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  1. #1
    Hey there,

    I have been playing the guitar for 5 years or so now and my friend and I decided that I get his 2nd bass for my 2nd guitar - at least for a while (I am mainly playing the guitar).

    Now after playing a little without a real good technique, I wonder if anyone knows a good website or free pdf lessons or stuff, I know I should buy a bass method if I really want to play - but I'd like something "for free" at the moment to check out if I am willing to spend time on "the bass".

    I am a real beginner at playing bass, so it would be great if someone knows a technique website or something similiar, so I can learn how to pick with my fingers.

    Thanks

    Julian

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Check the forum talkbass.com. Ask them for resources.

    I don't know if you're just interested in jazz, but I spend a lot of time working out James Jamerson lines, and playing along with the recordings to get the feel happening.
    So I would say find a style or bassist you like and start learning lines.

    Look up info on walking bass lines, and check youtube for lessons.

  4. #3
    Well, I really enjoy Jazz. Okay, thanks for your tip. Any cool jazz bassists except James Jamerson I should know?

    Thank you!!!

  5. #4

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    I'll echo RyanM and say TalkBass is one of the best sites around for help on bass.

    As far as guys to listen to, Jaco Pastorius is one of the most important electric bassists of all time. Arguably every jazz bassist since his death has been influenced by him. Victor Wooten, Stanley Clarke, Marcus Miller, and Nathan East are also prominent jazz (some of them are fusion) players. Check out Wooten's Groove Workshop DVD once you've started getting bass technique down; it's helpful for anybody who plays a rhythmic role in music.

    Scott LaFaro, Charles Mingus, Paul Chambers, and Ron Carter are upright players that are very important. If you're interested in more traditional jazz you probably want to check out upright players, even if you are only playing bass guitar. I was at a Marcus Miller masterclass where he taught a variation on palm-muting that helped coax an upright bass sound out of a bass guitar.

  6. #5
    Nuff Said Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Blue(s) Skies View Post
    I am a real beginner at playing bass, so it would be great if someone knows a technique website or something similiar, so I can learn how to pick with my fingers.
    I occasionally play Bass, I found navigating the fingerboard difficult at first because there are no frets and its a big instrument, but once you get used to the size and fingerboard it has a great sound. I don't bow the instrument, I play strictly picato.

    For more Bass info search for "Ed Friedland".

    Nuff

  7. #6
    well thank you!

    I'll check that forum. I really enjoy playing the bass, but I am also a guitarist (that's what I mainly do) and I'll have to find a balance between the two instruments.

    I'll check those bassists, are you guys diehard bass players or do you guys play the guitar as well?

  8. #7

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    Bass guitar was my first instrument, and I still play occasionally, but I spend more time working on guitar playing. The difference in guitar and bass guitar is not so much a change in technique as much as a change in mindset, even compared to playing walking lines on your 6th string.

    I've always wanted to learn upright bass, but it's a very unforgiving instrument. Most upright players I've talked to mention that you really have to practice every single day or your technique will suffer, and I don't have the time to keep up with it on top of the constant learning on guitar and tuba.

  9. #8

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    I'm using this book,

    Amazon.com: Hal Leonard Bass Method - Complete Edition: Books 1, 2 and 3 Bound Together in One Easy-To-Use Volume! [With Compact Disc] [HAL LEONARD BASS METHOD - COMP]: Books

    It's the three book series bound together in one bood with three cds of backing tracks. I'm into the third book. If you're not going to take private lessons I think using a method book is a good idea. The fingering on a bass is different and you have to shift your hand more because of the longer neck and the frets being farther apart. And the book gives you a path to follow as opposed to noodling around which is what I might do without the book.

    I think playing bass is good for my guitar comping/rhythm playing. It's easy to have the tendency of wanting to play something fancy on the guitar as it's more interesting. But as part of a rhythm section your role isn't to stand out, rather it is to add to or hold down the groove. Same as the mindset of a bass player, at least the bass style that I like to hear.

    Listening to some of the bass players at talkbass.com play, some of them take a guitar player attitude and play a slap style, like their out front playing a solo all the time. I've learned to really dislike that style. I much prefer the bassist that hold the bottom down and groove.

  10. #9

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    I am starting a small group of videos on the bass, they may be helpful.
    Any techniques or lesson ideas leave them here.





    Cheers!!!.... PapoJims
    Musical thoughts.... Musical ideas.... We all have a song inside.

  11. #10

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    I took classical and flamenco guitar to help with my right hand years ago. and I used to make my bass students take a few drum lessons. only thing I can add

  12. #11

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    That's a great fiend to share his bass with you. I would ask him for suggestions and lessons.

    My list of Great jazz bass players would include: Ray Brown, Paul Chambers, Dave Holland, Steve Swallow, Ron Carter, Charles Mingus.

    Jamey Abersold has a bunch of book/CDs with bass lines, etc. and other resources on bass technique, including Chuck Rainey's The Complete Electric Bass Player. Those might give you some insights into print (plus) methods that are available after you've look at free stuff on the web.

    PapoJim's videos look helpful and if you do a search for "learning jazz bass" you'll find lots of videos and websites.

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Atticus View Post
    I was at a Marcus Miller masterclass where he taught a variation on palm-muting that helped coax an upright bass sound out of a bass guitar.
    I'm curious to know more about this.


    My main instrument is the guitar which I started playing 55 years ago. I had a one year try at the upright bass a long time ago and I'm currently playing the electric bass for an amateur jazz band, members of which asked me to fill the gap of having no bass player.

    All pro guitar players I know agree that playing the bass is very valuable for a guitarist. It'a a fun way to practice scales.

    To get up to speed, I used the two Ed Friedland's books and the constructingwalkingjazzbasslines.com four books by Steven Mooney. All are excellent, very complementary, and full of very valuable material. Don't hesitate to invest into them if you waant to pursue your bass playing education. I would recommend to start with Ed's first book for the basic education and the Steven's Blues book tab edition to get examples of complete blues bass lines.
    Last edited by mhch; 12-05-2014 at 01:43 AM.
    Perfection is in the Details, but Perfection isn't a Detail (Leonardo da Vinci)

  14. #13

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    If you are in to walking bass, here is a good start which you can get a grasp of what it is all about.
    The International Institute Of Bassists | Bass Lessons Online - Jim Stinnett

  15. #14

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    The best thing I ever found for learning jazz bass are the backing tracks at ralphpatt.com. Huge number of standards in standard keys and tempos. The baselines are simple and tasteful, and easy to cop. Play those lines and you won't be embarrassed. As a guitar player, my instinct was to get too harmonically complex; these lines cured me of that.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue(s) Skies View Post
    Well, I really enjoy Jazz. Okay, thanks for your tip. Any cool jazz bassists except James Jamerson I should know?

    Thank you!!!
    Look for free transcriptions from Ray Brown, Paul Chambers, Sam Jones, Milton Hinton, John Kirby, Johnny Miller, Joe Comfort, Reggie Johnson, George Duvivier, John Clayton, Stanley Banks, Curley Russell, Tommy Potter, Nick Fenton, Percy Heath, Charles Mingus, Ron Carter, Oscar Pettiford, Rufus Reid.

  17. #16

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    A very cool guy and a good teacher.

  18. #17

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    Bob Magnusson's book The Art of Walking Bass would also be good to start