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  1. #101

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sandro View Post
    I will offer a live performance where I can connect with the audience and make them feel that I am playing just for them, some body is on the stage interacting with the audience just like a band will do play that song just for them at that moment in time, you can't do that with a recording. Now I am feeling that I am stating the obvious.

    Sandro
    Exactly. The people who should be concerned about what I do are DJs, not other musicians or bands. Many of my private event gigs were originally going to be hosted by DJs until they found out about me through word of mouth or seeing me play somewhere. They are often willing to pay MORE than they would have a DJ for the live experience. These are situations where a full band wasn't ever even a consideration.
    Last edited by EightString; 10-31-2014 at 01:48 PM.

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  3. #102

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    ^^^
    You think DJs are worried about you? haha

  4. #103

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stevebol View Post
    ^^^
    You think DJs are worried about you? haha
    I've taken many jobs away from them, whether they are worried or not.

  5. #104

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    Quote Originally Posted by EightString View Post
    I've taken many jobs away from them, whether they are worried or not.
    I guess that could be why some DJs are 'jazz interested' as the saying goes. They could be useful in jazz if they can get past the downsizing mentality. No one can draw like a DJ and they have the potential to be job creators. They have a skill-set. That's why they're in demand.

  6. #105

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    Quote Originally Posted by EightString View Post
    I've taken many jobs away from them, whether they are worried or not.
    In total sincerity, that is awesome.

    Even hip hop sounds better without the DJ:

    Sam Prather's Groove Orchestra brings jazz and bedroom production together into a danceable new sound - CapitalBopCapitalBop

  7. #106

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    ^^^
    Neo-Soul isn't dance music. It's not even close. I don't believe it's intended to be either. Strange title for the article. It's new jazz.
    Last edited by Stevebol; 10-31-2014 at 03:29 PM.

  8. #107

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    New jazz...is that like the new math?
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  9. #108

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vladan View Post
    RichB was right on the spot.

    Put yourself in a rock band position. Are rock bands playing of the backing tracks? No. And please, do not mention wedding parties and crap, and those ridiculous wedding party bands, playing everything from polkas to death metal, because that's as far away from the idea of Rock as it should be from Jazz, as in fact it is.

    It is completely different issue from being a pro musician, almost not related, at all. Pro musician does it for living, but is not Rocker, nor Jazzer .. he's labor woker providing musical labor, nothing more. Can not label preferable genre on his forhead and pretend he's some kind of cultural enterpreur, let alone elite ..

    Have to go now, kid is waiting at the school door already ...
    Creativity used to be optional in wedding bands and especially top 40 bands. You got out of it what you put into it. I found it to be welcome escape from the purist BS at the time. Rock, rap, R&B, Top 40, it's all gone. Jazz is in big trouble too in most places but it may snap out of it's stupor. It's traditional to many people even though there's a wide variety.

    There's too much genre hate around here. Looking down on other kinds of entertainment. These tribute bands make me want to hang with DJs, strippers and Kenny G. I have new-found respect for them now.

  10. #109

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    New jazz...is that like the new math?
    New math? I don't know. Some of the Neo-Soul is interesting. I like the stuff that has a folky thing going on. I think it's intended to be laid-back experimental music. Chill-out music. Definitely not get on the dance floor music.

  11. #110

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    RichB, those are not clips about excellence in playing guitar, thread is not about that. It is about use of backing tracks on a gig and those clips are about situations where playing over backing tracks is a good thing to do, as it is one of the core elements of presented music, as oposed to where backing tracks are used because they are cheap.

    Must say, I do not believe you did not understand the point. I think you actully grasp how realy and extremly good pop act USM Carter are, you just won't admit it for whatever reason.

    EDIT: Of course, if you were talking about clips I posted, first place. Sorry if I jumped forward.
    Last edited by Vladan; 10-31-2014 at 07:56 PM.
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  12. #111

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    Quote Originally Posted by Richb View Post
    1Most people here, from what I've seen, don't have even a FAINT clue of what excellence in playing actually is. Quid pro quo.
    Or maybe most of the other posters this site understand that George Benson and Pat Metheny are once-in-a-generation players and are legends for a reason, and that despite the fact that we can discern elements of other posters' playing that do not measure up to the greatest performers on the instrument who have ever lived, we don't feel the need to trash everyone else's playing to feel better about ourselves or prove some unintelligible point.

