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  1. #1

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    Hi everyone!

    We all know the terrible feeling of being disappointed about our own achievements after a bad gig. ”The guitar didn’t cut through the mix”, ”I was soloing one bar behind the rest of the band” and ”My tone was far too bad this time” are all examples that can create enormous frustration inside our brains. For some musicians it happens rarely and for some musicians it happens often. Therefore, everyone have their own checklists to handle disappointment after a bad gig. How do you handle disappointment after a bad gig?

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  3. #2

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    I try to overcome the non-productive emotional scripts (all the variations of “I’m a failure”), try to view the situation with a bit of detachment (as if it were someone else seeking your advice), and ask “what can I learn from this?” Of course, self-prescribing isn’t always the best idea, so it’s good to actually seek advice from a trusted teacher or mentor.

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by KirkP
    I try to overcome the non-productive emotional scripts (all the variations of “I’m a failure”), try to view the situation with a bit of detachment (as if it were someone else seeking your advice), and ask “what can I learn from this?” Of course, self-prescribing isn’t always the best idea, so it’s good to actually seek advice from a trusted teacher or mentor.
    Exactly! Mistakes are going to happen. Don't beat yourself up about it. You'll have many more chances to redeem yourself. Analyze the situation and use it as a learning opportunity. "All of your sorrows are joys....". Don't let the bastards get you down! "Pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and start all over again...."

  5. #4

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    I don't have as much professional experience as many on the forum. Consider that when you read what I write.

    There will be bad gigs. The inevitable cost of putting yourself out there is failure from time to time. Sometimes a band mate embarrasses you (drugs, booze, not showing up, not being prepared). Sometimes the synchrony among the players is off. Sometimes it's you missing a riff or unable to come up with anything besides scales that match the chord of the moment (or don't match).

    I am convinced that failure is a normal part of life in anyone who tries hard. If you doubt that, watch a baby learn to walk or a kid start to ride a bike. With music, you constantly push the envelope if you want to keep it interesting. So it won't work always.

    Switch to another activity- baseball. Michigan's beloved Ty Cobb was one of the greatest hitters ever. Ever! He got a hit about 37% of his at bats.

    The greatest free throw shooters still miss 10% of the time. It is exactly the same activity that they've done thousands of times.

    I just saw a concert where the guitarist clearly screwed up for about 10-15 seconds. He knew it and shook his head while he was trying to catch up to the beat and he missed more notes. He smiled to the audience and shrugged his shoulders. This musician was a seasoned professional, so he continued on and brushed off his mistake. I found that endearing actually.

    If you want perfection, you can't use humans. If you are afraid of making a mistake, don't perform.

    I spent a little time helping Jerry Reed. He's a fast player. His recordings are pretty precise. His live performances were less so. Yet 99% of the audience just heard Jerry playing amazingly fast and loved it. Professional musicians who heard the mistakes were forgiving and understood. Only a few insecure, ill mannered jerks were critical.

    Here's a video of Jerry in his prime with what looks like a British Keanu Reeves near-clone. I show this one because Jerry was not technically perfect if you listen closely. Jerry knew that but few others noticed, and if they did, they still loved it.




  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marty Grass
    I spent a little time helping Jerry Reed. He's a fast player. His recordings are pretty precise. His live performances were less so. Yet 99% of the audience just heard Jerry playing amazingly fast and loved it. Professional musicians who heard the mistakes were forgiving and understood. Only a few insecure, ill mannered jerks were critical.
    You knew him? I'm envious. All of my favourites save one are dead; and I really would have loved to see Jerry Reed. As to perfection in live playing - or even recorded, depending on the kind of style or spirit of the piece - you're right. Who goes to concerts for that? The joy is in hearing & seeing someone you like in action, isn't it? Enjoyed yourself = good gig.

    But on flubs: one thing that baffles me is why it should be that I can - and often will - bungle stuff (that I can otherwise play with my eyes closed while doing backwards saltos) when only a few people are present, yet shake out of my fingers with ease - although imprecisely sometimes - when in front of, say a dozen people or more? It's infuriating; every time I happen on something really nice that I only want to show to someone down the hall - not show off at all - it's as if I'm playing with my feet all of a sudden. I've no stagefright, and don't mind messing up in public, but somehow the quiet attention (not even scrutiny, as I'm not showing it to musicians) of only a few bothers me.
    Last edited by Zina; 12-07-2019 at 12:18 PM. Reason: added question

  7. #6

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    It all goes back to the wise words of the noted improviser Jerry Garcia: "What you hear when you're playing, what you hear when you play it back on tape and what they audience hears are three totally different things."

