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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jehu View Post
    A crack at the head and one chorus of aimless flailing. Feedback welcome, and as always, I'm deeply sorry.

    Good grief what is it with people apologising for their really nice playing haha?

    'Never apologise for your playing' Duncan Lamont

    That's my feedback!

  2. #62
    Quote Originally Posted by pushkar000 View Post
    Hi, here's my attempt. Painful tune to go through and somehow I kept losing it after one chorus so here's the head and one chorus. Still lots to work on and I appreciate all feedback. I would've liked to play it a little slower but I wasn't really able to make the head sound nice at a slower tempo.

    I think that's too fast for you. It doesn't have to be slow, just a bit slower than that. Why not give it another spin?

  3. #63
    This is slow... and eccentric :-)

    You remember in Blue Bossa where there's a Bb over the G7, also general major/minor vagueness in blues tunes... I decided it doesn't matter on this tune either. Haven't exploited it much though.


  4. #64
    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1 View Post
    I think that's too fast for you. It doesn't have to be slow, just a bit slower than that. Why not give it another spin?
    You are unrelenting lately with comments on others playing. The truth is that you simply don't have good enough time to comment so much on other player's time, especially in direct CONTRADICTION to players who are far superior to either of us. You are apparently inferring the wrong message from others' graciousness and restraint regarding your own playing posts.

  5. #65
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    Edited - cut to the three-finger chase:
    Quote Originally Posted by destinytot View Post
    Improvised:
    Last edited by destinytot; 11-12-2017 at 08:50 AM.
    "Each heart vibrates to that iron string."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    (who obviously played in Carl Kress tuning)

  6. #66
    Thanks christian and mr. b for your comments! Christian, I find myself appreciating your prescence here a lot recently, what with the tea for two recording and now these time exercises! (christian put up a killer take of tea for two, you can find it in the songs section)

    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    You are unrelenting lately with comments on others playing. The truth is that you simply don't have good enough time to comment so much on other player's time, especially in direct CONTRADICTION to players who are far superior to either of us. You are apparently inferring the wrong message from others' graciousness and restraint regarding your own playing posts.
    I appreciate ragman's comment and I try to give value to all feedback I receive. I enjoyed his recordings! I'm really glad that some of the super skilled folks had good things to say about my recording, but I'm quite sure they know - as do I - that there are things to improve there! But in their case, I'm inclined to think the best way to learn from them is to just listen to their recordings, try to stuff as much as you can in your pockets and run away!

    @ragman - when the tempo drops a little, I do find myself instantly feeling a lot more comfortable, and at first, yes, I was considering putting up a slower take. But I think that's not the approach I should be taking. I've resolved to continue hacking away at this tempo until I nail it. And conversely, I need to work on playing the head nicely at a slower tempo - which, try as I might, I wasn't able to do for some reason.

    Here's my version of the famous Parker parable - I went to a jam a year ago, asked for There Will Never Be Another You and they said ok. Now I was comfortable playing it at a medium tempo. But these guys just went in like Clifford Brown was on the bandstand! And there I was, a sitting duck caught in the crossfire. To this day, it was one of the most embarrassing things that I have experienced. Nobody threw a cymbal at me(I could swear the drummer was considering it!), but everybody on the stand and sitting at the bar knew I had messed it up bigtime. So one of the things I resolved to do was work on my technique and facility at all tempos.
    Need to practice!

  7. #67
    Quote Originally Posted by pushkar000 View Post
    @ragman - when the tempo drops a little, I do find myself instantly feeling a lot more comfortable, and at first, yes, I was considering putting up a slower take. But I think that's not the approach I should be taking. I've resolved to continue hacking away at this tempo until I nail it. And conversely, I need to work on playing the head nicely at a slower tempo - which, try as I might, I wasn't able to do for some reason.
    Thanks. Playing very fast and playing very slow are both tricky and I admire your determination. Actually quite a few artists have recorded How High at a medium pace and it was a song originally, of course. But I'm sure you know all that. But all the best anyway, I'm certainly no boy racer myself :-)

  8. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1 View Post
    Thanks. Playing very fast and playing very slow are both tricky and I admire your determination. Actually quite a few artists have recorded How High at a medium pace and it was a song originally, of course. But I'm sure you know all that. But all the best anyway, I'm certainly no boy racer myself :-)
    I particularly like the medium/slow version on Chet Baker's "Chet" album.

