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  1. #1

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    When I was playing bass and got some cash I bought a perfect bass setup for small/medium gigs, a great Fender 75 reissue jazz bass which I got half price and a Genz Benz Shuttle 3.0 10T. Unfortunately I started jazz guitar which took over my bass playing, now the beautiful bass isn't getting played much, I don't get the same enjoyment out of bass as I used to. If seems a waste to keep it if I'm not playing it, and right now I could really use the same sort of setup with a nice guitar for jazz. And in the future I see myself playing guitar not bass. And selling it would make quite a bit of $$ for what I want. But I'm reluctant to get rid of it, just in case. What should I do?

    I also have a decent Squier Jazz bass which I haven't gotten rid of yet and a G&L tele style electric, only the one amp though ^ which is a bass one. And a cheap as steel string acoustic but that's not worth much.

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  3. #2

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    well since you asked
    id wait a year

    first gear never seems to get cheaper, especially quality gear
    second you clearly like the gear
    third -guitar players are a dime a dozen (my dogs play guitar!!!LOL)

    but what i mean is that often a bass player may find more places to play and need for him than a guitar player

    finally, your new found love may simmer down, and you may find that you enjoy both -my son does, as do i

    but when i started mando, then bass, then piano, especially in teh early phases which take a good deal of time and concentrated pracitce and attention to become....self satisfying.....other things do get set aside....but only for awhile

    if you can afford to let it sit, i would suggest to do so, and wait , only more time will give you a clearer pciture if your really DONE with it

    i find there is something i really like about playing bass, and it may be the rhythm aspect as well as counter melody which i dont seem to do the same way with guitar

    i often find that selling something ive had a long time, (which i rarely do anymore) often brings regret, sometimes a year or more later

    again it all boils down to money-if you need it now-you need it
    if you dump it -you may pay more later, -
    it seems nothing of quality gets cheaper-new prices seem to be rising regardless of the economy, and newer woods might not be as nice either

    and it wont be the stuff you have now-it might be identical model replacements, but it wont have your 'mojo' into it, or the uniqueness of your current insturments

    my two cents

  4. #3

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    Man I'd keep that Amp !
    It'd be ideal for clean jazz guitar (light and loud too)

    and keep a bass you never know when might need one
    for practice or a gig
    Get a looper for practice too

  5. #4
    My love for bass has been steadily dying down over the last 2 or 3 years and during that time it's been used more by other people I've lent it to than me, while my love for guitar has been steadily rising. I just don't see myself turning back, it's been pretty much unused in 2 or 3 years. And that amp is nice but putting my solid body through it doesn't sound too too good, haven't managed to configure something even between the highs and lows. Not sure how it'd be with an archtop or acoustic though. There's only so many hours in a day I can practice and I want to be the best I can be at my favorite instrument, guitar. I can still hold my own on a bass but my skill is dying slowly, and the work I'd need to put in to get it up to scratch I'd rather further my guitar playing. Of course I'll always be able to play a bass but without more work not to a level where I'd be happy with it, and that work is going to guitar playing. I don't know what to do!

  6. #5

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    It's just my opinion, but I'd keep it if financially possible. Think about what it will cost you to replace "a perfect bass setup for small/medium gigs". There will come a time (or gig) when you wish you had it. Sell the Squire and the other stuff you don't care about. I've sold gear only to discover later that it would be ideal for what I want to do now, but I either can't find it or can't afford it at current prices.

    Ask me sometime about that old Fender tweed I traded for something more 'modern' because it had 2 channels. On second thought, don't.. it makes me cry and bang my head on walls.

    PLUS, figuring out bass lines can help when you're working out or writing a tune. Sometimes I'll work out a bass line I like first on a tune and and try to build up a chord structure I like from there.
    Last edited by AlohaJoe; 01-27-2012 at 09:22 PM.
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  7. #6
    Okay. Sticking with it. Will sell the Squier. And from now on I'll plan to spend 10 minutes a day honing my bass chops again. Thanks people.

  8. #7

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    It's good that you decided to keep the bass - but should you decide to sell it, PM me. Bass+guitar is my favorite musical setting, and since it is always easier to find great guitarists, I took up bass way back and bought a Steinberger when they first came out. But then they became cult items, and a guy made me an offer I simply could not refuse, so I have been without a bass for too long. Regarding the amp, you might want to look at the JazzKat series - fantastic, small, light, LOUD amps. I have the Phat model and it is the best amp I have ever owned (including Fenders, Mesa, G/K, and others).

  9. #8

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    I think you're doing the right thing by keeping the good bass. I was in the same boat as you not that long ago. I started out as a jazz bass player but turned my energies toward the guitar. Every once in a while, I enjoy putting on some good tunes, digging out my 60 Fender Jazz Bass reissue and going to work.

  10. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by JimBobWay View Post
    Regarding the amp, you might want to look at the JazzKat series - fantastic, small, light, LOUD amps. I have the Phat model and it is the best amp I have ever owned (including Fenders, Mesa, G/K, and others).
    Pretty expensive though..