  13. #112

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    ^^^
    Doesn't matter if Wolf can play or not. It's all publish-or-perish in jazz now.

  14. #113

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    Quote Originally Posted by Richb View Post
    No. Just no.

    There is no reason ever to knock a player publicly. But when people are talking about said player as if they are "great" then I sometimes say something. It needs to be said. People hang on these guys every word, and the player in person is sub-mediocre. That's 3/4 of the reason why people never play well, they have the waters muddied by the misinformation peddled and talked about endlessly by other amateurs and (amazingly) some so-called "pros" who wouldn't know what good is if it smacked them in the face.

    Poor Wolf can't play. That would be fine - we all need as much help as we can get - but the guy publishes books and who knows what else. It shouldn't be propagated. People who can't play shouldn't be trying to teach others ANYTHING about music. And they shouldn't be talked about as examples of excellence in music. It depresses the entire artform when junk is talked about as if it is excellent.
    But people can't tell the difference. Which is why they can't play. And so the cycle propagates. Non players telling amateur non-players what to do and then the amateur non-player spouts off about this to others. It's a storm of amateur mediocrity which begets itself, and then PUBLICIZES itself.
    Don't know about that Rich - think you're getting too worked up over this.

    Now very few guys have the talent/work ethic/skills/background to become great players, and those that do can quite easily work out for themselves who can cut it and who can't. To a large degree it's innate. Occasionally I see a pro giving an endorsement of sorts to a player who's not the best, but it's probably out of politeness or personal loyalty etc. It's not the TOTAL DISASTER!!! you might think it is.

    I watched Wolf play Freddie Freeloader - to some blues lawyer guy who can play a handful of jazz chords, if he saw Wolf play in a restaurant like that he'd be stoked - because everything's relative. Compared to the blues lawyer, Wolf really is a great player. And everyone digs it and has a good time. What's the problem with that?

    Except: Don't approve of the backing track for a straight ahead jazz gig though. Youtube bedroom clips are one thing, but for gigs... no.

  15. #114

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    In truth, I would agree that the finest players can carry off a consistently entrancing performance as chord melody soloists. But one has to concede that to create a set list of virtuoso level solo performances in that vein requires not only virtuosity but a lot of work.

    For example, last night I started working on that beautiful song, I Close My Eyes, by Billy Reid. This song like many other jazz classics can be carried off with panache as a solo chord melody. I wrote out the transcription in Sibelius in the key of F. This will be the basis for an improvised solo version, but I still wrote out the lead sheet as a melody stave and a guitar block chord staff accompaniment as my basic tracks to refine. With my new ability to use my Godin LGX-SA guitar for note entry into Sibelius I will be able to craft a more refined solo guitar instrumental version both at a ballad and as an uptempo version that is more boppy.

    I'm really excited to be working on this tune, because it is a beauty. And I would have to concede that playing over as a backing track would be far easier than taking it to a high chord melody level, especially at the faster tempo. But that is what I will aspire to do. And meanwhile as I dig into the improv possibilities, I use the backing tracks to free me up and keep me grounded. Plus I get inspiration from the notation.

    So I think the solo version would be much harder to perform, though I don't know if they would pay you more.

    Jay
    Last edited by targuit; 11-01-2014 at 11:13 AM.

  16. #115

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    Backing tracks in live performance just seem contrary to the spirit of jazz. It would be better if possible to form a duo with another musician who can provide some backing, e.g. bass or keyboard or (even!) another guitarist.

  17. #116

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    It's not jazz. I don't even know if i can call it jazz when i play solo. Jazz is all about the interaction.

    And music doesn't have to be jazz to be good. But i prefer not to distort people's opinions on what it is too much and dry up any opportunity i get to play the real thing...cuz thats the real thrill for me. And if that's selfish, tough tacos.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  18. #117

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    Going back to what the OP asked, there are some nice tracks available here.

    https://lrweb.berklee.edu/resources/playalongs/


    You can download as mp3s and pdfs. On the audio track you can change it from 'all instruments' to other options e.g. no drums etc.

    I'm not sure if there are any bossas, but still it's a useful resource.

