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  1. #1

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    I don't think that's a result from the accident ... Rather it's about ageing and living in very different climatic zones. So it had been like that before the accident.
    As a result the octaves were not so good but tolerable ...

    How would you approach this?
    Is there anything that can be done to fix the separation from the rod at the necks end?
    Or would you just re glue it back as it was?
    (yes, I'd be able to do that just fine, with hide glue and everything ...)

    The guitar is not of huge value, a late 50's model made in germany, but very well sounding and feeling, beloved. The original neck came off a long time ago, before I got it, and was replaced with a neck from Höfner (the name [and get that] was "everstraight"])

    A fall parted body from neck and showed that truss rod is off ...-img_3252-jpgA fall parted body from neck and showed that truss rod is off ...-img_3251-jpgA fall parted body from neck and showed that truss rod is off ...-img_3254-jpg

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  3. #2
    One week & a hundred views later and no comment. Is it that difficult?

    Anyway. I glued it back together today.
    I loosened the truss rod a bit, so that it's tight but without executing a lot of pressure.
    Looking good. The intonation is better than before ...

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by ctrlzjones
    How would you approach this?
    Is there anything that can be done to fix the separation from the rod at the necks end?
    Or would you just re glue it back as it was?
    from what I see, it would be necessary, in addition to glue to keep the wood torn, to put a metal bracelet of low thickness, preferably welded. Only a luthier can do that, or come up with another solution. I don't think the glue alone lasts long
    to give an idea, like plumber

  5. #4

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    I would add that in these cases, we should not hesitate to use the great means, even if it is not very beautiful. One day, by tuning my archtop with stronger gauge strings, she blew me up in the face. The luthier repaired the tailpiece with a machined piece of brass, screwed into the neck, since it crosses the body and carries the pickup, for better acoustic rendering



    you can see my signature, with my initials CJP S my surname Sheep, a shape of jazz guitar, which I drew with Bic pen, and which was engraved in the mother-of-pearl on a form that I had also drawn

  6. #5

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    I had no idea a neck could come off in that way, and so cleanly too. That must have been a really nasty surprise.

    Okay, first: I've 0 practical experience, but an old musicshop owner and instrument repairman told me that wood glued back together with real horseglue (from hoof shavings) would _never_ come apart again accidentally. So: what if you placed a thin flat piece of metal over where the trussrod escapes, and then glued the lot back? That should hold, no?

    Patlotch: how would you fit those hoseclamps in there?

  7. #6

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    It appears that just regluing the center strip should take care of the problem. It's impossible to tell the condition of the wood from just a picture, though. That dark staining around the end could be an issue, or not. I can't tell if it's from water, oil, or what. Assuming the integrity is not compromised, it appears that a simple glue job with a clamp should be sufficient. I have no idea what Patlotch is talking about, unless it's using pipe clamps during the drying. There are far better types of clamps to hold things in place while the glue dries, and nothing will work when the neck is replaced.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zina
    wood glued back together with real horseglue (from hoof shavings) would _never_ come apart again accidentally.
    not in this case, the broken part is too thin. It is, in my humble opinion, a manufacturing defect. I'm not surprised it broke

    Quote Originally Posted by Zina
    Patlotch: how would you fit those hoseclamps in there?
    I think of the bracelet part only, not the screw adjustment system. That's why I'm talking about welding it. But you need special tools to hold the bracelet tight during welding. The photo was only to make the idea understand

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    I have no idea what Patlotch is talking about
    of a metal necklace, the photos were only to make it clear, it's missed

    the more I look at this neck, the more I see a real problem of lutherie design, if only in the transmission of sound, why such a decrease in thickness? A trussrod is usually in full thickness of wood, am I wrong? I don't see the type of attachment to the body, it intrigues me

    I see other solutions, but as I'm already ridiculous, isn't it, it will wait for my rating to go back at box office

  10. #9

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    Welding on wood? Seriously? How would you prevent the neck from burning up? Welding metal requires a temperature far above the combustion point of wood. And what is the welded metal supposed to do? If I understand you, you want to disable the truss rod adjustment by welding more metal to it. I don't believe that would help. The wooden center strip should be sufficient, because it will be supported by the wood underneath it when it is reinstalled.

  11. #10

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    If it were mine, I'd be excited about a NGD post here in the near future!

  12. #11

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    the tension from the trussrod caused it to break through..i too question whether just gluing will be enough to hold it in the future...understand what patlotch is saying about the wood being too thin to hold the force of the rod..not a great design...

    also agree that some sort of overlay or band perpendicular to the break woud help...over the glued break..but don't know off hand how that could be accomplished efficiently

    cheers
    Last edited by neatomic; 02-17-2020 at 07:05 PM. Reason: sp-

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    the tension from the trussrod caused it to break through..i too question whether just gluing will be enough to hold it in the future...understand what patloch is saying about the wood being too thin to hold the force of the rod..not a great design...

    also agree that some sort of overlay or band perpendicular to the break woud help...over the glued break..but don't know off hand how that could be accomplished efficiently
    thank you Neatomic, I feel less ridiculous. I thought it might make sense to put perpendicular wooden studs, or screws up the neck and stick it, but it would no longer be removable. Anyway, it's a precise job of luthier with the right tools

    see Repairing a Broken Taylor Neck



    The breaks were all pretty clean with minimal splintering which allowed the jagged bits to lock back together like puzzle pieces, for the most part. I decided to add some 1/8? wood dowels in addition to the factory dowels to further reinforce the neck heel and keep the glue joint from sliding under clamping pressure. First, I drilled 1/8? holes into one side and inserted some specialized indexing punches to mark the mating surface.



