrees is not much temperature increase, what their intuition about the workings of climate and ecosystem is based on. Like how much would be too much? 70? Is that because it feels too hot to touch?

  31. #30

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    Whatever the worldwide temperature may or may not be, and my admittedly incorrect 3 degree reference, my point was and is that attaching Dutch Elm and Ash extinction to the concept of global warming is a fallacy. The borers and mites that have wiped out the NA Elm and Ash are not native to NA, and if they'd been contained at the point of origin, ( regardless of the temperature at that location) would not have done the damage they've done.

    So how'd they get here ? The same way the Asian carp are getting here now.

  32. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Soloway
    . . . I have no doubt that someone will eventually make a brilliant carbon fiber electric, whether anyone will buy it is another story.
    Most of these aren't carbon fiber, and they're not 'electric.' But every one is synthetic and they've been selling by the bucketload for decades.

    Last edited by Sam Sherry; 04-23-2020 at 04:13 PM.

  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Sherry
    Most of these aren't carbon fiber but they're all synthetic and they've been selling by the bucketload for years.


    I tried using one for a while. They play great, sound great, but I just could not hold onto it. And my right sleeve would catch on those controls on the lower bout.

  34. #33

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    I dunno. Pretty happy with my carbon fiber electric. I’d take it over any 330 or Casino any day. But that’s the advantage of rolling your own. The specs I want. 4lbs, 25” scale, compound radius, 1-3/4” nut.




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  35. #34

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    PS: The atmosphere is more akin to a pot of boiling water. Turn up the heat and a boiling pot stays the same temperature but becomes more violent.

    The analogy is not perfect. The atmosphere does warm some, but the vast majority of the energy goes into “bubbles” of drought, flooding rains, hurricanes and tornadoes. But because of that, the amount of energy needed to raise the atmosphere 3 degrees is staggering.

    It would take roughly 18,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 Joules to raise the atmosphere by 3 degrees. That is the equivalent of roughly 4,000,000 nuclear explosions a year, or about 8 every minute of the day, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

    So, yeah. 3 degrees would be cataclysmic. If scientist had expressed global climate change in terms of nuclear bombs instead of degrees, maybe we wouldn’t still have people thinking it’s no big deal.


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  36. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by rlrhett
    I dunno. Pretty happy with my carbon fiber electric. I’d take it over any 330 or Casino any day. But that’s the advantage of rolling your own. The specs I want. 4lbs, 25” scale, compound radius, 1-3/4” nut.
    Wow! Your guitars are beautiful! Carbon fiber top, lovely wood for back & sides...

    And those specs work for me. Love the headstock logo, too.

  37. #36

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    unfortunately carbon fiber is an oil derived byproduct, that is not biodegradable or easy to break down...it carries a huge environmental impact...

    natures wood on the other hand...


    cheers

  38. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by rlrhett
    I dunno. Pretty happy with my carbon fiber electric. I’d take it over any 330 or Casino any day. But that’s the advantage of rolling your own. The specs I want. 4lbs, 25” scale, compound radius, 1-3/4” nut.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    Have you done any CF necks and/or fingerboards

  39. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    unfortunately carbon fiber is an oil derived byproduct, that is not biodegradable or easy to break down...it carries a huge environmental impact...

    natures wood on the other hand...


    cheers
    Wood is harvested in much of the world in ways that have extremely serious environmental impacts (e.g., clear cutting old growth forests). This, in combination with deforestation for reasons other than lumber extraction (e.g., burning down the Amazon rain forest for development and cattle-grazing land) are why wood species are dying out (ash aside), and are good reasons to rethink using wood instruments. Guitars are a very small part of the reason wood is extracted, but it's not a bad place to start, especially if the alternative materials are mainly recycled/reclaimed.

    John

  40. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Soloway
    Have you done any CF necks and/or fingerboards
    No. For two reasons:

    CF is not abrasion resistant. I can only imagine that Emerald protects their fretboards under a coat of hard epoxy, but I don’t know. Saturated fiber is euphemistically said to “sand well”, which in my experience means it disintegrates like an 8 year old bully who gets a punch in the nose.

    Second is that I don’t like the feel of CF on playing surfaces. I don’t like a glossy poly finish on necks for the same reason. So no CF neck for me. I’ve never played a CF fingerboard, but the idea of a thick epoxy gloss fingerboard does not appeal to me either.

    So, for now, I use traditional neck construction. Usually maple, but I like cherry too. I’ve used sycamore and like the look A LOT, but it isn’t very dent resistant.

