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  1. #1

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    Im having really bad time playing on the band stand,my hands shake,i sweat,sometimes my mind stops for a second so i get lost in a song..
    any advice..
    maybe practice routine is not good..
    anything will mean a bunch..

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  3. #2

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    1) 2) I think we've all been there, to one degree or another. You might want to look into relaxation techniques (breathing exercises, mantras, and so forth). It might help to keep in mind that the people you are playing for are probably more interested in the music you play than in making any adverse judgements about the people playing. The audience is basically on your side to begin with.
    Try to focus your attention on the music. Remember that your band is your support group, or should be. Lock in on the drummer (I personally focus on the hi-hat).

    Above all, avoid the "liquid courage" temptation. If you cannot stick to a personal limit, abstain.

    I hope this helps.

  4. #3

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  5. #4

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    Remember that, I assume, you are doing this for fun.

  6. #5

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    I've played thousands of gigs, and am pretty relaxed on the bandstand. But playing with new musicians or new material can still be a challenge.

    My best advice is to practice the material you're going to perform and then practice some more. Practice until you can relax and play it without effort. There are always distractions at a gig and, if you know the material cold, you can deal with them and still play. And if you make a mistake, you'll be able to pick up and carry on.

    I've heard some of my favorite guitar players hit the occasional horrendous clam. Nobody died, nobody got hurt! The only people that are listening close enough to catch most of your mistakes are other musicians, and they know that it's just something that happens.

    The problem with nervousness is that it takes you out of the "zone" you need to be in to do your best. Focus on your playing until that's all that matters. Don't worry about people's judgement. Most of them aren't even listening, much less judging you!
    Last edited by Gilpy; 12-30-2018 at 09:21 PM.

  7. #6

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    There's a great and much used book called " The inner game of music " that deals with nerves and other issues surrounding the psychology of music-making . It used to be required reading at conservatories and music colleges .

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pycroft
    There's a great and much used book called " The inner game of music " that deals with nerves and other issues surrounding the psychology of music-making . It used to be required reading at conservatories and music colleges .
    One guitarist I respect said he found “The Inner Game of Tennis” much more useful, even for a musician. I’ve been meaning to read it, and this reminded me. I just now checked it out from the library. I’ll try to report back here if I like it. Here’s an excerpt that caught my eye from the introduction.

    Look for lots of opportunities to play with others in low-risk situations. Living room or community center jams can help build confidence. If you can’t find jazz jams, try to find jam partners through local teachers or craigslist ads. Folk jams are one way to build confidence playing in public, since with simple music you can more easily turn off your analytical brain and just play.

    I’ve also found that streaming tunes at random at performance volume and just trying to play along with each tune that comes up without thinking too hard helps prepare the mind for the experience on the bandstand. If a tune is too difficult I’ll just skip ahead to the next tune, and sometimes I’ll restart a tune if I want to take another run at it. But the more I do this the easier it gets, and I can begin to anticipate what’s coming next and what might sound good with it. It’s not quite like being on the bandstand, but it gives you part of the experience.
    Last edited by KirkP; 12-30-2018 at 02:59 PM.

  9. #8

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    Still happens sometimes, after all these years.

    Most groups I play with start with something easy. Gives me a chance to tweak my settings so the guitar sounds right, which is helpful. But, I still probably play better in the second set when I'm more relaxed.

    There are medications that some performers use for stage fright. I don't know about safety or effectiveness.

    I also think that who you're playing with matters. Some players make me more nervous than others. It doesn't have anything to do with skill level, IMO, rather, it's more of a personality thing. When I'm the leader, I try to have people who make me relaxed.

  10. #9
    thank you,it helped in a way that i'm trying to figure out the way to relax .I also noticed that i tend to get overexcited and when it combines with fright it's hell..
    i'll work on it anyway
    thanks a bunch.
    regards P.

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by jujupavle
    thank you,it helped in a way that i'm trying to figure out the way to relax .I also noticed that i tend to get overexcited and when it combines with fright it's hell..
    i'll work on it anyway
    thanks a bunch.
    regards P.
    Hang in there!

  12. #11

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    The more you do it the easier it becomes.

    If you weren't a little nervous then your not doing it right.

    Leave the "I'm going to miss a note or play or sing a sour note" behind.