  19. #118

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    Quote Originally Posted by Richb View Post
    No. Just no.

    There is no reason ever to knock a player publicly. But when people are talking about said player as if they are "great" then I sometimes say something. It needs to be said. People hang on these guys every word, and the player in person is sub-mediocre. That's 3/4 of the reason why people never play well, they have the waters muddied by the misinformation peddled and talked about endlessly by other amateurs and (amazingly) some so-called "pros" who wouldn't know what good is if it smacked them in the face.

    Poor Wolf can't play. That would be fine - we all need as much help as we can get - but the guy publishes books and who knows what else. It shouldn't be propagated. People who can't play shouldn't be trying to teach others ANYTHING about music. And they shouldn't be talked about as examples of excellence in music. It depresses the entire artform when junk is talked about as if it is excellent.
    But people can't tell the difference. Which is why they can't play. And so the cycle propagates. Non players telling amateur non-players what to do and then the amateur non-player spouts off about this to others. It's a storm of amateur mediocrity which begets itself, and then PUBLICIZES itself.
    I think if you go back and read most of the threads where you've popped in to trash someone's playing, you'll see that no one was "hanging on every word" of the folks posted in the videos. We're having a discussion with people, and part of having a respectful discussion is not trying to zero in on everyone's weak points and out them for being a "joke" of a player like you compulsively do in every thread.

    Take Wolf Marshal. Sure, Wolf is not the greatest player on the planet. He loses the pocket sometimes. But he also contributed a great deal to the jazz guitar community by transcribing a crap ton of solos and offering them up to students. I've used his books and really got a lot out of it.

    Now, you can listen to Wolf and zero in on his time issues and totally write him off as a player, or you can listen to him and focus on the fact that he has some great jazz vocabulary that he's pulled out of the history of the music. Am I going to go to Wolf for advice on picking technique or groove? No. But I might ask him advice on transcription since he's obviously great at that.

    Your behavior in the Benson picking thread is a perfect example. Ask yourself why you feel the need to pop in there every 30 pages and point out how much the player in the last vid sucked. Who are you helping here? We have people trying to learn from George Benson, maybe the greatest living bebop guitarist. You're worried they're on the wrong track? Who are they supposed to copy? You?

    No one even knows what you sound like because you refuse to contribute to the forum anything other than vitriol.

  20. #119

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    I like Rich's opinions. Thanks to him my CD collection is down to 2 dozen or so discs, i'm hoping to cut it to less than half that once i figure out if any of the players i still have music from are any good.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  21. #120

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    Going back to what the OP asked, there are some nice tracks available here.

    https://lrweb.berklee.edu/resources/playalongs/


    You can download as mp3s and pdfs. On the audio track you can change it from 'all instruments' to other options e.g. no drums etc.

    I'm not sure if there are any bossas, but still it's a useful resource.
    Thank you grahambop for the link, is nice to see, once in a wile, somebody remembering my original post.

    Sandro

  22. #121

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sandro View Post
    Thank you grahambop for the link, is nice to see, once in a wile, somebody remembering my original post.

    Sandro
    Have you checked out the BIAB forum?

  23. #122

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    richb
    There is no reason ever to knock a player publicly. But when people are talking about said player as if they are "great" then I sometimes say something. It needs to be said.
    This forum is public ...............
    How can you contradict yourself in two consecutive sentences ..... ?

    Also you're very negative man

    you don't have to be a incredible/superb/fabulous etc to play Jazz
    you just pucker up and blow

  24. #123

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stevebol View Post
    Have you checked out the BIAB forum?
    Hi Stevebol, yes I did lot's of material there too.

    Thanks,
    Sandro

  25. #124

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    I like Rich's opinions. Thanks to him my CD collection is down to 2 dozen or so discs, i'm hoping to cut it to less than half that once i figure out if any of the players i still have music from are any good.
    Yeah, I'm down to just Wes Montgomery now, and he's going soon because RB once said his time is a little sloppy sometimes.