    I am considering making a neck that is mostly hollowed out with CF on the inside. Super rigid and light but with the feel of wood under your hand. There was a luthier named Bob Garish who posted some necks he did that way. I think Ken Parker does something similar. It’ll probably take a few before I dial that in. With all this lockdown business, I’m back to indulging in extreme experiments. :-D


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  41. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    unfortunately carbon fiber is an oil derived byproduct, that is not biodegradable or easy to break down...it carries a huge environmental impact...

    natures wood on the other hand...


    cheers
    I am way more conflicted about the rosewood and ebony trim I use than the 500g of carbon fiber. The indiscriminate destruction of jungle habitats so I can have nice dark fingerboard is a real problem I haven’t found and answer to.

    I don’t know how much fossil fuels it takes to cut a tree down in Canada, ship it hundreds of miles to a mill, ship that thousands of miles to Southern California, only to have me drive a truck 20 miles to get a rough milled stick or two. But my guess is that there is more fossil fuel in that than making 500g of Carbon Fiber and shipping it to me.

    Still, no one is arguing this is a green object. The CF is encased in fossil fuel resin to give it rigidity and the whole guitar was sprayed a thin layer of nitrocellulose lacquer. It’s not radio active, but it ain’t an Earth Day tribute either.


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  42. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by rlrhett
    No. For two reasons:

    CF is not abrasion resistant. I can only imagine that Emerald protects their fretboards under a coat of hard epoxy, but I don’t know. Saturated fiber is euphemistically said to “sand well”, which in my experience means it disintegrates like an 8 year old bully who gets a punch in the nose.

    Second is that I don’t like the feel of CF on playing surfaces. I don’t like a glossy poly finish on necks for the same reason. So no CF neck for me. I’ve never played a CF fingerboard, but the idea of a thick epoxy gloss fingerboard does not appeal to me either.

    So, for now, I use traditional neck construction. Usually maple, but I like cherry too. I’ve used sycamore and like the look A LOT, but it isn’t very dent resistant.

    I am considering making a neck that is mostly hollowed out with CF on the inside. Super rigid and light but with the feel of wood under your hand. There was a luthier named Bob Garish who posted some necks he did that way. I think Ken Parker does something similar. It’ll probably take a few before I dial that in. With all this lockdown business, I’m back to indulging in extreme experiments. :-D


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    Playing with big frets, light strings, very few bends and a very light touch, I don't actually touch the fingerboard enough to really care about the feel of the surface.

  43. #42

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    always befuddled by these all or nothing responses...

    as i writ above i'm in favor of alternate sustainable woods...which are available!!!...paulownia wood has been used in japanese furniture making and instrument making for centuries is fast growing (grows 7 feet in a year) and sustainable...as are xmas pine and fir tree plantations!!!..hemp!!...etc etc

    & in the long run they return to dust

    carbon fiber will not!!


    i have seen century old violins up close...no problems...but a guitar made in the 1950's with plastic binding or celluloid pickguards gassing wreak all sorts of havoc!!


    don't confuse the method of extraction with the product itself

    wood has been used by man since time immemorial...we are buried in wooden caskets! ashes to ashes


    oil and its byproducts are a relatively recent development by compare..and have caused far far more devastation

    lastly, the amazon is not being decimated for its trees..its being cleared to graze cattle!!!..for hamburgers!




    cheers

  44. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    always befuddled by these all or nothing responses...

    as i writ above i'm in favor of alternate sustainable woods...which are available!!!...paulownia wood has been used in japanese furniture making and instrument making for centuries is fast growing (grows 7 feet in a year) and sustainable...as are xmas pine and fir tree plantations!!!..hemp!!...etc etc

    & in the long run they return to dust

    carbon fiber will not!!


    i have seen century old violins up close...no problems...but a guitar made in the 1950's with plastic binding or celluloid pickguards gassing wreak all sorts of havoc!!


    don't confuse the method of extraction with the product itself

    wood has been used by man since time immemorial...we are buried in wooden caskets! ashes to ashes


    oil and its byproducts are a relatively recent development by compare..and have caused far far more devastation

    lastly, the amazon is not being decimated for its trees..its being cleared to graze cattle!!!..for hamburgers!




    cheers
    I do agree. My objective is just to have a guitar that survives this insane climate. It's REALLY hard on wood guitars (skin and nails too). I think another alternative to synthetics is roasted woods but I'm still looking into that.