    This is one of those tunes that works at a variety of tempos though...the lyrics allow for it too...it can be wistful or bubbling with the energy of love returned (if you assume that's what happens in the end). Not a lot of tunes allow for that.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Of what use is a dream, if not a blueprint for courageous action?"

    --Adam West, as Batman, 1966.

  9. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    I particularly like the medium/slow version on Chet Baker's "Chet" album.

    This is one of those tunes that works at a variety of tempos though...the lyrics allow for it too...it can be wistful or bubbling with the energy of love returned (if you assume that's what happens in the end). Not a lot of tunes allow for that.
    What did you think of the Sonny Rollins/Barney Kessell one (once it gets off the ground!)?

  10. #70
    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1 View Post
    What did you think of the Sonny Rollins/Barney Kessell one (once it gets off the ground!)?
    Excellent, I'm admittedly a biased fan--I'll listen to anything Rollins plays...such a giant. A colossus, even.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Of what use is a dream, if not a blueprint for courageous action?"

    --Adam West, as Batman, 1966.

  11. #71
    Gramps-- people usually just post to youtube and link/embed to it here.

    Folks are generally nervous viewing/downloading from external links...too many viruses out there.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Of what use is a dream, if not a blueprint for courageous action?"

    --Adam West, as Batman, 1966.

  12. #72
    I don't think you can embed from Google Drive...YouTube's the main way of doing that.

    I don't think you'll have many folks click on that link to your drive--people can upload harmful stuff (I actually literally CAN'T as I'm at work). I'm pretty confident in saying you're "legit," but that's just the way things go...too many malicious people in the cyber world.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Of what use is a dream, if not a blueprint for courageous action?"

    --Adam West, as Batman, 1966.

  13. #73
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    Thanks for the help Mr. B. I think I have it now.

  14. #74
    There it is! Sounding good. I like how you do the melidy, and how you go after some motifs/development in the solo.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Of what use is a dream, if not a blueprint for courageous action?"

    --Adam West, as Batman, 1966.

  15. #75
    This one's a bit zippier. I apologise for the title (not something I do). I was going to change it but then remembered it was imprinted on the vid! So be it.


  16. #76
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    There is a fast and optimistic version:

  17. #77
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    Maybe someone will supply some constructive criticism of my post. There are so many players here that I respect.

    Thanks again Mr. B.
    Last edited by Gramps; 11-15-2017 at 04:41 PM.

  18. #78
    Quote Originally Posted by Gramps View Post
    Maybe someone will supply some constructive criticism of my post. There are so many players here that I respect.

    Thanks again Mr. B.
    My 2 cents - I agree with Mr. B. Your melody is very tasteful. I think maybe I would have liked to hear another chorus of your solo. There was good motivic development but usually my personal feeling is that a solo with only melody is - albeit quite tasteful - incomplete.

    For me the dream is something like your first chorus + some fast bop lines + some octave or chord playing(you had some octaves) + a little bit of blues here and there.

    Edit : In your melody, I really like two points where you go down by half steps. And subconsciously, I found myself playing the same just now as I was practicing. So I owe you one!
    Last edited by pushkar000; 11-16-2017 at 05:10 AM.
    Need to practice!

  19. #79
    Quote Originally Posted by Gramps View Post
    Maybe someone will supply some constructive criticism of my post.
    Okay. It's got a good rhythm to it, nice bounce. I think if there's one thing about it it's that it seems a bit contrived - in the sense it looks as though you're playing from memory, but tasteful certainly. Same goes for the solo. Starts off okay then seems to run out of steam, those single notes are hesitant.

    I'd like to see you stick the backing on for at least five choruses and just jam over it. Let go and see what happens. Fact is, the more you do, the more you get into it. At the end you'll probably be well away and not want it to stop! Which means neither will the listener.

    I think what pushkar000 said was good too. In any case, you only need to share the goes that work. I chuck away tons of stuff if I decide it's not quite right.

    Something like that :-)

  20. #80
    I just did this a moment ago. But don't follow me, I break all the rules! And there're a lot of things wrong with it, but it doesn't matter, does it?


