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  1. #26

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    The only obvious reason is inferior quality control for the metal composition. Not saying that is the reason, but I can’t see another one that makes sense.

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  3. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by lammie200
    The only obvious reason is inferior quality control for the metal composition. Not saying that is the reason, but I can’t see another one that makes sense.
    This is exactly why I tell them never to keep the large bags of french fries near the vats of molten alloy....

  4. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by jjang1993
    How much would these protocols go in the long haul in preventing this from happening again to this extent and/or this early on?
    1. Washing my hands with dawn dish soap before I play.
    2. Wiping the strings and frets down between songs on a gig.
    3. Wiping the entire area of the string after I'm done playing.
    4. Wiping down each fret after I'm done playing.
    5. Cycling through 4 different T-shirts every 2-3 days for wiping purposes.

    I'll be sure to keep everyone in the loop with these developments with me being 1 of the 3 people known so far to burn through these EVO frets like the Alien blood burning through steel hulls that you see in that sci-fi series.
    1. Washing my hands with dawn dish soap before I play.

    That will help a lot; you should already have this habit.


    2. Wiping the strings and frets down between songs on a gig.
    3. Wiping the entire area of the string after I'm done playing.
    4. Wiping down each fret after I'm done playing.
    5. Cycling through 4 different T-shirts every 2-3 days for wiping purposes.

    Here is what I suggest... get a nylon carpet sample and cut a piece to fit in your case under the head stock, always ready.

    The advantage of the carpet sample is that it has some depth to it and will truly scrub the finger board and frets, and strings, including under the strings. A good full scrub is about 50 strokes from nut to bridge and back, about 30 seconds, which is what you want to do after you have played and are putting the guitar away.

    When you are getting the guitar out to play, it should be clean already, and the half dozen stokes then really serve to warm up the strings before checking tuning. The carpet sample is going to be about 4" x 4" and easy to set on you amp or fold and put in your back pocket, so you can give the strings a quick half dozen strokes between tunes.

    Before it gets too cruddy, cut another fresh piece and discard the old one.

    When I change strings I apply ChapStick to the finger board and then wipe it with the carpet sample, which leaves a little in the carpet. This seems to make it more effective for keeping the strings, frets, and finger board clean (ChapStick is waxy, not oily; it wipes off easy and the trace left has a natural feel).

    Using this approach my strings stay as shiny as new, and the limiting factor is that eventually the notch wear of the string to fret contacts causes a sufficient anomaly in the consistency of the strings to start becoming audible... they will eventually start to sound bad while still looking and feeling like new.

  5. #29

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    I don't know if it was mentioned but if the OP keeps the guitar in its case that may be the culprit. Someone may have applied something to the padding in the case that caused the degradation of the frets. It makes sense since the degradation is between the strings and very even. Maybe something like Lysol residue would cause this?

  6. #30

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    Man - that's a lot of work frets .

    Send a picture and quick description of problem to Jeff Silver ask if he can help or have your installer send it.

  7. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by lammie200
    I don't know if it was mentioned but if the OP keeps the guitar in its case that may be the culprit. Someone may have applied something to the padding in the case that caused the degradation of the frets. It makes sense since the degradation is between the strings and very even. Maybe something like Lysol residue would cause this?
    Yeah, now that you mention it, the amazing regularity of the degradation does suggest that something was "all over the finger board" and it wasn't fingers, looks like something else like case top padding... good clue!

  8. #32

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    It would also explain the spacing of the divots. My guess is that someone either put something on the case padding or the chemical they used to polish the frets wasn’t properly wiped off the frets and it transferred to the padding. The chemical was harsh enough to degrade the frets.

  9. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by lammie200
    It would also explain the spacing of the divots. My guess is that someone either put something on the case padding or the chemical they used to polish the frets wasn’t properly wiped off the frets and it transferred to the padding. The chemical was harsh enough to degrade the frets.
    Is the pattern on ALL the frets? Or just a certain area?

  10. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woody Sound
    Is the pattern on ALL the frets? Or just a certain area?
    You would have the ask the OP. I am only arm chair quarterbacking on this.