  26. #125

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    To test out your gypsy jazz chops, try these:

    Lessons |

  27. #126

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    No one is in a position to judge anybody unless somebody ask to be judge. There are many ways to say "I love you", there are people who are poet and they can say it in a very sophisticated and beautiful way and others can just say "I Love You" but that doesn't diminished the love they have for that person or make them less than a lover. Music is like that, is much more than a technique is much bigger than jazz, rock or blues Miles Davis is a spake of sand compare to it, music is freedom of speech, I can say what I want the way I want, if you don't like it move on but don't you judge me because you are not entitle and I didn't ask for it.

    Sandro

  28. #127

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    To test out your gypsy jazz chops, try these:

    Lessons |
    Cool I like this....

    Thanks,
    Sandro

  29. #128

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    Quote Originally Posted by 3625 View Post
    Except: Don't approve of the backing track for a straight ahead jazz gig though. Youtube bedroom clips are one thing, but for gigs... no.
    Hi 3625 and grahambop, please read post #10

    Sandro

  30. #129

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sandro View Post
    Hi 3625 and grahambop, please read post #10

    Sandro
    Hey Sandro, I read post #10 - even as background music, backing tracks are a no go for me. I understand why - especially for a solo background gig. They're convenient and cheap. But they kill the magic - kill it. And that's a tragedy They take something beautiful and turn it into plastic - you can't get any nutrition from plastic - they provide no food for the soul. Live music is a sacrament!

    I'm talking about swing jazz/latin jazz etc. 'classic jazz' if you will. Not some kind of fusion/modern instrumental stuff.

  31. #130

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    Backing Tracks for live gigs-8dd7aa46d497c98a2bd21cfa44724aa6a34f19876a54028e94097424baa41f2c-jpg

  32. #131

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    I don't know. I've used some backing tracks to make some recordings, for fun and for students and just because. I haven't done it on a gig, but I haven't HEARD anyone complain about those. I found inspiration.

  33. #132

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sandro View Post
    Hi 3625 and grahambop, please read post #10

    Sandro
    If it's background music, no-one's going to be listening out for a whole band, couldn't you record your own backing tracks on guitar? At least for the bossa tunes, that's quite easy with an acoustic guitar.

    At least you would be playing all the music yourself. And you could make the tracks just how you want them, i.e. right key, tempo and length, some fancy intros and endings, etc.

  34. #133

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    I like a nice set of backing tracks that include some sax solos and sometimes vocals every few songs. It's nice to take a break and just lay out for a tune or just comp a bit, really gives the audience a nice variety. Sometimes just pretending to play along with some Wes album cuts with my guitar volume turned off does the trick, and sounds awesome. The majority of listeners love it and have no clue. The proof is repeat gigs. Pay is better than real jazz gig.

  35. #134

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    If it's background music, no-one's going to be listening out for a whole band, couldn't you record your own backing tracks on guitar? At least for the bossa tunes, that's quite easy with an acoustic guitar.

    At least you would be playing all the music yourself. And you could make the tracks just how you want them, i.e. right key, tempo and length, some fancy intros and endings, etc.
    Hi grahambop yes I will record a few of the backing tracks my self, is going to be a mix.

    Sandro

  36. #135

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    Quote Originally Posted by 3625 View Post
    Hey Sandro, I read post #10 - even as background music, backing tracks are a no go for me. I understand why - especially for a solo background gig. They're convenient and cheap. But they kill the magic - kill it. And that's a tragedy They take something beautiful and turn it into plastic - you can't get any nutrition from plastic - they provide no food for the soul. Live music is a sacrament!

    I'm talking about swing jazz/latin jazz etc. 'classic jazz' if you will. Not some kind of fusion/modern instrumental stuff.
    Is not the backing tracks that provide the "food for the soul" but the artist playing over the backing tracks that does, the artist on the stage is the live music and nothing else. It looks like you forgot about him...

    Sandro

  37. #136

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo View Post
    I like a nice set of backing tracks that include some sax solos and sometimes vocals every few songs. It's nice to take a break and just lay out for a tune or just comp a bit, really gives the audience a nice variety. Sometimes just pretending to play along with some Wes album cuts with my guitar volume turned off does the trick, and sounds awesome. The majority of listeners love it and have no clue. The proof is repeat gigs. Pay is better than real jazz gig.
    No joke, recently I've heard about a childhood friend having agig where he plays rockaabilly records in some restaurant, full commercial records by all the greats, while plonking guitar here and there and making some dance moves, of course being properly dressed and everything. And guess what, audience loves him. That's what I've heard. Kind of radio DJ with a guitar, in a restaurant.
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  38. #137

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    Quote Originally Posted by Richb View Post
    Ok guys, I've been suitably chastised. I'll delete my comment.
    Why delete man? own that shit.

