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  1. #151

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    I went round Europe three times on the flute in the late 80s - playing Bach and Mozart mostly

    made about 100 quid a night on the French Riviera

    ----

    I introduced my boys to flute during lockdown - we worked out a bunch of tunes, some with three part harmonies (St Thomas, If I only had a brain, Mona Lisa, Zipadeedoodaa)

    after about 6 weeks I was on the high street in Worcester with my younger boy (7) playing these tunes. He had it all down pretty well.

    what I could not believe is that so few people took any notice. He's 7 - we're playing sweet flute duets on cool tunes - and 85 percent of people behaved as if we weren't there.

    he was thrilled we made twenty quid in about half an hour.

    I've probably messed him up something rotten.

    (I was very happy to do this instead of getting a proper job through Uni. - but I'm not prepared to do it - without a seven year old - any more)

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #152

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    Sometimes you just gotta stop the deliberating and get out there and play. I'm glad some do and I reckon Tuba Skinny here would fit the mood in many US streets right now






  4. #153

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    I have Busked some didnt really do it for the cash, I would some times play Mr. Bo Jangles to see the peoples reaction. I would mostly do my own songs. I have seen some Buskers do a well known sing along and draw large crowds And I have seen wandering players that could make more money because they went to where a crowd was. There are some street rules you should follow and there are police rules you should follow. And if you go with a group to Busk then you will be noticed fast and have the rules apply harder.

  5. #154

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    dig this busking for sure

    Veronica Swift is totally blowing my mind


  6. #155

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    I've busked quite a bit in my life. The days of jazz musicians having tons of gigs and getting a lot of experience that way mostly seems gone (especially with the pandemic), so, busking certainly seems like a good alternative for getting experience playing with other people. I know a lot of standards and the way I learned most of them was just playing gigs and busking.

    These days, in NYC, you can catch Chris Potter, or Pete Bernstein or many other famous jazz musicians playing in the street.

  7. #156

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    I busked a little in high school and college (usually accompanying a singer), and it felt really weird. Not sure why, but it just did, so I avoided it.

    Recently, my duo partner and I have played on the sidewalk outside a restaurant (restaurant seating is all outdoors right now) for tips plus a meal and drinks a few times. Being on the street, it has some of the vibe of busking with people stopping to listen and throw tips in the jar even if they're not at the restaurant (and the occasional street character disrupting things a little). It has been pretty enjoyable.

    As long as weather permits, I'll keep doing this. In these days of limited opportunities to play, it has nice to have this outlet.

    John

  8. #157

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    Now I was forced to see what washtube bass means, not knowing the term. I realized that one of my most memorable street music (listening) experience is exactly that, way long ago in New Orleans. The guy was incredibly musical, btw the whole city was also. You just simply take a deep breath somewhere in the street, and inhale Music

  9. #158

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    Wow. Talented musicians playing "the street" to throngs of brain-dead automatons who value a Cappucchino or Biscotti more than one of the highest forms of human communication--Music(most customers/passers-by never turned to even look at them). And there are some here who say Jazz is alive? Benny's band back in the 60's/70's would have had the pick of the best clubs in Chicago to play 5 nights a week while others bidded for their services. Wonder what they made for that gig?
    Play live . . . for a fair fee . . . or stay at home . . . Marinero

    P.S. Your Golden Cocker Spaniel at home is certainly a more appreciative audience than the uninterested mushroom heads in the video. Sad. Very sad. M

  10. #159

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    I enjoy playing on the streets here in Brazil - São Paulo, because some people that have no idea about swing or trad jazz can hear it and sometimes really enjoy it.
    A lot of people around here have the idea that Jazz is "elevator music" and that you can't dance with it, so when we play and some of our lindy hoppers friends come together it's always a great experience to show it to this audience that would never go to a jazz club because of what they think what Jazz is...


  11. #160

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    Hi, G,
    Thanks for the video of Veronica. She's the real deal. Here's another video. Enjoy.
    Play live . . . Marinero



  12. #161

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    Check out Veronica at 5:52



    Play live . . . Marinero

  13. #162

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    [QUOTE=Marinero;1074185]Check out Veronica at 5:52



    Play live . . . Marinero[/QUOTE

    I'm glad someone noticed Marinero! I posted this in a different thread and it seemed to get missed.

    I really don't know how.

    I've never heard singing like it - glorious! - so uplifting. She out blows both these guys (whoever they are!) - and you can see it on their faces!

    everything I've heard from her is magic. try 'social call' - or 'you're gonna hear from me' .....

  14. #163

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    "She out blows both these guys (whoever they are!) - and you can see it on their faces!"

    Um, the trumpet player is only Wynton Marsalis. She's good but she certainly didn't 'out blow' him.

  15. #164

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    If you busk in my neck of the woods, you better bring some chops.




    Seriously, we have some of the best street musicians in the world in Asheville. The wife and I had patio seating at a wine bar in the River Arts District and were entertained by a marvelous classical violinist. A character and the man could play.

  16. #165

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    I'm back busking after the winter and loving it. Had to practice a bit to get the repertoire back under the fingers but the tunes cane back pretty quickly.

    I've been out three times and have already donated some money to charity.

    It's just nice to play music outside in the sunshine, meeting nice people and busking for a good cause.

  17. #166

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    What is your opinion on busking?

    Terrific fun, and you get paid for it!