    Even after unsatisfactory moments playing, I try to bear in mind that somebody out in that audience had the most meaningful experience they will get all month.

    It's a privilege to play music for people. It's not just about me.

  8. #7

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    I can hear the faint voice reminding me that it's a learning experience and to extract lessons from it. But, tbh, I usually feel pretty bad.

  9. #8

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    There's no 'how to handle it', you just handle it.

  10. #9

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    Most of the pros I admire play sets that seem perfect.

    But, some of the pros I admire, and other players admire, names you'd know, flub notes. I don't hear clams very often, but poorly fretted notes and passages that aren't perfectly in time (thinking about a show with a prominent player who probably didn't nail a single up tempo line all night) do happen. I won't name them here because I don't want to have a searchable negative review because a player had a bad night, but it happens.

    I wonder how the pros handle it?

  11. #10

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    I wouldn't consider myself a pro yet. But there was one time where I had to learn a setlist of around 10 songs (pop oriented) for around 5 days - a week for a birthday party. I skipped basically a day of practice. I was pretty awful at the gig, one song I did alright but the rest went out of order with the setlist (and probably in different keys too!). It was a group thing and I didn't know about the change in setlist. I did my best to play along but I wasn't playing how the songs are supposed to sound like (which in pop is pretty important I think).

    If there is any lesson from this is to never skip a day of practice when you have a gig coming up soon. Have I haven't underestimated the gig I probably would have done way it better. I have heard stories of master players doing awful at gigs (albeit rare) and I heard some recordings of them that leave a lot to be desired. Nobody is perfect, might as well learn from it and do better next time!

  12. #11

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    I'm always well prepared, so it's never a train wreck, but I make mistakes all the time, because I play all the time. I'm probably the only one that notices, I don't sweat it. You can't play jazz and be afraid of mistakes.

  13. #12

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    I guess I just try to get over it, learn whatever can be learned from it, make necessary adjustments. If it can't be easily improved now it can always be better next time.
    Also I think great, when convenient, to have a close friend, bandmate, etc, whose judgment you respect* (*key word), to reflect with, give sound constructive criticism.

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo
    You can't play jazz and be afraid of mistakes.
    I screw it, it's been posted a zillion times, but I can't help myself .. Remember that Jazz is mistakes! (at 1:52)


  15. #14

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    I'm 59 now and have started playing publicly at age 13 (music school events) , going pro at 24. Quite a long time and many mistakes, many bad gigs, even veritable train-wrecks along the way and I'm still doin' it ! For a living so I have little choice...So, I have a rather differentiated view regarding the topic of "disappointment" after a "bad" gig/performance. When I do a background solo gig at a restaurant/event I generally view this as a paid practice session where I'm supposed to take care of the athmosphere in the place. I can make as many mistakes as I like because I'm the only one (most likely) who will notice them - I'm referring to the occasional bad note, buzzes, slips, timing errors etc. but not blatant blunders. I go home disappointed when my performance did not meet my own standard of "excellence" and when that happens it usually results in more practicing at home. The bad feeling goes away quickly.

    Last tuesday I was invited to a session where I didn't know the other players (bs, dr + sax) - they called a few tunes that I was not very familiar with and we also did a few in a different rhythmic style - THAT threw me off and I had to really struggle keeping up with the drummer  and the bass- who played un-amplified which did not make it any easier. It did not feel good and I thought my playing was under par but to my surprise the other guys and parts of the audience commended me after the gig about my playing, the sound I got and that my playing really helped the overall sound of the group. So my initial disappointment was purely subjective and unnecessary. Perceptions differ, always.
    I get angry and disappointed when my fellow players come to the gig un-prepared, don't care for the paying guests, come un-tidy, too late, when the money is bad even though the client could easily afford to pay more (only when I'm not responsible for the gig) - that sort of thing which you normally don't have any control over. I have to accept certain things and keep smiling. Sometimes I decide not to call certain musicians any more or I even turn down gigs when I know that it could be overly problematic , for any number of reasons.