    Real talk...9 times out of 10 you're dead on right...you just deliver your opinions with such vitriol nobody in their right mind would ever want to agree with you.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  39. #138

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    Why delete man? own that shit.

    Real talk...9 times out of 10 you're dead on right...you just deliver your opinions with such vitriol nobody in their right mind would ever want to agree with you.
    Hahah

  40. #139

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo View Post
    I like a nice set of backing tracks that include some sax solos and sometimes vocals every few songs. It's nice to take a break and just lay out for a tune or just comp a bit, really gives the audience a nice variety. Sometimes just pretending to play along with some Wes album cuts with my guitar volume turned off does the trick, and sounds awesome. The majority of listeners love it and have no clue. The proof is repeat gigs. Pay is better than real jazz gig.
    Well I hope you're joking (!) but this reminds me of something. A couple of years ago our local DIY homebase store started playing canned jazz. Listening closely I was absolutely certain it was taken from BIAB with the sax soloist switched on!

    They don't play music now. So even the poor old BIAB robot soloist couldn't keep the corporate gig!

  41. #140

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    Thereare two main points to this thread:

    One: there are two distinct viewpoints. The first view says that I don't care what happens to other musicians or what has happened to other musicians I only care about enhancing my own personal situation in terms of the bottom line and I don't care about the artistic consequences of using canned backing tracks by a live musician. The second is says: the person that does not care about what happens to other musicians will find him or herself in the same situation, eventually: unemployed and replaced by an iPod or Spotify. That is to say, if the musicians don't care about standing up for musicians or the artistic consequences of using canned backing tracks, why should the club owner care? Eventually they will see the light, and there'll be no gigs for anybody anymore.

    That is one thing people who hold the first view have yet to answer: what are the consequences of their choices in the intermediate term and will it even come back to bite them?

    Two--there are some great sound libraries that can create really cool music in a DAW setting in terms of recording. From Garritan to Viana too many other choices, sampling, VSTs, audio units, and MIDI have come a long way. Did you know that the pioneering digital synthesizers used by people like Herbie Hancock and Peter Gabriel in the early 80s that cost tens of thousands of dollars--the Fairlight CMI--can now all be put in one iPad app?

    But band in a box or I Real Pro? Great practice tools, but the Epitome of laziness and indifference if used in a live format as canned backing tracks?
    Last edited by NSJ; 11-02-2014 at 01:20 PM.
    Navdeep Singh.

  42. #141

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    Worst case of technology trumping me as a player.....

    I hang with a matial arts group 2-3 times a week. At an after-workout gathering as often occurs, someone brought an older friend along. One of the members started pumping me up about my guitar playing, and was asking me various questions on how to learn certain techniques. My bubble was quickly burst, when the group guest interrupted to tell us all that we needed to hear her grandson play. She relayed that he was only 7 years old, had only been playing a few months, and he was already playing at a professional level with a full band. At first I didn't say anything, except well "Great!" But then I started wondering, 'cause it just sounded a bit over-the-top. Well she never copped to it being 'Guitar Hero,' and she insisted he was playing a real guitar; but upon answering a series of questions, that's what it had to have been.

    Also......There's a South Park episode where the kids are playing 'Guitar Hero.' Stan's dad (one of the kids' dads) sees this, gets all excited and insists that the kids listen to him play a real guitar, where he plays an old classic rock song note-for-note (believe it was Kansas). The kids basically tell him to get lost, so that they can continue playing Guitar Hero. Funny, tragic scene.

    On the flip side.......I was doing a Social Work internship about 5 years back. It was for an adolescent program. I would often bring my guitar along and teach the kids some beginning songs. The ones that played 'Guitar Hero' tended to be able to switch notes and chords in time pretty easily.........oftentimes more easily than other kids trying to learn who had better ears.

