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  1. #1

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    I'm getting a solid body with a Faber compensated wraparound. It looks to me like the B string slot was cut off center. Is it best to through the bridge away or can some solder be used to fill the slot and a new one cut? Thanks for any help.

    Wraparound bridge fix- help!-2019-10-21-14_31_33-0332-legend-_-cp-thornton-guitars-jpgWraparound bridge fix- help!-2019-10-21-14_30_18-0332-legend-_-cp-thornton-guitars-jpgWraparound bridge fix- help!-2019-10-21-14_31_07-0332-legend-_-cp-thornton-guitars-jpg
    MG

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  3. #2

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    Actually, it looks like it hasn't been notched at all. Hmm.
    MG

  4. #3

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    do a close shot from directly above it

  5. #4

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    I don't have it yet but the bridge doesn't look slotted.
    MG

  6. #5

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    Looks to me like the strings were put on badly. The high E has a definite angle to it. Assuming the through-holes were properly spaced, that wouldn't happen.

    You'll know more with the piece in hand. All the strings are exhibiting spacing issues (one of my beefs with Bigsbys). This occurs with top-wrapping stop-bars as well. I keep a collection of popsicle sticks to nudge the strings into line.
    Best regards, k

  7. #6

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    You might try contacting Faber for guidance. Their support link is at the bottom of the page in this link.

    Buy Faber Tone Lock Bridge | Faber Bridges at Faber USA

  8. #7

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    I screwed this thread up. I assumed the bridge must be notched. It isn't. String spacing is whatever you want it to be with this Faber Compensated Wraparound.

    Like most things on a guitar, people will have varying opinions. I have found the sustain to be fine without notching. Intonation is good with a plain G.
    MG

  9. #8

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    well faber sells them un-notched so they can be used on a variety of guitars...but unlike with wooden saddles where the string will eventually cut its own groove...metal strings on metal saddles tend to slip around...why the pics of the guitar alarmed you in the first place...expect that to continue...even if the saddle length is correct..the strings will slip from side to side when playing...ideally, a slight notch should be cut..a guide if nothing else..otherwise be prepared for the strings to slide sideways...

    tailpiece/bridges are a different animal...they have their own idiosyncrasies to begin with!!..lateral movement just worsens the possibilities

    cheers

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic View Post
    well faber sells them un-notched so they can be used on a variety of guitars...but unlike with wooden saddles where the string will eventually cut its own groove...metal strings on metal saddles tend to slip around...why the pics of the guitar alarmed you in the first place...expect that to continue...even if the saddle length is correct..the strings will slip from side to side when playing...ideally, a slight notch should be cut..a guide if nothing else..otherwise be prepared for the strings to slide sideways...

    tailpiece/bridges are a different animal...they have their own idiosyncrasies to begin with!!..lateral movement just worsens the possibilities

    cheers

    Thanks.

    I can notch it.
    MG

  11. #10

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    Wraparound bridges such as the one pictured do not need, and should not have notches.

    When you string up the guitar, just make sure the strings are spaced correctly. When the strings are tight, they will not move at the bridge. I've owned a bunch of guitars with this bridge and a lack of notches has never been a problem.

    If you attempt to notch a bridge like this, you'll be introducing new problems and will probably ruin the bridge.