    The older I get, the better I can handle these pitfalls (avoiding them, too), shrug it off, re-adjust my crown and carry on.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by gitman
    ... I get angry and disappointed when my fellow players come to the gig un-prepared, don't care for the paying guests, come un-tidy, too late, ...
    Isn't that weird? I've seen people do that (only in big cities, though), and just can't imagine how they didn't sink through the floor from embarrassment. Unkempt, bored, clothes you wouldn't wish on a toddler. When I went to compliment the band afterwards I ignored them (the scruffy arrogant ones); I hope they got the message. It's distasteful.

  17. #16

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    And let's not forget to put things in perspective. There's "I/We didn't do our best" which is regrettable, but also recoverable. Then there are other things that tend to put a damper on the evening. Did you get paid? Good gig. Were you stiffed, or did you have to negotiate for a settlement at 3 AM? Bad gig. Were the cops called? BG. Was the Emergency Room involved? BG. I could go on at some length, but I'll spare you. I wish and hope that all JGOers will not experience these type of occurrences.

  18. #17

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    Look at a bad gig as an opportunity to address every issue you have with the gig. What can we or you do to correct this? Have a band meeting and be honest with each other. If you are good friends you'll be able to handle constructive criticism. Respect each others strength and weaknesses and find a way to address each. Is someone drinking/drugging too much? Is the PA cutting it? Is my equipment cutting it? Are we playing a tune that is over our capabilities? It's an opportunity to address problems and make yourself better.

  19. #18

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    I just go home and play guitar. Later i might think what the reasons were, and go from there. If it was me, practice more! If it was something or someone else, choose wiser in the future!

  20. #19

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    Yea... some cool replys... Different Gigs, different expectations. Big venue well paid gigs, yea no room for mistakes. I'm also a pro from the stone ages.

    I mean show rehearsed gigs, festivals etc... and you make stupid or careless technical mistakes. It is on you, or me. But playing jazz generally isn't about seeing band replay rehearsed music from CD etc... it can be about improv, not so much anymore. But it's still going on and part of that approach to performing jazz is to push, play and interact with the other musicians and create LIVE music.

    Your putting yourself and the band on the edge of crash and burn... the other small detail, after millions of gigs, you learn how to crash and land. Which becomes part of the entertainment.

  21. #20

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    "Failure is preparation for success."if you are pushing and growing your skills as a jazz musician, you will make mistakes.

    In one video, "Evening With Jie Pass," Joe past talks about mistakes as part of why he doesn't like to have an amp right behind him; it makes the mistakes more audible and he doesn't want to hear that. Going through the house PA that was a little less immediate to him. So if Joe freaking Pass has a consideration for the possibility of making mistakes, I guess the rest of us can too.

    In an interview or perhaps the Tal Farlow movie, Tal talked about the distress of playing a bad gig. It happens to top drawer pros, as well, although I suspect their notion of a bad gig probably still sounded way better than my best gigs ever. Apparently Allan Holdsworth was so self-critical that he would apologize to the audience in the middle of a gig, saying something like "I'm sorry you had to hear that."

  22. #21

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    Joe said that there was a flub in everything he's ever done. 'It's my trademark' he used to say.

  23. #22

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    It's over - move on. If the leader calls you again, that means you did OK. The crowd is only there to drink and visit - they think Uncle Joe's cousin Fred's kid, Waldo, back home who plays Wildwood Flower, is the greatest thing since canned beer and girls; they don't know the difference. I wish I had a quarter for every drunk in the local saloon who told me, "boy, you should be in Nashville". Put it in perspective - it's not rocket surgery - do your best and learn from your mistakes and do better next time - it's not something to beat yourself up over. Chet (Atkins) said if you play a wrong note, play it again on the next chorus and they'll think it's jazz and you did it on purpose. Probably nobody noticed but you, anyway. Finish the gig, load the equipment (even help the drummer), shake everybody's hand, get paid, then go to the local diner for ham and eggs. Tomorrow's another day.

  24. #23

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    I already advised something in the similar situation...

    bourbon (or as Fulkner usedto say if there is not bourbon '' between nothing and scotch I choose scotch'')

    Seriously there are situations that we have to learn to handle ourselves without checklists, shortcuts, tricks and tips.


    For some musicians it happens rarely and for some musicians it happens often
    all the pros I know who play often just learn to ignore that feeling, some for better, some for worse ...

    Those who do it for bette r- they just can move away negative impression and focus on their problems to fix (whatever it is: music,organization, socialization --- sometimes may be even decision not to play in publuc for a while...) they treat their impression seriously but they do let it to ruin them.

