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  1. #1
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    September 2017 - In a Sentimental Mood

    Our standard for Sept 2017 will be In a Sentimental Mood - by Duke Ellington, Irving Mills, and Manny Kurtz (1935).

    Background:
    Jazz Standards Songs and Instrumentals (In a Sentimental Mood)

  2. #2

    Ethan Iverson on IaSM

    Ethan Iverson on IaSM
    Here's his New Yorker article on it - his analysis of Duke Ellington and Bill Evans' versions - recorded the same night 50 years ago
    Duke Ellington, Bill Evans, and One Night in New York City | The New Yorker

  3. #3
    Very good article. The New Yorker was always good.

  4. #4


    So strange. Good things in it though.

  5. #5
    Thanks, fuzz, I think you're right. It was actually quite tricky to do the stops without making them too... what... sudden?

    The Ellington/Coltrane version stops the backing till beat 1 but starts with a drum roll on the 3. Ella Fitzgerald does beat 1. Kenny Burrell does beat 1 too. By the way, I don't like Bill Evan's upbeat version much. Don't think it suits.

    Anyway, I've redone it now so this is my submission, previous versions deleted. Thanks for your help. Apologies to those who listened to the first one. Of course, if there's anybody who preferred it without stops, it can be resurrected!*



    * I know it's only important to me but you never know :-)

  6. #6
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    Nice old Tune

    The Duke and many others recorded this tune in the 30's and 40's. I think I'll go for as a bluesey ballad version in D minor.

    wiz (Howie)
    Howie

  7. #7
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    I,ve played it few years ago with the trio on my D,Aspiranta guitar....:-)

  8. #8
    Very nice. Good fiddler too. There's so much talent around!

    After the slow one I decided to zip it up a bit... it may have lost some sentimentality en route :-)


  9. #9
    lovely ballad - here's a recent short live clip..horn's got head + guit solo..


  10. #10
    In case, like me, you were wondering :-)


    EWI (an acronym for electronic wind instrument) is the name of AKAI's wind controller, an electronic musical instrument invented by Nyle Steiner.

    September 2017 - In a Sentimental Mood-akai-ewi-usb-249006-jpg

    The early models consisted of two parts: a wind controller and a synthesizer. The current model, EWI4000S, combines the two parts into one, placing the synthesizer in the lower section of the controller.

    It uses the Boehm fingering system and is designed to be similar in action to a soprano saxophone, although players familiar with the clarinet should have no problem adjusting to the fingering; the EWI instruments can also be played with a simpler fingering system that recorder players can play with very little adjustment. Modern instruments also can be switched to flute, oboe and even brass instruments fingering modes.[1] Like a soprano sax, it is straight, and is held in front of the body with a neck strap. The major manufacturers of wind controllers are Akai and Yamaha. Available models include the AKAI EWI3020, AKAI EWI4000s, AKAI EWI USB, Yamaha WX5, Yamaha WX11, Yamaha WX7, and Synthophone. There is also a controller intended to be played by brass instrumentalists called an EVI (for Electronic Valve Instrument) also invented by Nyle Steiner. The Akai EWI4000S has a special EVI mode that allows brass players to play the EWI. More info on the EVI fingering system. There are also homemade and experimental EWIs with different designs.

    The wind controller part of the EWI has a mouthpiece with sensors for air pressure (volume control) and lip pressure (vibrato). The EWI keys do not move, but work through conductivity, sensing the positioning of the fingers by electrical current; this allows for very fast playing. The octave is determined by a set of rollers operated by the left thumb. The wind controller is used to control a synthesizer. Some EWIs have to be attached to a specific synth module, and some have direct output to the MIDI interface. It is also possible to connect the EWI to a Digital Work Station (soundboard) to produce an even larger variety of sounds. Though it is usually associated with jazz/rock fusion and, more recently, with New Age music, the EWI is a musically versatile instrument. The air pressure sensor allows for great dynamic range, especially in combination with an analog synthesizer. Tonal range is also great, usually extending to 8 octaves.

  11. #11
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    from a gig last July, in my signature "drunk guy on a tightrope" style



  12. #12
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    finally got a chance to listen. Nice job everybody. I really dig Kris's solo. This is a great tune to have in the repertoire.

    Iverson's article is great, and that Ellington/Gonsalves version he links to is incredible. His comparison with Evans' version is also very eye (ear)-opening. That Ellington take really makes Evans' sound tame in comparison.
    Last edited by pkirk; 09-09-2017 at 04:40 PM.

  13. #13
    Time to revisit this, in spite of Florida. Hope fuzz likes that fill :-)



    so bland it's good :-)

  14. #14
    I suppose one video's de rigeur... if it sounds casual it might be because the gas company are digging up the LAWN! Not to worry, it'll grow back quite happily. The lawn, that is :-)



    Is it me or is it quiet round here at the moment? Hope it's got nothing to do with Florida.

    Last edited by ragman1; 09-27-2017 at 07:09 AM.