    You ARE going to miss a note and play or sing a sour note, just keep on going and don't ever apologize. Make a mental note and fix it before the next time.

    My philosophy: The only musician I have to be better than is the musician I was yesterday"

  13. #12

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    A former teacher, (and great Manouche player) told me, "remember everyone there wants you to do well, no one is hoping you crash and burn". Something like that. The audience is not your enemy. They want you to do well and all have a good time. I think most audiences are very forgiving about a players nervousness.

  14. #13

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    Relax, it’s jazz, the average audience can’t tell a wrong note anyway.

  15. #14

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    Last little gig just a while ago I was pumped up with adrenaline because I had 5 minutes to set up the amp and mic but it stayed silent and I had to start without. So I played unplugged without any warm up, but boiling inside. The 1st piece was the Brouwer's etude nr 6. The audience didn't notice that half of the notes were missing. Took a while to calm down but it went ok overall. Yeah, no reason to imagine what the audience may think of you. It's always something else . Clothing even.. or "why you smile so little"...

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by citizenk74
    1) 2) I think we've all been there, to one degree or another. You might want to look into relaxation techniques (breathing exercises, mantras, and so forth). It might help to keep in mind that the people you are playing for are probably more interested in the music you play than in making any adverse judgements about the people playing. The audience is basically on your side to begin with.
    Try to focus your attention on the music. Remember that your band is your support group, or should be. Lock in on the drummer (I personally focus on the hi-hat).

    Above all, avoid the "liquid courage" temptation. If you cannot stick to a personal limit, abstain.

    I hope this helps.
    This is some of the most soundadvice I have heard regarding 'stage fright' . . . thanks!

  17. #16

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    The more you do it, the easier it gets!

    As for losing your place in the form, does that only happen when you are playing live or does it also happen when you are practicing tunes or jamming with others? I remember when I used to get lost in the form years ago - even after I mostly mastered forms in practice or jamming it still took a while to get to where I could do the same live. Just takes time.

  18. #17

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    I always need at least 3 songs to adjust. Adjust the amp, the guitar, sheetmusic, the ambiance, the guitar cable, the light, the beer, the balance between me and the bass and drums etc. I can't expect that to be right in the first song. So after all those years, I have grown to the feeling that the first songs do not go as I wish. And I know it will be better after that. I have a huge respect for the psych and body, but when it comes to those stupid nerves, I don't take them very serious anymore. And I try not to think to much about them. Don't take that fright too serious.

    HAns

  19. #18
    I just find it hard to put in the words,how thankful and grateful I am for having you people here when I need you.

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by jujupavle
    I just find it hard to put in the words,how thankful and grateful I am for having you people here when I need you.
    I read all the posts here before my first gig last night. Second tune up was a Bossa heavy tune and I couldn't get my right hand to behave and my left hand was sweaty and it all felt very odd. Managed to lose me place in the form and had a super hot light in my face.

    BUT I tried to breath, relax and listen to the music and when I got my head up and interacted with the band, it went a lot better. Loads to improve, of course, but looking forward to getting back in asap.

    Thanks to everyone who shared their advice.

  21. #20

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    This passage from Kenny Werner’s “Effortless Mastery: Liberating the Musician Within” put music in perspective and helped me learn to relax and enjoy myself more when performing.

    "Here is a very simple test to prove that music is not that important: Go to the kitchen and get a plastic bag. Place it over your head, tying the opening snugly around your neck so that no air can get through. Now, let’s count to one hundred. By the count of twenty, let me ask you: how important is music? Are there any ”burning issues”? Is Charlie Parker important? By the count of 35, would you be debating whether or not bebop was the real music? By 54, no doubt you would be contemplating whether music should swing, or whether free jazz really is where it’s at. At 73, the question would burn in your consciousness; ”Is Cecil Taylor for real?” I think you get the point. The only thing that’s really important is your next breath. We lose sight of reality very easily because of the little dictator in our heads: the mind. Our mind is always feeding us messages: ”I must sound good;” ”This is the right music, that is the wrong music;” ”This is valid jazz, that is politically correct jazz” (yes, we have that these days). Or it sends us messages like: ”I’m not supposed to play really great, because I’m a woman,” or ”I’m white,” or ”I’m European,” or ”only guys who live in New York can really play,” or ”I’m too old, and I can’t learn to play any better.” The mind is always supplying a steady stream of these illusions of limitation. They don’t happen to be true, but they prevent you from seeing or hearing truth. Music is the Icing on the Cake The truth is that every breath is a gift, and playing music is optional. For the people in Somalia, food, not bebop, is important. For the people of Bosnia, it’s peace. The absence of pain is important. Food, shelter, clean air, clean water, clothes to wear: these are more important than musical concerns, if not music itself. Music is not the cake. It’s the icing on the cake. It is one of the enjoyments provided for us on this planet, in this life. In the overall scheme of things, your level of proficiency is not important. Remember that you can benefit from realizing this, because if you decide it’s not so important, YOU MIGHT PLAY A LOT BETTER!"