    Those who do it for worse (majority - unfortunately!) -- they just use it as self-protective tool.... if you feel shame there are two ways you either correct something or you become shameless.... they choose the second.

    Modern practice allows it -- the ausdience and colleagues are very tolerant... you can lag and make mistakes for years and still be there.

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Skip Ellis
    ... Chet (Atkins) said if you play a wrong note, play it again on the next chorus and they'll think it's jazz and you did it on purpose ...
    I did that from the beginning until I realised some people haven't heard jazz. Then I started to kick my amplifier (machine gave me a Bb instead of a C, like when you select trailmix, but it gives you Smarties) or shake the lead (I played the right note, but it's probably still stuck in there). For unamplified playing though, I have no choice but to scowl at a fellow player if there is one (the drummer is safe; can't see you rolling your eyes). However, sometimes there are players in the audience. In that case I say it's because of cultural or religious difference, depending on their insistence and/or gullibility. Surefire.

  26. #25

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    At my amateur level, a “bad gig” isn’t when I’ve made too many mistakes, it’s when nothing seems to click and there seems to be no way to pull things together. Fortunately that hasn’t happened too often in gigs, but has in jams.
    Things that can set if off for me:
    1) When the acoustics and/or noise levels are awful,
    2) When one or more bandmate’s sense of time or harmony is off,
    3) When I don’t know (or like) the repertoire as well as I thought I did,
    4) When there’s something about the gig or perhaps something going on in my life that has given me low expectations about it.
    I’ve learned to keep those factors in the back of my mind before I accept a gig I’m not sure about.

  27. #26

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    There is a story that I have heard from a young (at the time) guitarist who, at the end of the set, went out in the audience and found someone like Barney Kessel or Kenny Burrell in the audience. Hr immediately apologized for all of his mistakes, commenting that it wasn't what he was trying to play. The senior musician looked at him and said "I heard what you actually played and it sounded fine." A lot of times what we think of as mistakes are things that didn't come out as we planned them but that doesn't mean they didn't come out OK.

  28. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by KirkP
    At my amateur level, a “bad gig” isn’t when I’ve made too many mistakes, it’s when nothing seems to click and there seems to be no way to pull things together. Fortunately that hasn’t happened too often in gigs, but has in jams.
    Things that can set if off for me:
    1) When the acoustics and/or noise levels are awful,
    2) When one or more bandmate’s sense of time or harmony is off,
    3) When I don’t know (or like) the repertoire as well as I thought I did,
    4) When there’s something about the gig or perhaps something going on in my life that has given me low expectations about it.
    I’ve learned to keep those factors in the back of my mind before I accept a gig I’m not sure about.
    It's very close to my expereience.... after all I came to the point that gigging as amateur I must choose carefully: I have enough BS in my daytime job, with music I just want to be happy.

  29. #28

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    I play 5 nights a week and have for many years... we all make mistakes every night. No one cares... especially not the audience.

    If you're in a band where someone is going to hold your bad notes against you then you're in the wrong band.

    There is the whole idea that there isn't a bad note. To me that doesn't mean that they all sound good all the time, but instead it means that I should never feel bad about a note I didn't like the sound of. Let it slide and learn from it.

  30. #29

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    I've been playing professionally a long time. I feel great after a good gig and terrible after a bad one, because I love music and always want it to be the best.
    When improvising freely, I make mistakes by maybe not hitting the note I was going for or playing something that didn't work out. These kind of mistakes can often be finessed into something that sounds good, or even creative!
    Then there are the obvious, painful clams....hey, it happens! A couple of these a night are not going to get me too upset but they usually indicate that my concentration level is not where I need it to be.

    What really makes for a bad night is when I just can't get in the "zone", usually due to bad sound, distractions or bad playing on somebody's part. Hopefully these things can be addressed during a break. Sometimes not.
    I deal with it by working on the factors that I can control and try to improve the next time. If several bad nights are the result of somebody else not having it together, I will have to look for other people to play with.

  31. #30

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    I came in early to my gig the other night, which was a Jazz Christmas Party with a great big band I'm lucky enough to play with. After talking with some of the guys, I start to set up, and I realize I didn't put the power cord I use in my gig bag. I start asking the guys in the rhythm section if they have an extra power cord, but no one had one. It was raining really bad, but I had to check if I had an extra one in my car.