  15. #15
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    In A Sentimental Mood (for the forum)

    O.K., Here is my input, a bluesey version in D minor. I created a new BIAB backing track for this one with an 8 bar intro, 3 choruses, and a typical ending (All Real Tracks). The 8 bar intro is basically a repeated, altered 1-6-2-5. I did the three choruses by ear but did not follow the melody too close. I experimented quite a bit with different concepts of Melodic and Harmonic minor so you might hear some strange stuff (Not my normal improv).

    wiz (Howie)

    https://app.box.com/s/x8kgvqp1l3kbe7k0ubrark2535znq0oy
    Howie

  16. #16
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    My first attempt, played some chords under and then melody on top:


  17. #17
    This is a much 'free-er' version. I wish I was playing a saxophone :-)


  18. #18
    People used to post backing tracks for us low-life folks who couldn't/wouldn't bother to make our own. That was cool. I know I could make my own and should do so, but anyway.... :-)

    Besides which, it might be cool to hear different versions of backing tracks....

  19. #19
    Well, that one above was just the YouTube 'Learn Jazz Standards' one. They can always be doctored to shorten them or put in stops etc.


  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1 View Post
    This is a much 'free-er' version. I wish I was playing a saxophone :-)

    I love the gypsy vibe of that

  21. #21
    Okay, just melody and one chorus:

    Really beautiful tune.


  22. #22
    One last go on this before we get a new tune. I quite like this one. I shouldn't think anyone will bother with it but it's a fairly serious take! I've stuck it up into G to get a different feel.


  23. All what you did in the theme was very very good but it seemed too cautiously played I think. If you did your own transcription from that and played with full confidence, I'd keep it. The link

  24. #24
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    I am new here (new to jazz as well) and I'm not sure I understand how this works, if I understand correctly you learn the tune and play it. So I tried, learned first half yesterday evening and recorded today, tried to improvise a bit, dont think I managed well, but nevertheless here is my take, feel free to comment.


  25. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by emanresu View Post
    All what you did in the theme was very very good but it seemed too cautiously played I think. If you did your own transcription from that and played with full confidence, I'd keep it. The link
    You mistake sensitivity and self-listening for caution. I've played it now a hundred times. Going through the head is child's play. Making improvisations as you go is another. All that was take one.

    Do you mean transcribe what I played and then play it by rote from the page? Good lord. It would never sound the same, it would sound false and mechanical. I'd never do that. I don't even play the lead sheet exactly as written for the same reason.

    Also I don't think I like the sound of 'full confidence'. Perhaps only fools have full confidence. Perhaps it's easy if you're playing right off a page (or by memory) but I don't think I'd do that. We're fallible, prone to error. I'd rather risk making the occasional slip than play safe. In any case, it wouldn't be improvisation, would it?

    Don't keep any of them, that's my advice! Tomorrow they're yesterday's news.

  26. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Raimonds View Post
    I am new here (new to jazz as well) and I'm not sure I understand how this works, if I understand correctly you learn the tune and play it. So I tried, learned first half yesterday evening and recorded today, tried to improvise a bit, don't think I managed well, but nevertheless here is my take, feel free to comment.
    I liked it. I liked the changed rhythm, it worked. You're obviously a blues-type player and it can be a sort of bluesy ballad.

    Yes, you basically do what jazz players do, play the tune and then do some improv. I generally give it a few goes round and then re-establish the tune at the end again. But you don't have to. Too long can bore other people. It's something I'm bad at, personally, I tend to keep going on and on :-)

  27. Quote Originally Posted by ragman1 View Post
    You mistake sensitivity and self-listening for caution. I've played it now a hundred times. Going through the head is child's play. Making improvisations as you go is another. All that was take one.

    Do you mean transcribe what I played and then play it by rote from the page? Good lord. It would never sound the same, it would sound false and mechanical. I'd never do that. I don't even play the lead sheet exactly as written for the same reason.

    Also I don't think I like the sound of 'full confidence'. Perhaps only fools have full confidence. Perhaps it's easy if you're playing right off a page (or by memory) but I don't think I'd do that. We're fallible, prone to error. I'd rather risk making the occasional slip than play safe. In any case, it wouldn't be improvisation, would it?

    Don't keep any of them, that's my advice! Tomorrow they're yesterday's news.
    It was my impression. I hear this in my own playing a lot so I'm super-sensitive to this. It's not something to avoid or push through. It's just.. eh. If having a good idea, the best is to make it sound as one. Thats all.
    Didn't mean to aggravate.

  28. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by emanresu View Post
    It was my impression. I hear this in my own playing a lot so I'm super-sensitive to this. It's not something to avoid or push through. It's just.. eh. If having a good idea, the best is to make it sound as one. Thats all.
    Didn't mean to aggravate.
    No, you're not aggravating at all, it's okay. But really it's not caution. After a million goes I can do it in my sleep! But it may be my style. I do have a sensitive delivery, probably from being a singer first. I tend to emote as though I'm singing. But maybe you're right, perhaps it's not the best approach for a guitarist.

    After I posted to you I got the guitar and played just the head (again) freestyle. Then I put some sounds in the background... I agree, it sounds like I'm treading on eggshells. But it wasn't what I was thinking or feeling, I was just doing it all over again :-)



    (Sorry, thread!)

  29. #29
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    It's still September in my part of the world - so, I'm in on time, for a change!

    http://www.noiseinthebasement.com/mp3s/IaSM%2000.mp3

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    People used to post backing tracks for us low-life folks who couldn't/wouldn't bother to make our own. That was cool. I know I could make my own and should do so, but anyway.... :-)

    Besides which, it might be cool to hear different versions of backing tracks....
    There are quite a few decent backing tracks for this tune on YouTube. I found four that I liked and threatened to actually use one of them, this month, but ... I can't help myself.

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