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulD
    Go to the kitchen and get a plastic bag. Place it over your head, tying the opening snugly around your neck so that no air can get through.
    are you fucking kidding me

  23. #22

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    Um...it's a thought exercise, you're not supposed to do it literally. Relax

  24. #23

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  25. #24

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    I remember reading through Effortless Mastery while I was working in the print department of a music shop. I'm not entirely into the whole meditation/yoga thing but there were certainly a significant number of paragraphs like the one above that helped me get over the daily inner struggle with self-acceptance / doubt etc. that have carried over into my performance mindset.

    Of course, it all gets easier the more you perform, especially if you're performing with familiar faces/repertoire/location. I've found that the more I play a room, the more I feel like the room is "mine" and that there's less to prove. Last year I wasn't playing as much, so it was noticeable that whenever I played out I would have more tension and thus, to my mind, sounded much worse than in the practice room. There's something to be said for practicing "performing", either by actually performing, or by recording a take of something front to back without stopping, which for me seems to kick in those terrible gears that say "Don't screw up!!! One bad note and you redo!".

  26. #25

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    I got this advice from Mick Goodrick, I think it originated with Gary Burton. The idea is instead of trying to change how you're feeling, change how you feel about about how you're feeling. Instead of labeling your body's responses as 'nervousness' (stage FRIGHT) and fighting them, look at it as your body ramping up to deliver the best performance you can (stage ENERGY) and go with it. Not that you don't want to 'relax', but think about relaxing within your heightened state of energy, and not fighting it. Best wishes for your music!

    PK

  27. #26

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    Old thread but this seems good advice....


  28. #27

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    For me, fortunately, it has never happened (at least not in a very very long time). In the first place, I feel that the audience is there to hear me do something that they can't do and wish they could (the occasional musician in the audience is immaterial to me - I don't play to them). In the second place, before I perform a piece to an audience, I've practiced it to the point that I'm so sick of it that I never want to hear it again. I do get a few butterflies on opening night of a theater production but that's more the result of willing all the pieces (music, lighting, actors, sound, blocking, etc) to come together as they should, but not as a result of , my lack of preparation.

  29. #28

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    Forget all the hocus pocus! If you know your material, it won't happen. Yes, everyone flubs a few notes or chords but you shouldn't become catatonic. I remember my early days as a guitar banger in the Pleistocene Era when our entire gig was playing 1/4/5 progressions: Louie Louie, Johnny B. Good, Devil with the Blue Dress, Hold on, I'm Coming, Mustang Sally, etc. Then, we really got creative when we threw in some minor chords: Summertime, House of the Rising Sun. I don't know how you can get stage fright when you've got it cold. However, as the music becomes more complex, the dynamics will change but the principle is the same. Know your stuff. When you really know it . . . you want people to listen. Good playing . . . Marinero

  30. #29

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    I never know when anxiety will hit---and screw up my flow. I've played before jazz royalty---nada, didn't bat an eyelash. A day later someone in the band, a musician or non-musician in the audience may look at me funny, or I think they did---in the toilet, or at least it won't be flowing the way it needs to.

    Yesterday there was an event in my building, a luncheon for residents. A Hispanic woman asked if there'd be Spanish music. I figured I'd go get my guitar and at least give her a little Besame Mucho while she and the others ate. When I came down with my as-yet-not set up and low volume acoustic, between the echo in the room and the current condition of my axe it was sub-par playing. I did play Besame Mucho for the nice lady (she sang along), and some other songs for maybe 20 minutes total. There was polite applause which was cool, but I was overdriving to hear myself, slamming strings and missing s*&t---mistakes galore. Out of tune like a MF. Yeah, a mild attack of stage fright in a totally nonthreatening setting. A tape was playing in my head: 'You sound like s*&t---and I was succumbing.