    I got soaked, but I found an old computer cord I had in my trunk for just this situation. By the time I got back to the club, they were in the middle of a tune, so I didn't have time to tune up, and just figured out where they were in the chart, and played. The next chart started with a guitar solo on top of the band, and something sounded funny. Then I had another solo in the same tune, and something still sounded funny.
    After the tune, I checked my tuner, and I was way out of tune, because I had just put some new strings on, and they just meandered out of tune. I apologized to a few of the guys, but they said they didn't notice, so I felt better. I forgot to apologize to the lead alto player who's a heavy dude, but it's too late now... The rest of the gig went fine, but you have to accept that things can always go wrong...

  32. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim
    I came in early to my gig the other night, which was a Jazz Christmas Party with a great big band I'm lucky enough to play with. After talking with some of the guys, I start to set up, and I realize I didn't put the power cord I use in my gig bag. I start asking the guys in the rhythm section if they have an extra power cord, but no one had one. It was raining really bad, but I had to check if I had an extra one in my car.

    I got soaked, but I found an old computer cord I had in my trunk for just this situation. By the time I got back to the club, they were in the middle of a tune, so I didn't have time to tune up, and just figured out where they were in the chart, and played. The next chart started with a guitar solo on top of the band, and something sounded funny. Then I had another solo in the same tune, and something still sounded funny.
    After the tune, I checked my tuner, and I was way out of tune, because I had just put some new strings on, and they just meandered out of tune. I apologized to a few of the guys, but they said they didn't notice, so I felt better. I forgot to apologize to the lead alto player who's a heavy dude, but it's too late now... The rest of the gig went fine, but you have to accept that things can always go wrong...
    sorry s, but in the immortal words of william shatner..."sabatage!!! " you sabotaged yourself...forgotten cables, new non broken in strings..why would you do that to yourself? i know guys that carry 2 of everything for their gigs!

    hah

    cheers

  33. #32

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    "Probably nobody noticed but you, anyway."

    At rehearsal last night I was talking w/the organ player about a tenor player we work with.
    Cool cat but has a habit of exacerbating any mistakes by rolling his eyes, pulling the horn out of his mouth, etc.
    In reality, mistakes are rarely noticed by the audience, usually it's only the cats on the bandstand, no need to draw attention to them imo.

    Myself, if I play a not so perfect change, or whatever, I'll make a mental note of it and fix it when I get home from the gig.

    There's a lot of tunes to know, a lot of notes, a lot of chords, tricky arrangements to remember, mistakes are bound to happen, how you handle/address them can make all the difference in that performance and your next.
    Play on!

  34. #33

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    Just as an aside, I remember a gig I did w/a local prominent organ player a long time ago.
    He heard me at a gig and hired me, I was anxious to work w/ him.
    We started the 1st tune, an uptempo blues, and right away I noticed something didn't sound right, we weren't in tune.
    I check my guitar in the middle of the tune w/my tuner, I'm ok.
    But it's not possible for a Hammond B3 to be out is it?
    Someone came up and put three $50 bills in the tip jar and said "you guys were smokin' but something didn't sound right"
    I told the organ player to restart the organ. Because he didn't let it properly warm up the tone wheel generator didn't spin at the correct rate and as a result he was a 1/2 step flat!
    Hah, problem solved!

  35. #34

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    I have been playing for many years; guitar, bass, and mandolin, and have made mistakes in live shows with all of them. Sometimes, especially when I feel like I made some blatant mistakes that really had a negative impact on the performance, the same thing almost always happens. Audience members will come up after the show and tell us how great we sounded. About that time I am thinking to myself; "I wonder which show they were watching". But the old adage "only we recognize the mistakes" usually holds true. I think the audience often chalks mistakes up to thinking that we have just tried to "personalize" the song with little changes, and they are OK with that.

    When other band members mention their mistakes to me after a show, I usually give them my standard answer; "hey, the sun will come up tomorrow and it will be OK". Of course, I hate to make mistakes, especially on songs that I have played many, many times. But that's the nature of the business. I read in another thread today about national acts using backing tracks at live concerts to enhance their performance, and usually click tracks to keep their timing correct. Personally, I prefer to hear all live music even with the occasional "clam" rather than hearing the band play along with a backing track.