  45. #44

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    look into paulownia...kiri..empress wood...all names for same wood...used traditionally in japanese furniture & koto(harp) making..extremely bug and mold resistant...it's said that items stored in kiri wood tansu's (cabinets) would last despite whatever conditions existed outside...extremely high burning point as well..a great wood.. and light as a feather...like balsa...

    but relatively unknown...some cheaper guitar bodies are currently made of it...but nothing to really show it's attributes!

    cheers

    ps- one of the traditional ways to finish kiri wood kotos was to seal it with a hot flat iron...it sealed and brought out the wood grain patterns at the same time!!!..there's much we can still learn from the old masters!

  46. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    look into paulownia...kiri..empress wood...all names for same wood...used traditionally in japanese furniture & koto(harp) making..extremely bug and mold resistant...it's said that items stored in kiri wood tansu's (cabinets) would last despite whatever conditions existed outside...extremely high burning point as well..a great wood.. and light as a feather...like balsa...

    but relatively unknown...some cheaper guitar bodies are currently made of it...but nothing to really show it's attributes!

    cheers

    ps- one of the traditional ways to finish kiri wood kotos was to seal it with a hot flat iron...it sealed and brought out the wood grain patterns at the same time!!!..there's much we can still learn from the old masters!
    My problems are not with the bodies but with the necks and especially fingerboards. The humidity the other day was 3% and in December there can be 50 degree swings from early morning to mid afternoon and in about 6 weeks the humidity is going to go up to about 85% for two months.

  47. #46

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    funny you should mention...but i just yesterday watched film about carmine street nyc -rick kelly guitars, who i knew & respected...his specialty is using reclaimed woods from old nyc landmark buildings...so he has chelsea hotel guitars..and old roaring 20's speakeasy guitars and mcsorleys bar guitars...all with old old reclaimed wood...in older days he'd sand it pretty clean...but these days he just leaves all the imperfections and artifacts..pretty cool

    at one point in film (which is worth seeing) he's asked what type of fretboard he prefers..and he says rosewood (my fave as well) and he said, ebony fretboard being a harder wood reacts to temp changes with maple neck differently than rosewood..and causes havoc..i totally get it...so perhaps there's more to your neck problems than meets the eye..reconsider!!

    coastal bay area can get 30 degree daily temp changes regularly... always with trussrod wrench in hand!!! haha

    kelly-mcsorley wainscotting guitar-

    Tone Wood - Fender no Longer Using Ash-wxt-2lry_400x400-jpg

    cheers

  48. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    always befuddled by these all or nothing responses...

    as i writ above i'm in favor of alternate sustainable woods...which are available!!!...paulownia wood has been used in japanese furniture making and instrument making for centuries is fast growing (grows 7 feet in a year) and sustainable...as are xmas pine and fir tree plantations!!!..hemp!!...etc etc

    & in the long run they return to dust

    carbon fiber will not!!


    i have seen century old violins up close...no problems...but a guitar made in the 1950's with plastic binding or celluloid pickguards gassing wreak all sorts of havoc!!


    don't confuse the method of extraction with the product itself

    wood has been used by man since time immemorial...we are buried in wooden caskets! ashes to ashes


    oil and its byproducts are a relatively recent development by compare..and have caused far far more devastation

    lastly, the amazon is not being decimated for its trees..its being cleared to graze cattle!!!..for hamburgers!




    cheers
    I don't see how you can separate the material from how it's extracted or manufactured if the subject is environmental impacts (which it seemed to be from you comment about biodegradeability of wood). If you're referring to my comment, I wasn't making an all or nothing point. I was just noting that biodegradeability is only one environmental factor to consider. Not discounting it, just saying that it's not clear to me that wood is better environmentally than something petrochemical like CF/Epoxy composites. I'd actually rather see an instrument made from recycled/reclaimed materials, or something like an engineered wood pulp product, since I think that's more sustainable than anything made from a virgin materials.

    John

  49. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Soloway
    My problems are not with the bodies but with the necks and especially fingerboards. The humidity the other day was 3% and in December there can be 50 degree swings from early morning to mid afternoon and in about 6 weeks the humidity is going to go up to about 85% for two months.
    Jim, don’t you own an Emerald? How are you getting on with it? Has it solved your stability problems? Does it fill your creative needs as well?


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  50. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by rlrhett
    Jim, don’t you own an Emerald? How are you getting on with it? Has it solved your stability problems? Does it fill your creative needs as well?


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    Two. I get along with them just fine. They're by far the most stable guitars I've ever owned. They fill some of my creative wants but there's always going to be a place in my heart for a straight electric guitar. I've been playing them my entire life. Right now I'm using the one we built that I've had for 10 years or so. So far it's holding up ok but given what I've seen here with other guitars and it's importance to me, I'm really nervous about it.

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    Eh, there are a gagillion ash teles and strats in this world. Anybody who really wants one can find one.

    That will be true for the foreseeable future.