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  1. #1

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    Next week I'll be playing for 1,000+ people at my school.
    Got any tips on how you managed to survive stage fright?

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  3. #2

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    You just have to get out and do it. You'll have it, as everyone does, but once you're in performance mode it will fade. I can't offer much more than that.
    Last edited by paynow; 03-15-2011 at 02:32 PM.
    Barney Kessel was asked, “What’s the hardest thing about studio work?” He replied, “Finding a parking place.”
    "I don't know what other people are doing - I just know about me."- Thelonious Monk

  4. #3

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    I survived stage fright by learning how to breathe on stage. Nowadays I get away with a couple of flesh wounds. It gets better everytime you play though, so, keep your chin up!

  5. #4

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    To be honest, big shows are a lot easier for stage fright than smaller shows. At a smaller venue everybody can hear and pay attention to what you are doing and you can see the reactions on everybody's faces. Playing to a venue with a few thousand people they all just kind of blur together, and you don't notice as much.

    Where it gets really easy is the really big concerts and festivals where there are 10k plus in attendance. Then you know that it's mostly guys trying to set it up so that they can get tender with their girlfriend after the show, and whether you play good or not isn't really going to affect their evening.

    HAHA

  6. #5

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    Nothing to be be afraid of. As was stated earlier. keep your breathing slow and even. Most importantly remember that audiences, by and large, want you to do well. They're there to enjoy the music. So, relax, breathe slowly and give them something to enjoy.

    Regards,
    monk

  7. #6

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    Repeat these four sentences over and over (-to yourself.)
    1) "I'm glad I'm here."
    2) "I'm glad you're here."
    3) "I care about you."
    4) "I know that I know."
    This isn't magic or mysticism. It will help regulate your breathing. (Everyone *says* to breathe but saying that doesn't help a nervous person *do* it.) It will also keep anxious thoughts from corroding your confidence. It works.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  8. #7

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    I do the meditations in Kenny Werner's "Effortless Mastery." I like those alot.

  9. #8

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    I find that if you know what your playing.... feel alright with material, and don't have false expectations of how it will go... When you jump off a cliff...(into water), you don't jump because it's safe. We usually jump to get that feeling, to scare ourselfs. Enjoy that feeling off not being in control... You will learn how to focus on your playing, while being aware of the audience. But for now focus on your playing and whom your playing with.... Best of luck and enjoy...Reg

  10. #9

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    When I go out, I usually say to myself

    "1. You know what you're doing because you've done it many times before.
    2. Don't try anything you're not sure of where you have a high chance of blowing.
    3. Go out and have a lot of fun".

    Once you've said all that, you'll be just fine.

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vintage View Post
    Next week I'll be playing for 1,000+ people at my school.
    Got any tips on how you managed to survive stage fright?
    Good evening, Vintage...
    Hollywood Bowl seats 17 000+, so you're starting small..!
    No, seriously, A+ for markerhodes advice above.
    We've all done this, and, without exception, survived with smiles on our faces, lots of anecdotes, and a keen desire to do it again, as soon as possible.
    (Please check the earthing of the hall sockets before plugging in; we don't wanted you electrocuted..! )
    Please let us know how it went (if you have pics, we'd love to see you on stage...).
    You'll do fine, kid. Enjoy yourselves, and give 'em your simple best. No sweat.
    (In British theatrical tradition, I'd say 'Break a leg..!' ...)
    Have a nice day

    Dad3353 (Douglas...)

  12. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Dad3353 View Post
    Good evening, Vintage...
    Hollywood Bowl seats 17 000+, so you're starting small..!
    No, seriously, A+ for markerhodes advice above.
    We've all done this, and, without exception, survived with smiles on our faces, lots of anecdotes, and a keen desire to do it again, as soon as possible.
    (Please check the earthing of the hall sockets before plugging in; we don't wanted you electrocuted..! )
    Please let us know how it went (if you have pics, we'd love to see you on stage...).
    You'll do fine, kid. Enjoy yourselves, and give 'em your simple best. No sweat.
    (In British theatrical tradition, I'd say 'Break a leg..!' ...)
    Yeah, it's small but it's "big" to me. You gotta start somewhere, eh?

    The school's electricity seems fine, except for (ironically) the band room,
    mics shock us there.

    Will have some pics, sound clips, and possibly video!

    We had rehearsal today and it didn't go as well as it should've.
    It was very disappointing. Everyone has the music down pat
    without looking at music, even without the singer, but it
    the sound was off. I blame the new PA and whoever messed with all
    our amp settings.

    Thanks for the great advice everyone!
    Last edited by Vintage; 03-15-2011 at 07:42 PM.

  13. #12

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    As said, breathe deeply, but most importantly...

    Slow down.

    In my experience the little adrenaline rush makes everything speed up: breathing, talking, tempos, the whole set list. Time will fly by at accelerated velocities!

    So consciously slow down, every breath, every note, every intro, every thankyou... you get the idea.
    Find your voice, and tell a story!

    Circle 'Round the Sun

  14. #13

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    Stay away from caffeine before playing a big show.

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnoL View Post
    Stay away from caffeine before playing a big show.
    Yes, and eat light, if at all.
    Barney Kessel was asked, “What’s the hardest thing about studio work?” He replied, “Finding a parking place.”
    "I don't know what other people are doing - I just know about me."- Thelonious Monk

  16. #15

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    ...and no loose women, either...
    (well, okay, not too many, then... )
    Have a nice day

    Dad3353 (Douglas...)

  17. #16

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    1000 people is a lot, almost too many to deal with.

    Instad, narrow your focus. Concentrate on the few people closest to you. Perform just for them, as though they were your closest friends and you were having an evening at home. Make every note, every movement mean something for those people. Win them over and get them on your side.



    Then, once the band's with you, the audience is no problem.....

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffstritt View Post
    To be honest, big shows are a lot easier for stage fright than smaller shows. At a smaller venue everybody can hear and pay attention to what you are doing and you can see the reactions on everybody's faces. Playing to a venue with a few thousand people they all just kind of blur together, and you don't notice as much.

    Where it gets really easy is the really big concerts and festivals where there are 10k plus in attendance. Then you know that it's mostly guys trying to set it up so that they can get tender with their girlfriend after the show, and whether you play good or not isn't really going to affect their evening.

    HAHA
    Like you've ever played a 10k event... ha.

    After reading countless posts of yours (within 10 minutes of finding this site) - I've registered just to tell you what a freaking loser douchebag you are. Yes blowhard, that is all.

  19. #18
    So followed the advice here about breathing, dealing with the crowd,
    and steps before the show.. All were great tips. I performed well!
    The parent show before the actual event didn't go as good as the
    event itself with the judges and massive crowd. Guess the pressure
    from the bigger crowd helped.
    Probably one of the best experiences as a music performer I've gotten so far.
    Thanks to everyone...except canes and jeff...

    The only thing that messed with me during the entirety of the show
    echo from the mic-d drums. It sounded weird, almost like drums with
    delay.

    Can't get the videos on here since they were recorded with a cellphone.
    They're in a 3GP format and the majority of the songs were on one clip.
    Have to do some converting and video editing.