    I calmed down and sounded relatively like myself about 10 minutes in, and it was cool to play for my neighbors---who really had no clue what I do (though they see me leave most days with a guitar case).

    My point: nervousness/stage fright can show its ugly head anywhere, anytime. There's no predicting it, no rhyme or reason. That's the way of all emotions. They just 'are'. And tomorrow also 'is'---and probably no such problems..
    Last edited by joelf; 02-12-2020 at 11:41 PM.

  31. #30

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    every time I play on stage, it is the audience who gets fright

  32. #31

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    I hope im not resurrecting this thread but it was on the forum front page.

    I have played tons of gigs, and have a degree in performance, and you know what? I was real scared to play in front of people for a long time too.. even while getting my degree.. it stifled my ability to perform drastically.

    The way that I cured this was to set up "house shows" with neighbors (neighbors are of the same mind as regular listeners regardless of the fact that they know you personally) and get in front of them in the same professional manner that you would an audience in public.

    Have chairs set up, and you facing them, and perform the shit out of the music you play for those individuals... In my experience they still don't know when you mess up (or don't care).

    I should note, in my experience, it's VERY hard to play for 5 people who can see through the "stage situation" in a living room, rather than being on a stage. Stage settings separate you from your listener, and give you some breathing room. I did maybe five shows, with about 5-6 tunes (about one gigging set per show) and it didn't make a performer out of me... but it was a HUGE help.

    TL;DR. --

    do a house show for your neighbors once a week until you dont care that theyre listening anymore.

  33. #32

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    I once saw Martin Taylor playing solo at Ronnie Scott’s in what would have been a disastrous gig for most people. He came on and only played a couple of notes and suddenly the sound system failed. He wasn’t using an amp on stage, maybe he had a preamp into the PA or something. So he was left standing there unable to play, while the sound guy took about 20 minutes to fix the problem.

    But Martin stayed totally calm, joked about it, then started telling anecdotes about life on the road, playing with Stephane Grapelli, etc. He was so relaxed and entertaining that no-one minded that he wasn’t playing. The 20 minutes went by in no time, then when he started playing he had the audience totally on his side and he played brilliantly. I thought it showed total control, as presumably he had no idea how long it was going to take them to fix the problem.

    By contrast, when I saw Stanley Jordan there with a similar problem (although I think it was his own sound gear that failed), he got really rattled and started cursing his roadie, the sound guys, everything, right in front of the audience. When he was finally able to play, he had got in such a state that he gave off a really bad vibe, the gig didn’t really go very well.

  34. #33
    Yes, I agree. You perform for the audience. Some musicians offer constructive criticism, but others are eager to belittle you.

  35. #34

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    "I have played tons of gigs, and have a degree in performance, and you know what? I was real scared to play in front of people for a long time too.. even while getting my degree.. it stifled my ability to perform drastically." Thelonious

    Hi, T,
    Were you a classically trained musician? This is quite common when playing for academic juries and, usually, less common when playing in ensembles. I also play Classical Guitar and in the early days of study(CG) despite being a performer of popular music ,at that time, found it very intimidating to sit alone on a stage and perform for a jury. I could always finish the performance but ,usually, never felt I did my best. The best key is to play for others OFTEN and, yes, in a small setting as you described above. Today, I play exclusively solo and love it. What a difference a day makes! Good playing . . . Marinero

  36. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    .

    My point: nervousness/stage fright can show its ugly head anywhere, anytime. There's no predicting it, no rhyme or reason. That's the way of all emotions. They just 'are'. And tomorrow also 'is'---and probably no such problems..
    And today is one of those 'tomorrows'---playing my music exclusively with a good band at a favored venue. I'm not nervous, I'm pumped---and prepared...

  37. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    I never know when anxiety will hit---and screw up my flow. I've played before jazz royalty---nada, didn't bat an eyelash. A day later someone in the band, a musician or non-musician in the audience may look at me funny, or I think they did---in the toilet, or at least it won't be flowing the way it needs to.