  11. #35

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    This guitar has been in my customer's hands for 4 years and 8 months:

    EVO Gold Frets Corroding-img_20190716_140850-jpg

    I'm not sure yet what we will do about it. Stainless I suppose.

  12. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by michmcca
    This guitar has been in my customer's hands for 4 years and 8 months:

    EVO Gold Frets Corroding-img_20190716_140850-jpg

    I'm not sure yet what we will do about it. Stainless I suppose.
    Interesting- this appears to be wearing more like Nickel Silver frets right ?

  13. #37

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    This is 47104-EVO fret wire direct from Jescar.

    The player also has an L5 with nickel silver frets of similar size, and they don't look like this at all. Those frets show normal wear under the strings.

    The EVO frets are corroded wherever his fingers touch them a lot, but there is not much wear under the strings. The remarkable thing is that the guitar plays and sounds great. However, I'm concerned that the current playability will not last for long if the corrosion continues unabated.

  14. #38

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    A luthier said they wear great ( EVO Gold ) even on the GJ Guitars (GJ Players are murder on frets apparently ) ..so surprised when I hear these stories sometimes- I wonder if occasionally there is a slightly odd small batch of wire ?

  15. #39

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    Just an observation and it was brought up earlier. There are only 5 points of wear. Hence the wear is happening in between the strings - not where you would expect to see wear. I am convinced that (unless this guitar sat outside its case for all the time that these frets wore down) it is something in the case fur that is causing corrosion, not wear. I am guessing that there is not a lot of gold in gold EVO frets. Pure gold is pretty durable. It would be interesting to see if these frets polish up consistently because it appears as though a plating has corroded away. If they don't polish up that would be more evidence of corrosion and not actual playing wear.

  16. #40

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    EVO gold is a an allow reportedly made up of copper, tin, iron, and titanium. There is no actual elemental gold in the wire.

  17. #41

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    Probably not a lot of titanium, either. It's pretty resistant to corrosion, as is tin. Iron and copper, OTOH, are certainly not. Tin is used to coat steel strings to prevent corrosion, and titanium is very hard and corrosion-resistant. It resists corrosion by forming an oxide film on the exposed surface, which happens almost instantaneously. Corrosion resistance is increased by the presence of iron and copper, for various reasons. I continue to be amazed at the wear patterns shown in this thread. I have no idea what process could affect such an alloy that way. It should be highly resistant to concentrated sulfuric and nitric acid. Something is going on that I don't understand.

  18. #42

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    I want to correct a statement that I made earlier: "The EVO frets are corroded wherever his fingers touch them a lot, but there is not much wear under the strings."

    I measured today, and I found fret heights from .047" down to as low as .036". The lowest areas are the fret ends on the treble side around frets 5, 6 and 7, and the spaces between strings in the same general area. The highest points (directly under the strings) in those areas are measuring around .040". So there is some significant loss of material even under the strings, just not quite as much as between or outside. To summarize, the player has lost almost 1/4 of the fret height in the areas he touches most.

  19. #43
    I'm a classical player. I have the same sort of wear pattern on my nickel-silver frets. I have a friend who plays a similar guitar made from the same luthier using the same fret material. His frets show virtually no sign of wear. Mine shows significant wear between the strings (not as much under the strings) after about 3-4 years of playing. On average I play 4 hours everyday, I have a light left hand.
    EVO Gold Frets Corroding-dsc00072-jpg

    I am quite convinced that its the composition of my perspiration. I'm fortunate though that I don't kill my strings exceptionally fast. Perhaps faster than someone without corrosive sweat but not exceedingly so.

    I was considering an EVO gold refret (at the same time I would also like to try taller frets) but after seeing this thread. I am having second thoughts. I have not heard of people using stainless steel frets on nylon string guitars and I am concerned about 2 things:
    1. SS frets may chew into the strings quicker.
    2. SS frets may sound significantly brighter. (I have watched comparison videos of SS vs Nickel frets on electric guitars and if there is a difference it does not bother me. Haven't found any reviews on acoustic nylon though)

    I may end up buying my own fretting tools to test on 1 to 2 beater guitars.