  14. #13

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    well, I said a stupidity, the trussrod is not drowned in the wood, which is not too thin, there's nothing, it comes to the flower of the surface, we see it well in this photo



    So it is stuck/tight when you put the handle, it's really a weird construction from the point of view of mechanical tensions. But I don't know anything about it, maybe it's common

  15. #14

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    I am completely lost on this thread cannot follow a thing. Did the op get the guitar and neck back together?

  16. #15

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    it's actually two separate issues...first the neck came off...secondly the trussrod has broken through the wood on the neck...(which is probably why the neck came off!!)...the trussrod issue has to be solved first..then the reattaching of the neck to the body should be fairly straightforward

    the issue is how to keep the trussrod from cracking through the necks wood again...obviously the trussrod channel doesn't have enough wood around it on that side to counterbalance the force of the rod...some kind of reinforcement is called for...then when that's all done..it can be glued to body per normal


    the staining is probably from oiling the trussrod nut...as the crack has probably been there awhile, rendering the trussrod less useful and requiring some trussrod nut adjustments

    that type of trussrod was used on quite a few european made guitars..eko/vox had same style


    cheers

  17. #16

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    That's such a clean break where the truss rod was inserted it looks like it was cut.

    The glue will either hold or it won't. I'll bet it does.


  18. #17

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    Well one approach would be to glue all underneith the neck a maple plate the same size as the neck tongue where the truss rod popped up. That of course will through putting the neck back on as it exactly but there may be a work around on that issue. The plate glued back on should give stability and it does not have to be thick but solid.A bit of creativity and putting the neck back on and it will work.

  19. #18
    Boys, now I get how this forum works: you have to wait one week and then post another message and then you´ll get the answers you have been waiting for one week. So thank you. Thing is that it's too late. The neck and the body have been happily re-married yesterday. Let's see for how long season 3 is continuing to work out.

    And for the curious: As I said in my original post, the neck is not the original one. It came on many many moons ago, in a time when the object of desire was not yet in my hands. So I don't know exactly what has happened then. What I suppose is that the other neck, the then new neck, was to thick at the and that had to fit to the body and so the not-so-smart, ejem, luthier took off so much wood that it could fit in the space where it should go. Unfortunately that was so much that the end of the truss rod came out over time and the resulting pressure against the top of the body made the joint of the neck loosen up and finally put neck and body apart. Funny that it took ˜30 years to do so ...

    Quote Originally Posted by deacon Mark
    Well one approach would be to glue all underneith the neck a maple plate the same size as the neck tongue where the truss rod popped up. That of course will through putting the neck back on as it exactly but there may be a work around on that issue. The plate glued back on should give stability and it does not have to be thick but solid.A bit of creativity and putting the neck back on and it will work.
    Thank you for your comment. Unfortunately this will not be possible because of the very little space (one or two hairs) being left between the end of the neck and top of the body. It would not be a good idea as it would re-instate the old problem that took body and neck apart.

    I wish all of you happy playing and happy fixing things

  20. #19

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    This forum generates a lot of posts. When I scan it while drinking my morning coffee I may miss some threads that are actually interessting. I usually start my clicking the "New Posts" button, so recent posts are at the top and easier to see sometimes. Posting replies bumps the thread and makes it more likely that someone will read it. I saw the original thread, but decided to refrain from replying and allow someone with more experience with that type of repair to come in, but then forgot about it. Sometimes you get answers immediately, sometimes you have to bump a time or two. Using an interesting title seems to help.

  21. #20
    Nothing wrong. Thank you and all the others for your interest & reading & writing.

  22. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Patlotch
    I would add that in these cases, we should not hesitate to use the great means, even if it is not very beautiful. One day, by tuning my archtop with stronger gauge strings, she blew me up in the face. The luthier repaired the tailpiece with a machined piece of brass, screwed into the neck, since it crosses the body and carries the pickup, for better acoustic rendering



    you can see my signature, with my initials CJP S my surname Sheep, a shape of jazz guitar, which I drew with Bic pen, and which was engraved in the mother-of-pearl on a form that I had also drawn
    That fat screw is not going through the top is it?
    I understand that there is a piece of metal under the tailpiece that is hold by the little screws around it?
    And it is really better resonating that way?
    Also the bridge looks bent too on the deep E side and sustained with another nail?
    Last edited by ctrlzjones; 02-19-2020 at 04:28 PM.

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Patlotch
    I would add that in these cases, we should not hesitate to use the great means, even if it is not very beautiful. One day, by tuning my archtop with stronger gauge strings, she blew me up in the face. The luthier repaired the tailpiece with a machined piece of brass, screwed into the neck, since it crosses the body and carries the pickup, for better acoustic rendering



    you can see my signature, with my initials CJP S my surname Sheep, a shape of jazz guitar, which I drew with Bic pen, and which was engraved in the mother-of-pearl on a form that I had also drawn
    Could that bass E-string have anything to do with neck issues?

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Betz
    Could that bass E-string have anything to do with neck issues?
    Two different guitars.