  18. #167
    I would say if you like it GREAT!!! if you dont well then dont do it. The buskers in NYC can often outplay the nightclub musicians in other cities. When I lived in Soho NYC in the late eighties I met a really good German jazz guitarist who said he usually made about 100$ perday ,so four days a week would cover his rent with roomates back then. I dont his or their names but there is a really terrific baritone sax player who plays in the subways and with other horn players that I discovered on YT. I think he works in Paris,too. In Vancover I heard a really good classical player who was also selling his CDs for 10$ a copy. We bought one. Fresh air,networking with other people and sharing the Gift of Music to help cover expenses sounds like a Winner to me!!!

  19. #168
    Under the name The Coolest Subway Band Ever is the horn group I was talking about doing Funky Town. The Tik Tok version is also pretty good if you like beautiful women!!! Both are on You Tube.

  20. #169

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    Cool posts.

    I rarely have done any busking. I prefer gigs where you know how much money you make when you contract them.

  21. #170

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    Busking is very similar to the itinerant traveling musicians during the the Middle Ages traveling from town to town and playing for the generosity of the audience. I think it takes a certain personality to perform in this fashion. Good luck to all buskers!! Play live . . . Marinero

  22. #171

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    I hate it! It demeans real musicians in my opinion, and perpetuates low wages.
    Just imagine doing any other job like that. It's like saying Work For Food!

    Amateurs and starving musicians always go this route,especially in bigger cities!
    Degrading to the profession !

  23. #172

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    Quote Originally Posted by jads57
    I hate it! It demeans real musicians in my opinion, and perpetuates low wages.
    Just imagine doing any other job like that. It's like saying Work For Food!

    Amateurs and starving musicians always go this route,especially in bigger cities!
    Degrading to the profession !
    This is degrading to people who just want to go out and play in their community. Real musicianship is not gate kept by whether a restaurant owner feels like paying you.

    Also, music is more than a profession and is not limited to those who chose to make it theirs.

    I say this as someone who has never busked and would meet your "real musician" criteria. If your livelihood is threatened by a hobbyist playing tunes on a street corner you might reconsider your security.

  24. #173

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    "I say this as someone who has never busked and would meet your "real musician" criteria. If your livelihood is threatened by a hobbyist playing tunes on a street corner you might reconsider your security." drbhrb

    Hi, D,
    This is simply not true since it may not effect you getting a job . . . but it does effect the potential for how much you will be paid. When music is associated with being "free" for people's enjoyment as evidenced by musicians playing throughout the city, why would a club owner/restaurant/bar pay more than a pittance, if any, for entertainment? We're not talking about the Rolling Stones or Taylor Swift but rather local musicians who are trying to make a living in the trade. A case in point: in the recent past, I lived in a suburban/rural area. There were several bars that had live music. Most didn't pay their performers. The bands rationalized they did it for "experience". So, bands that wouldn't play for free were forced to travel into the city where they would at least be paid something although when they figured in travel time, set-up/take-down/gas, it was a loser--they were playing very close to free. This is also the case with Classical musicians. Many players will play for free at events to establish their names with the idea that it will promote their career when in reality they are hurting other musicians who will not play for free. Can you imagine a union plumber recently graduated from trade school fixing your plugged toilet for free to get "experience?"
    Play live . . . Marinero




  25. #174

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    "I say this as someone who has never busked and would meet your "real musician" criteria. If your livelihood is threatened by a hobbyist playing tunes on a street corner you might reconsider your security." drbhrb

    Hi, D,
    This is simply not true since it may not effect you getting a job . . . but it does effect the potential for how much you will be paid. When music is associated with being "free" for people's enjoyment as evidenced by musicians playing throughout the city, why would a club owner/restaurant/bar pay more than a pittance, if any, for entertainment? We're not talking about the Rolling Stones or Taylor Swift but rather local musicians who are trying to make a living in the trade. A case in point: in the recent past, I lived in a suburban/rural area. There were several bars that had live music. Most didn't pay their performers. The bands rationalized they did it for "experience". So, bands that wouldn't play for free were forced to travel into the city where they would at least be paid something although when they figured in travel time, set-up/take-down/gas, it was a loser--they were playing very close to free. This is also the case with Classical musicians. Many players will play for free at events to establish their names with the idea that it will promote their career when in reality they are hurting other musicians who will not play for free. Can you imagine a union plumber recently graduated from trade school fixing your plugged toilet for free to get "experience?"
    Play live . . . Marinero



    To your example - I fixed my own toilet yesterday for free. Despite that plumbers are still making great money because they offer a skillset and professionalism that a DIYer doesn't possess. If someone can't differentiate themselves over someone playing tunes on the street then I don't think they have a marketable skill. Too often the experience is the same and it shouldn't be - gaps between songs, no talking to the audience or even considering the audience, middling skill. Bands/musicians that engage an audience and make the venue money don't have an issue finding work that pays.

    None of that is directed at you or assuming this covers all situations (I believe your anecdote). I just see a lot of working musicians that offer a bland product and act like they are entitled to gigs because they decided that was how they were going to make their living.

  26. #175

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    " Bands/musicians that engage an audience and make the venue money don't have an issue finding work that pays." D


    Hi, D,
    I agree that audience engagement is a plus but how then should we judge Segovia, Brendel, or Rubenstein by that standard? So, it's really the pay that's the issue. Back in the late 60's we got $40-50. per man up to 4 musicians for 3 sets/non-union) . Today, my son-in-law's last Rock gig in 2020 paid $40. per man. They engage the audience and were paid. How about 50 plus years of inflation? However, our erstwhile plumber makes $130.00 per hour and he doesn't have to engage anyone other than your throne.
    Play live . . . Marinero