  43. #142

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    Quote Originally Posted by NSJ View Post
    Thereare two main points to this thread:

    One: there are two distinct viewpoints. The first view says that I don't care what happens to other musicians or what has happened to other musicians
    I can't find anyone in this thread who said that.
    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  44. #143

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    Quote Originally Posted by targuit View Post
    I have just one response to those who feel that playing to backing tracks cannot be original, other than being an "original sin". And this is one of the finest guitarists I have ever heard. Happens to be a contributor to the forum, too.

    If you would be bored by this fellow because he doesn't have a real band behind him, then you have tin ears. Of course, Paul is so good, he should have a top class jazz quintet backing him. Just my opinion...



    Jay
    You are right, Jay! Paul is top notch and a very good friend, we both graduated from G.I.T. in 1978.
    Howie

  45. #144

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    Creating your own backing tracks makes them part of the creative process. Buying commercial backing tracks doesn't teach one as much as making them from scratch, no matter what kind of music, including straight-ahead jazz. Another way to do a solo gig effectively is with a looper. Play your solo arrangement of the head, then do a chorus of backup with the looper, then play over that, or do a vamp and play over that. One can even prepare and save loops before doing the gig, which may give you the opportunity to lay down a bassline, then comp over it, and even create a "drum" part by tapping or strumming the muted strings. With a 7-string, this becomes even more complete. I do many jazz brunches, and this is a great way to actually get to play some jazz, interacting with your own harmonic and rhythmic concepts.

  46. #145
    Quote Originally Posted by ronjazz View Post
    Play your solo arrangement of the head, then do a chorus of backup with the looper, then play over that, or do a vamp and play over that. One can even prepare and save loops before doing the gig, which may give you the opportunity to lay down a bassline, then comp over it, and even create a "drum" part by tapping or strumming the muted strings. With a 7-string, this becomes even more complete. I do many jazz brunches, and this is a great way to actually get to play some jazz, interacting with your own harmonic and rhythmic concepts.
    I'd love to see/hear you doing this if you've got a recording or whatever...or just a phone at a gig maybe. sounds cool...

  47. #146

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    We have a really good guitarist in town, Hank Easton, that plays in bands and does solo acts also.

    I go to see him play solo sometimes at a outside dinner place that has maybe 10 - 12 tables, it's part of a hotel. I don't know what he get's paid but it can't be much, maybe mostly tips. He also has to keep his volume down because of the location. They have solo acts every night, he has Wednesdays. This is clearly a solo act location and gig.

    He splits his act up between some tunes with backing tracks and some not. He has a huge repertoire across genres.

    I would argue his use of backing tracks is not putting anyone out of work, is not hurting any musicians. He could easily do the gig without the backing tracks, he chooses not to. The small audience seems to dig it and he's a draw. He makes a living.

    He's so, so, so much better than me... these are the kind of musicians that keep me from having any desire to play in public.





    Hank playing with one of the bands he plays with:

    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  48. #147

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    Just to clarify ... there is a difference between a practice being damaging to the industry and musician pay --- and a person (singular) stealing gigs from other people. I have nothing to say about the latter. That happens all the time and should. The former is far more serious and harder to pinpoint. Take a group playing at a few small restaurants for free. It's likely they aren't stealing gigs from other musicians because if the restaurants don't pay then they probably (though I suppose they could've been) weren't planning to hire musicians up to that point. BUT .... that group has created an expectation that musicians can be paid in "publicity" (my ass) and otherwise will play for free. If enough other groups start doing the same thing then there can be serious damage done.

    Not to drag this through the thread again but I keep hearing cracks about "not stealing anyone's gig" and "sorry backing tracks are stealing your gig" etc and I want to clarify that that is not at all what I was talking about.

  49. #148
    Meh...I'd rather listen to someone who doesn't need backing tracks to perform...in any situation. However I don't care if others use them. Whatever makes you happy however....

    This guy is a human jukebox.


  50. #149

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    Quote Originally Posted by OldGuitarPlayer View Post
    Meh...I'd rather listen to someone who doesn't need backing tracks to perform...in any situation. However I don't care if others use them. Whatever makes you happy however....

    This guy is a human jukebox.



    +1...:-)

  51. #150

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    Quote Originally Posted by OldGuitarPlayer View Post

    This guy is a human jukebox.

    That's so neat! Or as the old song goes, "That's Entertainment!"
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola