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  1. #1

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    So i have searched high and low and cannot find an answer to this. I was wondering if, on my hollow body, or any hollow body, if you can replace the type of tailpiece currently on it. I am wanting a certain a style other than the one currently on my guitar and was wondering if you can do that? Such as when i change the strings i can just take the old tailpiece off, put the new one on, and be done with it and continue restringing. Would it require a new setup, etc?

    Sorry, new to hollow body guitars.

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  3. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by san0648 View Post
    So i have searched high and low and cannot find an answer to this. I was wondering if, on my hollow body, or any hollow body, if you can replace the type of tailpiece currently on it. I am wanting a certain a style other than the one currently on my guitar and was wondering if you can do that? Such as when i change the strings i can just take the old tailpiece off, put the new one on, and be done with it and continue restringing. Would it require a new setup, etc?

    Sorry, new to hollow body guitars.
    In most circumstances, yes - assuming the new one fits. What kind of guitar are we talking about, and why do you want to change it? (From what to what?) How about a picture.

  4. #3

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    If the length the same, then should be simple switch.
    No, I'm not going to give you the answer to your question. I don't want to deny you the pleasure you'll receive when you figure it out yourself. -- Bill Evans talking to his brother.

  5. #4

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    EXCEPT the holes on the new tailpiece might not match the holes in the guitar.... so you might have to drill new holes in the guitar, and then you still might have some of the old holes showing. Just because most tailpieces have 3 screw holes in a triangle does not mean they are the same.

  6. #5

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  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by ruger9 View Post
    EXCEPT the holes on the new tailpiece might not match the holes in the guitar.... so you might have to drill new holes in the guitar, and then you still might have some of the old holes showing. Just because most tailpieces have 3 screw holes in a triangle does not mean they are the same.
    In which case, your luthier simply plugs the original holes...very common.

    I changed the original stock finger style tailpiece on the SKB to a solid ebony Buscarino tailpiece. Luthier filled the holes close to beyond recognition they were previously there.

    When I got pretty good I went on the road with a group - We starved - Wes Montgomery

  8. #7
    Its on an Epiphone Broadway. Not that I'm not happy with the current stock tailpiece, but something along the lines of what 2bornot2bop posted. Sorry, no pictures on my computer of my specific one, but that's where I'm starting from.

  9. #8

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    Of course you can, like others said maybe need to drill new holes and fill / plug the old ones but you just take your time you measure and everything should be fine.
    Make it so it is aligning perfectly with the neck, when I did my Regent overhaul, I put the 6th string and used the old 6th in position 1 and centered everything to the neck before screwing all in place.
    You can easily find a good diamond trapeze 175 / 350 style to replace that frequensator that is on your Broadway like it was on my Regent...
    I love heavier tailpieces and nowadays it is easy to find nice replacement, not like 4 or 5 years ago...

    Tailpiece Replacement-vinlander-albums-epiladies-picture12135-customized-epiphone-regent-its-final-form-custom-homemad-jpg
    Last edited by vinlander; 07-08-2014 at 08:51 PM.
    ...every note has an origin and a destination...
    - Tal Farlow

  10. #9

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    @vinlander, that is a nice tailpiece. Where did you find it?

  11. #10

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    Nice Regent. The new tailpiece is great! I see you also added an in-the-body humbuker.... don't like floaters? Or don't like mini-HBs?

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by edh View Post
    @vinlander, that is a nice tailpiece. Where did you find it?
    It is an inexpensive Chinese reproduction of the traditional trapeze tailpiece that started to be available since a couple years on Ebay similar to that one : Chrome 6 String Jazz Bass Guitar Trapeze Tailpiece Bridge TOP Bronze Made NEW | eBay
    For the price I must say so far it holds quite well even with 13-56 flats on.
    I just added a laminated rosewood plate to it for esthetic reason.

    Quote Originally Posted by ruger9 View Post
    Nice Regent. The new tailpiece is great! I see you also added an in-the-body humbuker.... don't like floaters? Or don't like mini-HBs?
    As much as I like the unplugged tone of the Regent, I could never like the thin tone I was getting when plugged in (too much like a flat top acoustic).
    After the modified Korean Kent Armstrong and the Bartolini 5J, I realised floaters were not to give me the tone I am into (on that guitar).
    I decided to route a classic 57 in the top and it sounds now much better to my ears; but in a week or so, I am trying a Charlie Christian Humbucker single coil I ordered from Pete Biltoft to get a more 50s vibe
    Last edited by vinlander; 07-09-2014 at 08:41 AM.
    ...every note has an origin and a destination...
    - Tal Farlow

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinlander View Post
    but in a week or so, I am trying a Charlie Christian Humbucker single coil I ordered from Pete Biltoft to get a more 50s vibe
    oh boy!!! Be sure to post back with your observations!!!

  14. #13
    So basically the thing i need to worry about is the previous holes, filling them if necessary, and aligning the tailpiece if new holes are needing to be set. Correct?


    Vinlander - that is a very nice tailpiece indeed!

  15. #14

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    >>> So basically the thing i need to worry about is the previous holes, filling them if necessary, and aligning the tailpiece if new holes are needing to be set. Correct?


    Most likely, yes.

    But there are other unexpected thrills that are unlikely but possible. You may do best to check the likely break angle (over the bridge) and clearance above the top before committing to the installation.

    These are not likely to be a problem, but nothing beats a thorough review before you start drilling.

    In my inconvenient (but maybe not entirely useless) opinion.

    Chris

  16. #15

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    You also need to make sure that the replacement tail piece is line up dead nut perfect centered on the lower bout. Even a slight eighth of an inch will cause a floating bridge base to creep in the direction of the misalignment.
    Patrick2 . . Heritage representative (now former)

  17. #16

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    In my opinion, it's much easier to pay a pro to do the job. I don't fiddle with my fiddles.
    When I got pretty good I went on the road with a group - We starved - Wes Montgomery

  18. #17

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    And re-connect the ground wire, if any.

  19. #18

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    [Patrick] >>> You also need to make sure that the replacement tail piece is line up dead nut perfect centered on the lower bout. Even a slight eighth of an inch will cause a floating bridge base to creep in the direction of the misalignment.

    100% agreed with the principle - it has to be lined up well.
    But in practice it is the neck with which you must be aligned, not necessarily the body.

    It is not so rare to find a guitar with the neck not perfectly lined up with the center line of the body. In such a case, you do not want to blindly set the tailpiece only based on the body. Far better to make sure the strings will track down the neck correctly.

    In my opinion.

    Chris

  20. #19

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    Another concern-

    The Broadway has an endpin. 3 screw holes AND a hole for the endpin. All of the online tailpieces I see have no center hole for the endpin???

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by PTChristopher2 View Post
    [Patrick] >>> You also need to make sure that the replacement tail piece is line up dead nut perfect centered on the lower bout. Even a slight eighth of an inch will cause a floating bridge base to creep in the direction of the misalignment.

    100% agreed with the principle - it has to be lined up well.
    But in practice it is the neck with which you must be aligned, not necessarily the body.

    It is not so rare to find a guitar with the neck not perfectly lined up with the center line of the body. In such a case, you do not want to blindly set the tailpiece only based on the body. Far better to make sure the strings will track down the neck correctly.

    In my opinion.

    Chris
    Once again . . . I've learned from you. I never even considered the possibility of a misaligned neck . . . except on a bolt-on, like a strat. I would imagine it would take someone returning to the bench from a very long 4 Martini lunch and then setting the neck . . . . to actually screw up enough to misalign it? I've seen necks set with the tongue and mortise joint as well as the dove tail joint. I'm not sure I can imagine how a misalignment would occur.?.? Could you please . . "splain" further"
    Patrick2 . . Heritage representative (now former)

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by ruger9 View Post
    Another concern-

    The Broadway has an endpin. 3 screw holes AND a hole for the endpin. All of the online tailpieces I see have no center hole for the endpin???
    The tailpiece I got (es 175 copy) has a wide center hole for the endpin and 3 screw holes. I had previously bought in the past an Harp shaped one that had no center hole, but nothing a power drill could not fix

    Regarding alignment of the tailpiece, of course it must be perfectly aligned to the fret board and the middle of the body is indeed no warranty of that...I changed the tailpiece on both my Joe Pass and Regent and on the Regent it is dead on with both the neck and body but on the JP it seems the neck is maybe a bit less than 1/8 offset.
    What I do is using a string of similar tension in the 6th and 1st tuner and make sure it is aligned in relation to fret board before making the holes and screwing in place.
    Yes like mentioned, don`t forget the ground wire...
    I don't mind to thinker with my cheap imports but on some more expensive guitar I would probably refer to a pro
    Last edited by vinlander; 07-11-2014 at 01:06 PM. Reason: clarity
    ...every note has an origin and a destination...
    - Tal Farlow

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinlander View Post
    The tailpiece I got (es 175 copy) has a wide center hole for the endpin and 3 screw holes. I had previously bought in the past an Harp shaped one that had no center hole, but nothing a power drill could not fix
    Is that really the answer? If I want a new tailpiece (and plan on using a strap) I have to drill the endpin hole myself? Were archtop literally designed with the strap left out of the equation? I guess it's possible....

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by ruger9 View Post
    Is that really the answer? If I want a new tailpiece (and plan on using a strap) I have to drill the endpin hole myself? Were archtop literally designed with the strap left out of the equation? I guess it's possible....
    Well it depends which Tailpiece you get.
    For instance that one is obviously fine:
    Gold Fancy Trapeze Tailpiece for ES 175® New Style | eBay

    More or less the one I got:
    Gold 6 String Jazz Bass Guitar Trapeze Tailpiece Bridge Top Bronze Made | eBay

    And the other model I got previously that I drilled the additional hole in for endpin:
    Golden Vintage Casting Trapeze Tailpiece for 335 Guitar | eBay

    With all model probably new holes will need to be drilled and old holes filled with toothpick/glue and wax pen (my solution) others might do different.
    Last edited by vinlander; 07-11-2014 at 07:42 PM.
    ...every note has an origin and a destination...
    - Tal Farlow

  25. #24

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    That last one you posted is the one I like, out of all the ones I've seen. I don't have a drill press (just a power drill), and I'm a contractor so I drill all the time, but I want it to be a clean hole that looks nice... Not sure I can do that w/o a drill press? [the kind of work I do doesn't usually require the finesse of lutherie LOL]

  26. #25

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    Well what I did was using a simple hand drill, but I did punch a small centered mark from the inside before and was drilling very slowly with the tailpiece secured on some wooden block. It is really not something difficult, I also did all the holes for the tailpiece in the guitar with the black & decker. Just need to go slow and increase the size of the drill bit progressively. Taking your time and that should be fine.
    ...every note has an origin and a destination...
    - Tal Farlow

  27. #26

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    >>> I never even considered the possibility of a misaligned neck . . . except on a bolt-on, like a strat. I would imagine it would take someone returning to the bench from a very long 4 Martini lunch and then setting the neck . . . . to actually screw up enough to misalign it?

    In my opinion it is easier than it may seem to have a slight mis-alignment in the neck. A slight change in a hand-cut dovetail or mortise/tenon can project easily to a 3mm (1/8) offset in the ideal tailpiece location. Likewise the tolerance stack-up in a production environment can (and does) result in some imperfect alignment.

    >>> I've seen necks set with the tongue and mortise joint as well as the dove tail joint. I'm not sure I can imagine how a misalignment would occur.?.? Could you please . . "splain" further"

    In my opinion it comes through the tolerance stack-up in a factory production process, and the minor human touch and imperfection in a bench-made guitar.

    It is something to be very carefully considered when doing a neck reset. For example, on a flat-top you will be doing all sorts of careful (razor-sharp) chisel re-cutting of the dovetail. In such a case you need to be very careful to match up to the existing bridge location. (Which is only a small part of why guitars neck resets are not a way to make any real money - in my opinion anyway.)

    On our archtops this slight misalignment offers no harm really - just the need to be mindful that we are not aiming the tailpiece for a given location on the body of the guitar, but rather for the centerline of the FB.

    My opinion.

    Chris
    Last edited by PTChristopher2; 07-11-2014 at 09:06 PM. Reason: spelling

  28. #27

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    Oh and,...

    The potential misalignment is not necessarily in the neck joint. Bodies can be unintentionally asymmetrical in the lower bout. Or if there is a center seam in the rim, it can be somewhat off-center. In my observation, it happens.

    Chris