  11. #10

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    I go through a similar thing every few years with my Ric 4001. Every time I think about selling it, I get it out, clean it up, plug it in and play for awhile and then the urge to sell it passes.

  12. #11

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    Keep the bass - it will give you lots of gigs

  13. #12

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    The price of a fender precision in 1970 was $280.

    If you adjust it for inflation using this: The Inflation Calculator

    The 1970 price in 2010 adjusted for inflation would be $1,554

    The actual price today is $1,200, adjusted for inflation that's less than they cost in 1970.

    Fender American Standard Precision Bass: Shop Bass & Other Musical Instruments | Musician's Friend

    Prices have actually been going down overtime.

    I'd sell your bass unless there is some reason that it is really special to you. Otherwise it can be easily replaced. Sell it if you can get a good price for it. The Squire bass will be just fine to practice on and even gig with. Keep the amp.

    Buy yourself a nice jazz guitar.

    imo of course.

  14. #13

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    What if you want to record backing tracks to play along with? The bass will be great.

  15. #14

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    You'll find a use for the bass and amp (by the way, I have the same one). I gig on electric guitar, harmonica, Dobro and bass, and I need to keep up with all of them. You may find that you can play with people or at venues where they have too many guitars and no bass, or even situations where you would rather play bass. In any case, any action would be premature at this point.

    Me, I'd hate to have to give up any of my instruments -- I get something different out of each one.

    For what it's worth, I liked the small and lightweight G-B 10Ts that I bought a pair to use with my Mesa/Boogie head.


  16. #15

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    Keep the Amp!! I use a bass amp for guitar. If you're playing jazz there won't be a need for another amp right away. The clean tones from a bass amp are usually great.

    You might as well keep the bass, unless space or money is part of the equation.

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by SammieWammie View Post
    Pretty expensive though..
    Yeah, but sometimes the cost is worth it, we all need to make that decision ourselves. I have a mid-90's Fender "Evil" Twin that is easily as loud as any of my rock stacks from the salad daze (Marshall, Sun, Orange, et al).

    You can get a similar amp (in US) for insanely low $ - 150-ish, I have even seen them for 99 in pawn shops - but I recommend you invest in a wheeled dolly as they are very heavy. The PhatKat out-performs my Twin in every way, and the $500 I spent on it paid itself forward and backward. It weighs less than my 2 main gig axes + cases.

    But I like having the Twin, just in case I ever need to play a stadium or arena...and on 1/2 of 1 volume with the standard spring reverb it's a great daily practice and recording amp.

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by JimBobWay View Post
    I have a mid-90's Fender "Evil" Twin that is easily as loud as any of my rock stacks from the salad daze (Marshall, Sun, Orange, et al).

    You can get a similar amp (in US) for insanely low $ - 150-ish, I have even seen them for 99 in pawn shops - but I recommend you invest in a wheeled dolly as they are very heavy.
    Show me where I can get a working Fender Twin Reverb for $150 or $99 and I'll buy it... I'll buy 2 at that price.

    fender twin reverb amp | eBay

  19. #18
    I am also a bass player, where I live bass players I guess are hard to find. I get ask all the time to play. I am a guitar player, but make a few bucks playing bass. I have a Fender USA P and a Mark Bass Jeff Berlin combo, and I wouldn't get rid of it for anything. I find playing bass once in a while makes me a better guitar player. I have fun with both, in church my Pastor is an awesome guitarist, sometimes he will play a lead and I will do the same lead on bass. When we get a good groove together its awesome, I just did a couple recordings for a guy, and the the lead was me playing lead on the bass. If I get permission maybe he will let me put it on here. He paid me so its his music if you know what I am saying. But yea keep the bass. In a while you will be glad you did.

  20. #19

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    Many of you are failing to mention that SammieWammie has two bass guitars. Did you all see that in his original post? Also, he is most interested in jazz guitar and doesn't have much money.

    I'd also mention he's got innate ability, i.e. talent and is young (can't remember his age but I believe he's 15). I believe he's already gotten solo gigs playing jazz guitar (or maybe a duo with a female vocalist?, I'm trying to remember), in a couple a years he'll probably be all over playing chord melody jazz standards and making money at it. A jazz guitar is a necessary tool for him.

    I play bass, those Squire's are awfully similar to the MIA. The biggest difference is price which is due to the cost of labor in the respective countries they're built in.

    So his choice is:

    1 -
    MIA Fender Jazz Bass
    Squire Jazz Bass
    G & L Tele Style Electric
    Genz Benz Shuttle 3.0 10T amp

    or
    2-
    Hollow Body Jazz Guitar
    Squire Jazz Bass
    G & L Tele Style Electric
    Genz Benz Shuttle 3.0 10T amp

    If I understand all of you, you all seem to think he's better off with #1. Huh?