    Yesterday there was an event in my building, a luncheon for residents. A Hispanic woman asked if there'd be Spanish music. I figured I'd go get my guitar and at least give her a little Besame Mucho while she and the others ate. When I came down with my as-yet-not set up and low volume acoustic, between the echo in the room and the current condition of my axe it was sub-par playing. I did play Besame Mucho for the nice lady (she sang along), and some other songs for maybe 20 minutes total. There was polite applause which was cool, but I was overdriving to hear myself, slamming strings and missing s*&t---mistakes galore. Out of tune like a MF. Yeah, a mild attack of stage fright in a totally nonthreatening setting. A tape was playing in my head: 'You sound like s*&t---and I was succumbing.

    I calmed down and sounded relatively like myself about 10 minutes in, and it was cool to play for my neighbors---who really had no clue what I do (though they see me leave most days with a guitar case).

    My point: nervousness/stage fright can show its ugly head anywhere, anytime. There's no predicting it, no rhyme or reason. That's the way of all emotions. They just 'are'. And tomorrow also 'is'---and probably no such problems..
    I never get stage fright. Almost.

    We were playing a Saturday night gig at a little roadhouse we called "The Bucket of Blood" (long story). We're in the middle of a set, the dance floor is packed, there's like one table left in the joint, I'm wailin' away on something, and the door opens. In walks my brother, my sister, their spouses, and my Dad and his CG. They had never heard me play, or shown much interest, TBH. Now, there was no alcohol in the home growing up, so this came as a bit of a shock.

    Well, all of a sudden I can't find the fingerboard, let alone notes. Words became garbled mouth noises as the room spun around me. People stopped dancing and turned around to gawk. Total trainwreck. Threw me off my game, for sure.

    So deep breath, a couple swallows of Mountain Dew, a nice chat with my family, and I was OK. Back to the bandstand and to form, and every body got home safe and the band got paid and that was that.

    Moral: This, too, shall pass.

  38. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by citizenk74
    I never get stage fright. Almost.

    We were playing a Saturday night gig at a little roadhouse we called "The Bucket of Blood" (long story). We're in the middle of a set, the dance floor is packed, there's like one table left in the joint, I'm wailin' away on something, and the door opens. In walks my brother, my sister, their spouses, and my Dad and his CG. They had never heard me play, or shown much interest, TBH. Now, there was no alcohol in the home growing up, so this came as a bit of a shock.

    Well, all of a sudden I can't find the fingerboard, let alone notes. Words became garbled mouth noises as the room spun around me. People stopped dancing and turned around to gawk. Total trainwreck. Threw me off my game, for sure.

    So deep breath, a couple swallows of Mountain Dew, a nice chat with my family, and I was OK. Back to the bandstand and to form, and every body got home safe and the band got paid and that was that.

    Moral: This, too, shall pass.
    Okay.

    Now----why do you call it 'The Bucket of Blood'?

  39. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero

    Hi, T,
    Were you a classically trained musician? This is quite common when playing for academic juries and, usually, less common when playing in ensembles. I also play Classical Guitar and in the early days of study(CG) despite being a performer of popular music ,at that time, found it very intimidating to sit alone on a stage and perform for a jury. I could always finish the performance but ,usually, never felt I did my best. The best key is to play for others OFTEN and, yes, in a small setting as you described above. Today, I play exclusively solo and love it. What a difference a day makes! Good playing . . . Marinero
    I actually had no real classical training and focused entirely on jazz guitar while I was in college. I did develop a classical rep, and did a few sections of bach's works and so forth but it almost seemed like a thing they didn't endorse, and merely had us do for the sake of knowing what it was in general (i felt like my teacher hated teaching me classical tbh).

    I really love classical and I really disliked college for music. The professors really didn't help me feel welcome and didn't make me feel valued or skilled at all. I have since stopped playing professionally for the foreseeable future, and have returned to my former profession as an engineer. I did complete my degree, and even in the end, there were many disagreeable moments... All this to say, school for music is probably the worst place in the world to gauge yourself because your around abnormal musicians like yourself who shed many hours.. most people want freebird type stupid shit so they can stare into the middle distance drunk...there are plenty of articles written about why jazz isn't as accepted culturally as it once was, and it comes down to people being scared of things they dont/cant understand both artistically and in life..maybe this can serve as a further reminder that no one hears you when you hear yourself "mess up."

    If you are here, you clearly care about your sound, and how you work on your craft and are trying to be the best you can.. Remind yourself that when you play, its them that should be grateful to get to listen to all you have worked for to sound your best.. I have to remind myself of this often, as we start to think.. and we get in this mindset "what if" and none of that is helpful...