    Thump on,

    One_Dude

  36. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by citizenk74
    Exactly! Mistakes are going to happen. Don't beat yourself up about it. You'll have many more chances to redeem yourself. Analyze the situation and use it as a learning opportunity. "All of your sorrows are joys....". Don't let the bastards get you down! "Pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and start all over again...."
    Mistakes are also places where we can learn. When you make one in front of a crowd you have no choice but to recover. It's better to make those mistakes in private (I always spend some practice time in improv both with and without backing), precisely because when the inevitable happens onstage I'll be more prepared for it, and also through those mistakes hopefully find a different way of hearing things.

    Me, my attitude is --



    A bad gig happens. I do a failure analysis, see what got short shrift, and then get to work.

  37. #36

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    One thing I learned is that I have no reliable ability to judge the quality of the gig while I am playing it.

    that helps.

  38. #37

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    Last edited by cosmic gumbo; 04-08-2020 at 02:09 AM.

  39. #38

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    Meh. Everyone makes mistakes.

    Dress sharp. It's what most people notice.

  40. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by darkwaters
    Meh. Everyone makes mistakes.

    Dress sharp. It's what most people notice.
    Truth!

  41. #40

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    God, I laughed my butt off when I saw this post! Really needed to laugh today. Thanks for the humor.

    Fred

  42. #41

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    So, yes we have all made tons of mistakes on gigs over the years. I agree that mistakes can help us learn to correct how we approach a tune. Maybe its a chord voicing or how I start an improv. But, you know, I have made mistakes on tunes that I have played for years, including ones that I have never made before. Sometimes, stuff just happens that we can't control or even predict. If I am reading a chart and the lightening is off just a bit or the stand is just a little too far away, I will misread a measure or two. Once, about 10 years ago, I was playing an acoustic guitar on a gig and my right thumb locked up....right in the middle of the tune I was playing. Had never happened before. Not sure I did anything different, but after about 10-15 seconds, it snapped back in. Fortunately, there was another guitar player and keyboard player in the group, so all was well.

    I used to beat myself up all the time when I screwed up. I was way harder on myself than I was on anyone else. But then one day, an older player told me that when you play live, mistakes always happen. Just learn how to cover them quickly and figure out how not to make them again. But, be prepared (or not) to make others in the future. It was great advice and once I finally absorbed it, was able to relax more.

    Or better yet, when you realize that you have made a mistake once, repeat it two or three times so the audience will figure that it's part of the tune. And keep smiling. Not sure I ever bought into this but I guess it works for some.

  43. #42

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    I would just like to have gigs again, even if I were obligated to play badly. I miss gigs...but stay at home is stay at home.

  44. #43

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    That sinking feeling when

    ...you forgot the bridge to Have You Met Miss Jones...
    ...The Girl From Ipanema, you thought you were in the repeat of the A melody (F) and the band is already on F#... it clashes like hell
    ...the band leader counts off a blues and you realize you don’t know if it’s an F blues or Bb
    ...the band leader points at you at the bridge to rhythm changes and you freeze up
    ...the band is trading fours and you get lost in the song structure.

    i could go on for hours...

    I try to be as positive as possible and not hide my mistakes. I make a funny face and let the audience have a laugh. Relaxes me too.

    but sometimes you can really get that sinking feeling and it can last you a long time.

    a last one:
    ...the band plays Jordu and the soloist before you plays the bridge so well that you become really self conscious when the bridge approaches.
    oh yes... this one
    ...the band plays Autumn Leaves in C...

  45. #44

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    you got to imagine profesional sports teams , playing a lot. when the game is over, of course you have to reflect on mistakes but you cant take fretting over it into the next game.

    and , yes, the people dont know half the time, i always think its funny when you play with people and make a mistake, and most people try to help you cover and keep smiling , but there are always those type of people who make it a big deal to stare at you in front of everyone like they are disapointed in what you did.

    i actualy saw tony williams do this haha

  46. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by bonsritmos
    you got to imagine profesional sports teams , playing a lot. when the game is over, of course you have to reflect on mistakes but you cant take fretting over it into the next game.

    and , yes, the people dont know half the time, i always think its funny when you play with people and make a mistake, and most people try to help you cover and keep smiling , but there are always those type of people who make it a big deal to stare at you in front of everyone like they are disapointed in what you did.

    i actualy saw tony williams do this haha
    As a rock guitarist, my experience was that most of the time the audience didn't notice a mistake unless it was a real stinker ... or someone in the band mad-dogged you, lol.