    I think: He wants to pursue jazz guitar, get a jazz guitar... go with #2
    Last edited by fep; 02-02-2012 at 03:43 PM.

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by fep View Post
    Show me where I can get a working Fender Twin Reverb for $150 or $99 and I'll buy it... I'll buy 2 at that price.

    fender twin reverb amp | eBay
    Mine is the "Evil" Twin - (Fender Pro 185) not the same as the tube version. But roughly 2X louder. And as far as where to buy, try Craigslist...and I have seen similar across the US in pawnshops and neighborhood music stores. But if you want a true, excellent condition Twin tube I can hook you up with someone who is eager to unload his. I would buy it myself but I have all the amps I need and no time for eBay et al. It's a classic. But times have changed, or I would have bought it instead of what I chose for my needs.

  22. #21

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    I am going to sound like a smart ass. However, I have played guitar since 1967 and bass since 1971. I took up upright before electric. I have played and gigged regularly over the years. Advice: play the guitar for personal enjoyment. Play the bass for cash. You will always get more gigs on bass. So...don't give up the sweet rig if you can swing it.

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone View Post
    I am going to sound like a smart ass. However, I have played guitar since 1967 and bass since 1971. I took up upright before electric. I have played and gigged regularly over the years. Advice: play the guitar for personal enjoyment. Play the bass for cash. You will always get more gigs on bass.
    Sad but true.

  24. #23

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    Keep bass gear around there is more work if you're solid time keeper.

    I've bounced back and forth between bass and guitar my whole life and studying one reveal things on the other. Especially fingerboard knowledge.
    No, I'm not going to give you the answer to your question. I don't want to deny you the pleasure you'll receive when you figure it out yourself. -- Bill Evans talking to his brother.

  25. #24

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    If you do not love the bass ... Me I have been playing guitar for some time now but I love bass best. for so long I still called myself a bass player . so I bought a double neck guitar/bass and now I can play both at the same time. I do not know what I am. but maybe you were just not a bass player at heart. nothing like locking in with a drummer while I am plying bass.

  26. #25

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    Keep the bass. Better calls to gig in a band.

    When you find a way in, bump off the guitar player. Now you're a guitarist playing in a band.

    But keep the bass because you will never know...

  27. #26

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    Last night, I saw smooth jazz ace Chris Standring. His gear (presumably hired, or borrowed) for the first night of his UK tour, was a Mark Bass Head into and Eden (bass) 4 x 10" cab. He played his Benedetto Benny through a multi FX and a couple of other pedals......and doing that "bebop lines over soul/jazz groove" thang, sounded quite marvellous; however, on Jobim's How Insensative, he had a sweet jazz tone to die for.

    All that through bass gear, but with a good guitar. Think that's your way to go.

  28. #27

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    Playing bass can only improve your guitar playing, especially your harmonic sense. Also, you may, like I did, end up playing 7-string guitar, combining the two.

  29. #28

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    I have to go with the following...because they are very true for me!

    1. Never give up the bass. I've played guitar 10 times longer than bass...and playing bass maintains and often improves your sense of timing.

    2. Guitarists are a dime a dozen...I feel like I contribute much more to jams I attend as a bassist. The guitarists are always stepping on themselves attempting to stand out!

    The guitar and bass complement each other and are similar to play...unlike taking up the Mandolin which I also tried but never have the time to adequately pursue.

  30. #29

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    No, never, and keep your bass chops up. Heck, learn to walk upright (Wiiiiillllmmaaaa!) and you're set. As much as I love the guitar... it isn't as essential as the bass. Plus, bands ALWAYS need bassists, guitarists are icing on the cake (very tasty icing, but icing never the less... unless you are Freddie Green)

  31. #30

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    What Eddie Charles and Irez87 said.

    I have played guitar for 50 years and upright bass for about 45 years. (Electric bass for a little less than that.)

    There are _many_ more bass calls. Remember: Sir Paul McCartney was a very competent guitarist...but he became one of the most recorded bassists of all time because the band needed a bass player. Bands _always_ need a bass player.

    My son is an _outstanding_ guitarist. That said, he gets many, many more gigs and recording opportunities as both a bassist and a drummer.

    Do NOT give up your bass gear.

  32. #31

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    deffo keep the amp ...

    it'll work great with a jazz box ....

  33. #32

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    I noted just now that my first reply was in March 2009...surely we have settled this problem by now! Me, I am in more demand than ever as a bass player, and I can't imagine going back to "only" guitar. Here's a recent gig:

    Bassist turned guitarist, should I keep my bass gear?-library-00_zpsetlkgkr7-jpg

    That's a Fender CIJ Classic '51 single-coil P. I also gig with a couple of split-coil Ps, a StingRay 5, and a Godin A5 fretless.

  34. #33

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    I always got more gigs on electric bass.
    With pianists, quartets, trios. Jazz. Country, big band, community theater.

    I play guitar too but that is my at home compositional tool and I accompany a couple of torch singers. But the group work is always on electric bass.