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  1. #1
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    Is there any hope for this 355?

    It's just what I've been looking for, an earlier 355 without a trem or varitone, or mods to remove them at a justifiable price... that will need some attention.

    You can see by the back that the PO carelessly wore through the finish, and I'm wondering if anything can be done with the large dents and finish problems without needing a huge $$ input. Or would continuing to hunt a git in better shape for more $$ be more worthwhile?

    Then again, since it's in such poor shape, would sanding and respraying it with Reranch products or Deft be a better option and just leave it as a player?



    Is there any hope for this 355?-beatup_es355-jpg
    Regards,

    Gary

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  3. #2
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    It's a nitro finish, and the large wear is around the area that player wear occurs. Leave that, and let it continue to wear. My first thought about the deep holes is to leave them alone, or research clear material that would remain in them if you must.

    How is the rest of the 355?

  4. #3
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    Depending on how deep the dents are, they may be repairable. Steam can raise the grain back to where it was, or close, if the wood hasn't been crushed too badly. StewMac's Trade Secrets has a video on how to do that, IIRC. It requires a laundry iron, which most people already have. You may have to remove the finish in the dents to let the steam penetrate, but you'll probably have to do some extensive refinishing anyway if that's the way you decide to go.

  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell View Post
    Depending on how deep the dents are, they may be repairable. Steam can raise the grain back to where it was, or close, if the wood hasn't been crushed too badly. StewMac's Trade Secrets has a video on how to do that, IIRC. It requires a laundry iron, which most people already have. You may have to remove the finish in the dents to let the steam penetrate, but you'll probably have to do some extensive refinishing anyway if that's the way you decide to go.
    I thought of steaming, and I've steamed dents out of expensive shotgun stocks but the wood on shotguns is solid, not laminate. I'd worry that the internal lamination might self destruct on the 355. If that were a danger, I'd leave that and focus on the buckle rash. I'd an expert's opinion before approaching that.

    The rest of the git, mostly the top has some rather deep scratches that dent the top, but I could live with them. Otherwise it looks to be in good order. It's well over a thousand miles away from South Florida (in Chicago) so I can't put eyes on it. I wish I could.

    Namelyguitar, I'm still in the thinking stage on it and if I were to get it, I think maybe you're right, play it as it is.
    Regards,

    Gary

  6. #5
    I need a better picture the dents I cannot even tell what you are taking about. Frankly this is a nitro finish and on the back of guitar. Relatively easy to sand the back completely even and hit it with finish again. If the stain in the back is not worn down it may just require another clear coat. The dents I need to see what they are as I said.
    specializing in repair and setup, does your guitar play like it should?

  7. #6
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    Two jacks in the rim? What gives?

    Is that a patch of wear from crotch grinding? I'd sterilise it and then wax over.

    Leave it as it is largely.
    Great Deals with Great Folks: max52 (Guild-Benedetto Artist Award); prickards (Ribbecke GC Halfling); Cincy2 (Comins Concert)

  8. #7
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    What are you worried about? Guitar will play and sound fine inspite of a little worn finish. And it’s only in the back....... ;-)

    The back of my ES-125 is a lot worse:



    Two jacks: stereo.

    :: Jazz, Funk, Soul & Boogaloo: My group ::
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  9. #8
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    This is the kind of damage that I welcome because it’s invisible when you play the guitar, doesn’t harm structural integrity and knocks off a couple hundred $$$ of the price!

    :: Jazz, Funk, Soul & Boogaloo: My group ::
    ::::::: Listen to Hip Jazz a Go Go! :::::::
    :: Jazz, Soul, Blues: Eva & The Tracies :::

  10. #9
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    Nice-looking guit, I say go for it and not even worry about dressing it back up.

  11. #10
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    This is the kind of wear that commands premium dollars when it says Yuri Shiskov or Tom Murphy relic-ked. Instead, you get it for free. What's not to like?

    Use it to knock the price down and then play the hell out of it.
    Great Deals with Great Folks: max52 (Guild-Benedetto Artist Award); prickards (Ribbecke GC Halfling); Cincy2 (Comins Concert)

  12. #11

    no respect

    Someone that would not move his / her belt buckle to the side ( simple fix ) to avoid this kind of abuse has no respect for the instrument.

    What kind of hidden damage ( abuse ) is there?

    I'm not a fanatic about dings and scrapes, my instruments have their fair share. But they don't have that kind of avoidable damage.

  13. #12
    That's so easy to fix. The secret is shellac. Binds and blends well with lacquer. I get flakes and de-solve them in denatured alcohol. Black is easy to match. I'd get artist paint or tint that matches the color. Sand the area a bit. Paint. Then shellac/french polish. I completely refinished my ES 175 with shellac with amazing results.

  14. #13
    The reason I chose shellac is it's not poisonous like lacquer and safe to use indoors. It's an edible product (used in some pills as coating). That's the material old masters used to finish violins and classical guitars.
    Also it's hand applied, not sprayed.

  15. #14
    You got picture of your 175? I assume you refinnish the whole guitar in shellac?
    specializing in repair and setup, does your guitar play like it should?

  16. #15
    I have this one picture with me (low res). It doesn't do it justice. Shellac can get beautifully polished.Sanded the lacquer a bit first. I did it initially to repair a minor finish damage, as well as to give it a more aged, vintage look. I used amber shellac for this reason. Still working on improving some areas as this is my first experience with shellac. But it's coming together very nicely. It's very easy to undo/redo/repair the finish locally. Very forgiving. Once the overall guitar is done, minor improvements, polishing etc doesn't prevent using the guitar in the mean time.
    Attached Images Attached Images Is there any hope for this 355?-img_20181225_165510-jpg 

  17. #16
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    Shellac is great, as noted - infinitely repairable, organic, etc.
    Can be shined up ("French Polished") to as much of a shine as you want.
    Comes clear, or tinted.
    Sticks to lacquer and vice-versa (some builders use it as a sealer before finishing with lacquer)
    Great for repairs.
    It can be sprayed, but that's certainly not necessary for "kitchen luthiery."
    However, it is very soft and very fragile. If you don't mind the wear that it will inevitably show if you actually use the guitar, then it is a great finish. My favourite.
    "Somebody get me out of this chair." - BOB WILLS
    Hammertone is a registered Hofnerologist.

  18. #17

  19. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jabberwocky View Post
    Two jacks in the rim? What gives?
    >>SNIP<<
    Gibson stereo gits like the 345 and 355 have two jacks. My Lucille and 345 are stereo but I only tried the stereo thing a long time ago and haven't since. It was IIRC a cool effect playing out of two amps but it's so long ago my stereo cable rig got lost. I may try it again now that I have two gits wired for stereo :-)
    Regards,

    Gary

  20. #19
    1. It's on the back
    2. It won't affect tone

    So from what I can see, there is nothing to "save." Like many of us oldsters here, it's had a few rough knocks in its life, has stories to tell, but has survived and still has worth in this world.

  21. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by dickbanks View Post
    1. It's on the back
    2. It won't affect tone

    So from what I can see, there is nothing to "save." Like many of us oldsters here, it's had a few rough knocks in its life, has stories to tell, but has survived and still has worth in this world.
    I think you quoted someone else as I never said "save"

    I have more than a few road warrior gits, in ways, some worse than this one. But... this was / is a premium git and IMO it shouldn't be left as it is any more than a $500 pair of Italian leather shoes should be left with holes in the soles just because the tops look good :-)

    At any rate, It's been for sale for quite some time with over 1300 views, so I think I'm in the camp with many others who are weighing a refurbish versus a play as it is purchase.
    Regards,

    Gary

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