  21. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1 View Post
    I just did this a moment ago. But don't follow me, I break all the rules! And there're a lot of things wrong with it, but it doesn't matter, does it?

    My 1 cent,
    You have to work on 251 progresions...I mean jazz language.
    is it your 6st take?
    I think you love this tune very much...that is good.
    Best
    Kris

  22. #82
    Quote Originally Posted by kris View Post
    is it your 6st take?
    9th. And I have more unposted.

    I think you love this tune
    I do this with every tune in the Practical Standards threads. One of them I did 11, maybe more, all different.

    You may be right about the 2-5-1s but if I stopped to think every time I met one I'd be a nervous wreck. The other alternative is playing known licks and I refuse to do that. But I do use a lot of syncopation, delayed notes and beats, and irregular groupings.

    Basically I play the minor or substituted minor, a diatonic, altered, or substituted dom7, and a diatonic or lydian M7/6. I play what my ear tells me at the time. Non-diatonic M7s are treated as lydian. There's no set pattern.

    I don't know whether what I'm playing is jazz per se, I just make music. I don't play bebop because it's too complicated and I doubt if I could do it anyway because I don't 'hear' it. I'm more emotive and lyrical than technical. That's just my style, probably from originally being a singer.

  23. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1 View Post
    9th. And I have more unposted.



    I do this with every tune in the Practical Standards threads. One of them I did 11, maybe more, all different.

    You may be right about the 2-5-1s but if I stopped to think every time I met one I'd be a nervous wreck. The other alternative is playing known licks and I refuse to do that. But I do use a lot of syncopation, delayed notes and beats, and irregular groupings.

    Basically I play the minor or substituted minor, a diatonic, altered, or substituted dom7, and a diatonic or lydian M7/6. I play what my ear tells me at the time. Non-diatonic M7s are treated as lydian. There's no set pattern.

    I don't know whether what I'm playing is jazz per se, I just make music. I don't play bebop because it's too complicated and I doubt if I could do it anyway because I don't 'hear' it. I'm more emotive and lyrical than technical. That's just my style, probably from originally being a singer.
    so it is not the jazz interpratation?
    Reguraly singers just sing only the head...I think.

  24. #84
    Quote Originally Posted by kris View Post
    so it is not the jazz interpratation?
    Reguraly singers just sing only the head...I think.
    Well, I'm not a jazz singer but usually the singer sings the whole song, I think! It depends. With How High the most famous singers did a lot of scat over it (not my thing). And a lot of jazz tunes may not have too many verses (How High only has two) so there's more room for instrumentation, especially with band arrangements.

  25. #85
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    SO much serious stuff happening here, wow, that is the song I love really.

    Before making my own version I did my tribute to the Great Figures of Jazz. Some flaws in playing as well as in the score. Anyway I can share pdf with everyone interested. C&C welcome.

    PS: This one chorus taught me a lot about triplet subdivisions if you know what I mean

  26. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1 View Post
    Well, I'm not a jazz singer but usually the singer sings the whole song, I think! It depends. With How High the most famous singers did a lot of scat over it (not my thing). And a lot of jazz tunes may not have too many verses (How High only has two) so there's more room for instrumentation, especially with band arrangements.

    Ella Fitzgerald sing great head and the scat solo is fantastic.

  27. #87
    Quote Originally Posted by kris View Post
    Ella Fitzgerald sing great head
    So did all the others. Even Nat King Cole tried it. And nothing on earth would make me crack any jokes either

  28. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by kris View Post
    Ella Fitzgerald sing great head and the scat solo is fantastic.
    Kris, that would be a great solo on guitar. Very melodic but I'm partial to melodic and motif based solos. Thanks for posting.

  29. #89
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    Hi Gramps,
    There is another version...faster tempo and more interesting ...I think
    Best
    Kris

  30. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gramps View Post
    Kris, that would be a great solo on guitar. Very melodic but I'm partial to melodic and motif based solos. Thanks for posting.
    Steal it - '(cultural) appropriation' is how this stuff gets learned.

    (I don't speak for anyone else, but my black family - generous to a fault - would approve. EDIT But they might laugh if it's crap, which is also useful to know.)
    "Each heart vibrates to that iron string."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    (who obviously played in Carl Kress tuning)

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