    **you are great, and you will play great if you believe that, shed hard, and love what you do.. it's that simple.

  40. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    Okay.

    Now----why do you call it 'The Bucket of Blood'?
    There had been a death in the men's restroom. Whether it was murder or suicide was a matter of some debate, depending on who was telling the story. In both versions, there was a lot of blood involved.

    Then there was that time some college punks were making trouble and I got punched in the mouth with a full beer bottle, cleaving my upper lip in twain, before the flying glass nearly severed the ear of my drummer, who was behind me. Six stitches for my face, seven to re-attach my drummer's right ear, two hours waiting for the cops to arrive, another two in the E.R., and a couple of very unhappy (to say the least) wives. So that was more blood, mostly mine.

  41. #40

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    ^ yikes!! so how was the show??? haha..

    and here i thought it was a reference to something benign!

    (like this corman flick..with paul horn on sax) hah



    what doesn't kill you only makes you stronger!

    cheers

  42. #41

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    Well now visiting there is on my bucket list.

    I'm here through Thursday...

  43. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    Well now visiting there is on my bucket list.

    I'm here through Thursday...
    Sorry, Joel. I drove by there last week and the joint has been razed to the ground. I could direct you to other disreputable sites of interest. Lunch is on me. The restaurant where I used to play in a jazz trio has a Fra Diavalo Chicken that will melt your face. And the Baked Ziti is world class.

  44. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by citizenk74
    Sorry, Joel. I drove by there last week and the joint has been razed to the ground. I could direct you to other disreputable sites of interest. Lunch is on me. The restaurant where I used to play in a jazz trio has a Fra Diavalo Chicken that will melt your face. And the Baked Ziti is world class.
    The part I'll retain: 'lunch is on me'.

    Thank you, Daddy Long Legs!!

  45. #44

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    Nick Cave offers a raw narrative that mentions a bar called the Bucket Of Blood in his infamous rendition of Staggar Lee.

  46. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo
    Nick Cave offers a raw narrative that mentions a bar called the Bucket Of Blood in his infamous rendition of Staggar Lee.
    I suspect, given the fundamental nature of some of the places we find ourselves in in our professional capacities, that the moniker is not exactly rare.

  47. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    ^ yikes!! so how was the show??? haha..

    and here i thought it was a reference to something benign!

    (like this corman flick..with paul horn on sax) hah



    what doesn't kill you only makes you stronger!

    cheers
    One of my favorite directors ever! And the sax playing!

    What gives me stage fright is gear and the Murphy law.. My approach on performing live has more or less been this: When you play for people, make it about them, and make it about the music. Don't bother with the ego much, let it subside, with its expectations, ambitions and inhibitions.

    Prepare well, have gear that's in good working order, be honest. If you're a mediocre player or one that makes mistakes (and we all are in one style or another), bring those mistakes onstage with you and work with them. You are not presenting anything else other than you and your involvement with music, for better or worse. Smile through it.

    .. as long as it is not my classical guitar degree exams that is... that reminded me of The Pit And The Pendulum flick..

  48. #47

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    I will shortly be launching my new coaching website.

    Many guitarists on this forum had great results previously with my Benson Picking Tutorial. While I will be making that available again for anyone who thinks this is the time to shed, more importantly I will soon be providing a Tutorial on overcoming Stage Fright once and for all. As someone who also suffered severely from it until 1997 and was at breaking point trying to overcome it, I know what you are dealing with, and once I complete the new Tutorial, I believe you will get the results as many on here did with my Benson Picking Tutorial. If you want to make sure you are alerted when it is available, you are welcome do drop me a line so I don't miss you at: jcstyllesartistnews@jcstylles.com In the meantime, here is a recent performance of one of my groups at Smalls Jazz Club in New York City to lift your spirits:
    Cheers-JC Stylles

  49. #48

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    Preparation helps. To me, there is confidence in being overprepared, having the material down cold, having a few fallback solos if my mind suddenly blanks. To me, the key to feeling at home in the situation is to feel mastery of the material.

    secondly, once you have messed up in front of an audience on and off through a couple of decades, you learn that it isnt a big deal - something to be avoided, sure, but nobody gets hurt in any meaningful way. Only my pride . Dont fear what isnt dangerous